Author Topic: The 100 Years Ago Thread  (Read 2895 times)

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #30 on: July 12, 2018, 01:55:03 AM »
Those first tanks were quite something.  All new technology.  The "wrap around" tracks just fascinate me.

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Oh yes, I really like WWI tanks too.  The British certainly had it over the Germans when it came to tank design.  The German tanks were like slow moving boxcars.  Way too stocky and clumsy.

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A captured German tank.

Kidnostad

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #31 on: July 12, 2018, 11:30:01 AM »
Good to see this thread reestablished on EG.

Walks_At_Night

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #32 on: July 12, 2018, 05:16:59 PM »
100 years ago today, the Imperial Japanese Navy's battleship Kawachi went down in under 4 minutes after an accidental
magazine explosion.   Over 600 sailors went down with her.

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2018, 02:38:33 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 13, 1918.

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The German Spring Offensive. Portuguese gunners receiving instruction from the Royal Garrison Artillery gunners at a 9.2inch howitzer actually in action. Arras, 13 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239689 © IWM (Q 7894)

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2018, 03:14:45 AM »
Things that were invented in 1918:

Super heterodyne receiver  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superheterodyne_receiver
French dip sandwich            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_dip
Torque wrench                     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_wrench
Crystal oscillator                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator
Grocery bag                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shopping_bag
Hydraulic brake                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_brake 
Blender                                 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blender
Silica gel                               https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silica_gel

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2018, 03:29:38 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, July 13, 1918.

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #36 on: July 14, 2018, 01:46:07 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 14, 1918.


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British troops cultivating vegetables near Fruges, 14 July 1918. The soldier on the right is a serviceman of the North Staffordshire Regiment. Note a scarecrow in the shape of a German soldier.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244839 © IWM (Q 9054)

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French civilian and a British soldier fishing in the canalized Somme River at Amiens, 14 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247166 © IWM (Q 11583)

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #37 on: July 14, 2018, 02:02:52 AM »

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #38 on: July 15, 2018, 01:14:38 AM »
I had three great uncles who fought in World War One.  Their were Loyd, Lyle and Elmer Head.  They had joined the National Guard in Iowa and they went overseas to France as part of the famous Rainbow Division. The three brothers got to stay together after their arrival in France but Elmer was later transferred elsewhere.

On July 15, 1918, shortly after midnight, the German army attacked the line at Champagne that was held by the Rainbow Division.  Loyd was killed by a high explosive shell during the battle.  The Germans were held off and I read somewhere that they were unable to advance anywhere after this engagement and that it was all backwards for them from that point on.

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Here is a biography that had been written about Loyd by some members of the American Legion Post that had been named after him.  They had written Loyd's name with two L's when he actually only had one L in his first name.





Walks_At_Night

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #39 on: July 15, 2018, 06:37:48 AM »
Thanks for sharing that Rix.  I'm sorry that Great Uncle Loyd never made it home.  The German attack on July 15th, 1918
is known as the Second Battle of the Marne and it was their last gasp in trying to break the French Army.  By July 17th, the French
- supported by Americans, British and Italians stopped the Germans.

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #40 on: July 15, 2018, 07:15:54 PM »
Thanks, Walks.  I actually got to see my Great Uncle Lyle once.  He was in bed with one of his legs elevated and wrapped up with his foot sticking out and his toes were all blue.  He kept' barking out orders to Mom.  (Probably to keep us howling kids quiet.)  Great Uncle Elmer died in the 1920's from the lingering effects of mustard gas.  Merritt Head elected to have his son's body returned to Greenfield for a full military funeral and three years later, it was.  Merritt (we called him Grandpa Dad) was some type of cement wholesaler.  He supplied all the cement for the Winchester Bridge in Winchester, Oregon.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/douglas/83923401221/

albrecht

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #41 on: July 15, 2018, 08:50:33 PM »
Thanks, Walks.  I actually got to see my Great Uncle Lyle once.  He was in bed with one of his legs elevated and wrapped up with his foot sticking out and his toes were all blue.  He kept' barking out orders to Mom.  (Probably to keep us howling kids quiet.)  Great Uncle Elmer died in the 1920's from the lingering effects of mustard gas.  Merritt Head elected to have his son's body returned to Greenfield for a full military funeral and three years later, it was.  Merritt (we called him Grandpa Dad) was some type of cement wholesaler.  He supplied all the cement for the Winchester Bridge in Winchester, Oregon.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/douglas/83923401221/

Interestng stuff!  And cool to build something that lasts. That bridge site is awesome! I looked up.a bunch of old bridges I was trying to recall details on. Thanks!

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #42 on: July 15, 2018, 09:55:45 PM »
Interestng stuff!  And cool to build something that lasts. That bridge site is awesome! I looked up.a bunch of old bridges I was trying to recall details on. Thanks!

Glad you liked the website on bridges, mr. a.  Enjoy!

WhiteCrow

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #43 on: July 15, 2018, 10:05:19 PM »
Good to see this thread reestablished on EG.

Yes! Thank you Mr Gins

WhiteCrow

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #44 on: July 15, 2018, 10:26:13 PM »
Going to Oshkosh  EAA later this month

Seeing and hearing the War Birds is worth the admission price. Anyone else going?


EllGab™️

Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #44 on: July 15, 2018, 10:26:13 PM »