EllGab™️

General Stuff => Random Topics => Topic started by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 07:42:49 PM

Title: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 07:42:49 PM
How does your garden grow?  A couple of the fellows and I were talking about oranges a little while ago and it came to me that we could use a gardening thread around here.  We can discuss our gardens, talk about plants in general, and trees too.  We could also upload photos of our vegetables, fruits and flowers.  (And pests.  Peter W. displayed some nice snail pics on the old board.)  Might be fun, and for starters, I spotted a baby Praying Mantis the other day.  Fascinating creatures.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: pate on September 25, 2018, 05:45:26 AM
I bet it was a Male mantis, they don't get very big.  It's pretty late in the season for baby manti.  It is getting close to egg sack laying/formation time so if your lil' fella "gets lucky" it'll be his head...

I bought five mantis egg sacks for my garden this spring, I haven't seen any running around in months.  I even captured a female and released her a few weeks ago, same story.  I think the birds are eating them.

This year's container garden: Tomatos, squash, cucumbers (complete failure again), and peppers.

I also dug up all the crabgrass and seeded with bentgrass (putting green grass) it is coming in nicely where the dogs are allowing it.  Most of the lawn is Bermuda grass which I actually like because the dogs can't seem to kill it, and I can cut it really low (middle setting on a reel mower, maybe 1/2 to 3/4 inch).  The bentgrass I overseeded into the Bermuda is slowly coming up.

That bentgrass seed is fairly expensive, I think, 1 lb cost about 16 bucks.  1lb/1000 sqft, lucky I have a tiny backyard.  30 ft by maybe 60-80 ft.  Nice thing about the bentgrass seed I got is that it sprouts in about 3-4 days (or has for me in the three sections I have seeded since mid-August).  Takes a lot of water though.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on September 25, 2018, 08:02:14 PM
Any of you have a good organic cure for flea beetles?  I brought in some top soil from a local landscaping company a couple of years ago, and I have been dealing with those little bastards ever since.  I've kept them in check by spraying with  pyrethrins, but the less spraying, the better.  Once winter hits, I plan to take a weed burner and torch the hell out of my little garden plot.  I don't know if that will do any good, but the thought of burning the little bastards unborn makes me happy.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on September 25, 2018, 08:06:45 PM
Any of you have a good organic cure for flea beetles?  I brought in some top soil from a local landscaping company a couple of years ago, and I have been dealing with those little bastards ever since.  I've kept them in check by spraying with  pyrethrins, but the less spraying, the better.  Once winter hits, I plan to take a weed burner and torch the hell out of my little garden plot.  I don't know if that will do any good, but the thought of burning the little bastards unborn makes me happy.

Maybe diatomaceous earth?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: ShayP on September 25, 2018, 08:20:09 PM
Maybe diatomaceous earth?

Gravity is on to something.  I can't speak from personal experience because I do not have a green thumb.  However, my cousin has gardens of all varieties and swears by the stuff.  It's definitely worth a shot.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 25, 2018, 08:24:00 PM
Any of you have a good organic cure for flea beetles?  I brought in some top soil from a local landscaping company a couple of years ago, and I have been dealing with those little bastards ever since.  I've kept them in check by spraying with  pyrethrins, but the less spraying, the better.  Once winter hits, I plan to take a weed burner and torch the hell out of my little garden plot.  I don't know if that will do any good, but the thought of burning the little bastards unborn makes me happy.

If you have the room, planting these next year might help. Wiki:
Quote
Flea beetles can be deterred by a number of different companion plants, that can be grown intercropped in a garden to benefit neighboring plants. For example, thyme, catnip, and other kinds of mint cover up the scent of nearby plants.
Radishes, on the other hand, can be grown as a trap crop, luring the flea beetles away from more important crops. Since the root isn't harmed by the beetles, they remain useful, themselves.  A number of natural predators can be employed to keep flea beetles in check, including two that parasitize it: Braconid wasps and tachinid flies. In both cases, the larval stage feeds on the flea beetle, while the adults feed on nectar and pollen; some species are even important pollinators.
To encourage Braconid wasps and Tachinid flies, some types of flowers can be planted between crops: umbels such as caraway, herb fennel, coriander and Ammi majus, and simple open flowers such as California poppies and pot marigolds, as well as yarrows.
]
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on September 25, 2018, 08:25:48 PM
Gravity is on to something.  I can't speak from personal experience because I do not have a green thumb.  However, my cousin has gardens of all varieties and swears by the stuff.  It's definitely worth a shot.
Wear a mask and watch breathing during application of such!

The debate:
I was outta town for a month and got yuuge number of various peppers. Apparently we had rain and sun lots. But most ripe to red: japs, cerrano, and bananna. Still good? Hotter or less due to color? Ways to use them?

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on September 25, 2018, 08:29:22 PM
Wear a mask and watch breathing during application of such!

The debate:
I was outta town for a month and got yuuge number of various peppers. Apparently we had rain and sun lots. But most ripe to red: japs, cerrano, and bananna. Still good? Hotter or less due to color? Ways to use them?

Generally just a tad sweeter if they turn red. I don’t think they get hotter.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 25, 2018, 08:33:51 PM
I bet it was a Male mantis, they don't get very big.  It's pretty late in the season for baby manti.  It is getting close to egg sack laying/formation time so if your lil' fella "gets lucky" it'll be his head...

I bought five mantis egg sacks for my garden this spring, I haven't seen any running around in months.  I even captured a female and released her a few weeks ago, same story.  I think the birds are eating them.

This year's container garden: Tomatos, squash, cucumbers (complete failure again), and peppers.

I also dug up all the crabgrass and seeded with bentgrass (putting green grass) it is coming in nicely where the dogs are allowing it.  Most of the lawn is Bermuda grass which I actually like because the dogs can't seem to kill it, and I can cut it really low (middle setting on a reel mower, maybe 1/2 to 3/4 inch).  The bentgrass I overseeded into the Bermuda is slowly coming up.

That bentgrass seed is fairly expensive, I think, 1 lb cost about 16 bucks.  1lb/1000 sqft, lucky I have a tiny backyard.  30 ft by maybe 60-80 ft.  Nice thing about the bentgrass seed I got is that it sprouts in about 3-4 days (or has for me in the three sections I have seeded since mid-August).  Takes a lot of water though.

I used to work at a place where, for some reason, full grown mantises would cling to the inside walls.  Everyonce in awhile I would spot one and put it in a small cardboard box.  Then, after I got home, I would take it outside and put it in my potted tomato plants.  It would usually hang around for a day or two before moving on to some other place.  It was kind of funny because I'd be at work, doing this and that, and someone would come up to me all at once with a mantis.  Ha, I'd have to stop what I was doing and go hunt down a cardboard box. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on September 25, 2018, 10:32:03 PM
Thanks for the advice!  May you never have to deal with these little bastards. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 08:00:46 PM
Thanks for the advice!  May you never have to deal with these little bastards.

You bet.  I hope that things work out for you next spring.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 26, 2018, 08:06:11 PM
Tomorrow I lay sod in my front yard.   80% chance of rain.  I'm gonna be a Mud Puppy!
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 08:10:12 PM
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Here is a pic of my ash tree out back, looking up through it to the top.  That poor old tree was badly overgrown so I had a tree service prune it back a ways.  They got rid of a lot of dead limbs and shaped it up real nice.  I get more sunlight coming through it now which is what I wanted.  If you look close, you can spot a circle of cable that was installed to hold back any heavy branches that might break during a storm.  Hopefully it will keep some of them from falling onto the house.  A couple of weeks ago the leaves were mostly green but now they are turning yellow real fast.   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Kingfish on September 26, 2018, 08:15:45 PM
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Here is a pic of my ash tree out back, looking up through it to the top.  That poor old tree was badly overgrown so I had a tree service prune it back a ways.  They got rid of a lot of dead limbs and shaped it up real nice.  I get more sunlight coming through it now which is what I wanted.  If you look close, you can spot a circle of cable that was installed to hold back any heavy branches that might break during a storm.  Hopefully it will keep some of them from falling onto the house.  A couple of weeks ago the leaves were mostly green but now they are turning yellow real fast.

You got ash borers in your area?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 08:21:32 PM
You got ash borers in your area?

No. Thankfully, they haven't made it to my state yet.  I did however use the trunk of the tree for a soccer goal post.  I didn't think I was hitting it so hard, but after awhile a large section of bark started to peel off.  Needless to say, I quit hitting it with the soccer ball. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on September 26, 2018, 08:29:54 PM
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Here is a pic of my ash tree out back, looking up through it to the top.  That poor old tree was badly overgrown so I had a tree service prune it back a ways.  They got rid of a lot of dead limbs and shaped it up real nice.  I get more sunlight coming through it now which is what I wanted.  If you look close, you can spot a circle of cable that was installed to hold back any heavy branches that might break during a storm.  Hopefully it will keep some of them from falling onto the house.  A couple of weeks ago the leaves were mostly green but now they are turning yellow real fast.

I have an Arizona Ash in my backyard that is huge. I planted it in 1994 so I don’t know how much longer it will survive. They tell me 20 years down here is an average. I will try to measure the circumference of the trunk this week. I have had to remove limbs like that a few times. It sure keeps down my AC costs in the summer since my backyard faces to the south. I have a Bradford Pear next to it that is starting to give up the ghost. I need to get it taken out.

I also have two huge Crape Myrtles along with several smaller ones.

Here is a picture of the big Crape Myrtle in the front.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 08:38:57 PM
I have an Arizona Ash in my backyard that is huge. I planted it in 1994 so I don’t know how much longer it will survive. They tell me 20 years down here is an average. I will try to measure the circumference of the trunk this week. I have had to remove limbs like that a few times. It sure keeps down my AC costs in the summer since my backyard faces to the south. I have a Bradford Pear next to it that is starting to give up the ghost. I need to get it taken out.

I also have two huge Crape Myrtles along with several smaller ones.

Here is a picture of the big Crape Myrtle in the front.

Nice.  Do you get a lot of butterflies and hummingbirds?  It seem like they would be attracted to that color.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on September 26, 2018, 08:45:08 PM
Nice.  Do you get a lot of butterflies and hummingbirds?  It seem like they would be attracted to that color.

I haven’t seen hummingbirds but butterflies and bees seem to go to town. I have had an owl nest in the front a couple of different times as well. Not every year.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on September 26, 2018, 08:55:51 PM
I have an Arizona Ash in my backyard that is huge. I planted it in 1994 so I don’t know how much longer it will survive. They tell me 20 years down here is an average. I will try to measure the circumference of the trunk this week. I have had to remove limbs like that a few times. It sure keeps down my AC costs in the summer since my backyard faces to the south. I have a Bradford Pear next to it that is starting to give up the ghost. I need to get it taken out.

I also have two huge Crape Myrtles along with several smaller ones.

Here is a picture of the big Crape Myrtle in the front.

That's beautiful.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on September 26, 2018, 09:01:52 PM
I have an Arizona Ash in my backyard that is huge. I planted it in 1994 so I don’t know how much longer it will survive. They tell me 20 years down here is an average. I will try to measure the circumference of the trunk this week. I have had to remove limbs like that a few times. It sure keeps down my AC costs in the summer since my backyard faces to the south. I have a Bradford Pear next to it that is starting to give up the ghost. I need to get it taken out.

I also have two huge Crape Myrtles along with several smaller ones.

Here is a picture of the big Crape Myrtle in the front.
Don't worry GS, the next storm will take out your Bradford Pear. It is funny, like clockwork, how neighborhoods have them all start failing at same time cause builders put them in at same time. You.can extend life a bit with good pruning but they are short term but folks like em cause quick growing, cheap, n nice blooms.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Chocolate coated jackboot on September 27, 2018, 08:02:31 AM
Crimson sweet watermelon, Leek, 2 rows onion(tops already dead, waiting to be dug up
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This years Florida-weaved Mortgage lifter tomatoes and next year's Leek seeds(the big alien looking puffy ball)
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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 28, 2018, 11:20:41 PM
Crimson sweet watermelon, Leek, 2 rows onion(tops already dead, waiting to be dug up
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This years Florida-weaved Mortgage lifter tomatoes and next year's Leek seeds(the big alien looking puffy ball)
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Yum, Chocolate.  I wish you were my next door neighbor so that you could slip me a couple of those freshly dug up onions. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 02, 2018, 07:43:56 PM
Here is a flower postcard.  Does anybody know what kind of flower it is?

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: pate on October 02, 2018, 07:50:01 PM
Here is a flower postcard.  Does anybody know what kind of flower it is?

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I believe that is a variety of Columbine.  State flower of Colorado I believe.  I have some purple/pink ones growing here and there...
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on October 02, 2018, 07:58:09 PM
I believe that is a variety of Columbine.  State flower of Colorado I believe.  I have some purple/pink ones growing here and there...

I believe you are correct Pate. A 5 pointed star with a bloom inside.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: pate on October 02, 2018, 08:05:01 PM
I believe you are correct Pate. A 5 pointed star with a bloom inside.

Huh, I was going by the leaves.  The ones I have flower like this:

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 02, 2018, 08:06:27 PM
I believe that is a variety of Columbine.  State flower of Colorado I believe.  I have some purple/pink ones growing here and there...

Well, that was fast.  Right you are, pate and Gravity. Good going!

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on October 02, 2018, 08:52:59 PM
Here is a flower postcard.  Does anybody know what kind of flower it is?

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columbine. likes lower montane areas, needs some shade.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on October 02, 2018, 08:57:45 PM
Wear a mask and watch breathing during application of such!

The debate:
I was outta town for a month and got yuuge number of various peppers. Apparently we had rain and sun lots. But most ripe to red: japs, cerrano, and bananna. Still good? Hotter or less due to color? Ways to use them?

Jalapeno and Serranos should be great. I think they get less bitter and a bit softer - when they're that ripe they don't hold up well to the bacon wrapped grill technique. They'd be great in salsa and such and they freeze really well too. For me, I've always found that the heat is from the amount of water they receive, but I live in a very dry climate. I really don't know about the Bananas.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 02, 2018, 10:38:15 PM
columbine. likes lower montane areas, needs some shade.

Right!  Thanks for playing, PolkaDot.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on October 03, 2018, 10:26:42 AM
Right!  Thanks for playing, PolkaDot.
I’m late to the game but love this topic idea! I have a feeling you all are in nicer gardening clime than I am. Love horticulture though, it’s one of my happy places. Thanks for starting this guys- I’m excited to see what everyone is up too in their gardens!
Title: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:18:14 PM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 06, 2018, 08:19:56 PM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?

Call Linda Moulton Howe
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: Walks_At_Night on October 06, 2018, 08:27:35 PM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?

They are in a hole?  If you can cover the hole exit with a screen at night.   Then the next day pump 50,000 gallons of water down thru the screen

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Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:29:10 PM
Call Linda Moulton Howe
Ha. I actually used the pool net to capture one because I didn't wanna kill bees (though someone chimed in "what if Africanized Bees?! They are mean and will follow you!)
BUT, you could be onto something. Nicanoids (sp?) she always blames. I'll hit up neighbors n friends who smoke or dip and throw the ashtrays and spitoons into the bush?
Nah, I'll figure it out. Open to more ideas though since my fire options are suspect due to proximity of house. Might get a tyvek suit and go zombie style dig n spray. Idk.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:31:42 PM
They are in a hole?  If you can cover the hole exit with a screen at night.   Then the next day pump 50,000 gallons of water down thru the screen

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Ha. Water restrictions. Friggin greenies. Even when we have floods or even rain. Though my "one day a week" I guess?
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: Walks_At_Night on October 06, 2018, 08:33:38 PM
Ha. Water restrictions. Friggin greenies. Even when we have floods or even rain. Though my "one day a week" I guess?

Well then a gallon of 93 Octane is the only thing left.

Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 06, 2018, 08:34:30 PM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?

When I was about 9 or 10 a group of us neighborhood kids were playing in a downed tree.  It was fun climbing through and over the branches that were still holding their leaves.  Suddenly I felt a sharp  sting in my right arm.  Oh, I thought to myself, a bee got me.  But then the sting repeated itself, over and over.  First time I was ever stung by a yellowjacket.  I went shouting and crying all the way home.  Later on I felt a bit silly, as if I should have toughed it out without bawling like a baby.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 06, 2018, 08:41:25 PM
Ha. I actually used the pool net to capture one because I didn't wanna kill bees (though someone chimed in "what if Africanized Bees?! They are mean and will follow you!)
BUT, you could be onto something. Nicanoids (sp?) she always blames. I'll hit up neighbors n friends who smoke or dip and throw the ashtrays and spitoons into the bush?
Nah, I'll figure it out. Open to more ideas though since my fire options are suspect due to proximity of house. Might get a tyvek suit and go zombie style dig n spray. Idk.

Usually that wasp&hornet spray knocks everything down from mud dobbers (harmless?) to paper wasps and yellow jackets. Any pics of the one you caught?
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:43:32 PM
When I was about 9 or 10 a group of us neighborhood kids were playing in a downed tree.  It was fun climbing through and over the branches that were still holding their leaves.  Suddenly I felt a sharp  sting in my right arm.  Oh, I thought to myself, a bee got me.  But then the sting repeated itself, over and over.  First time I was ever stung by a yellowjacket.  I went shouting and crying all the way home.  Later on I felt a bit silly, as if I should have toughed it out without bawling like a baby.
Haha. Yeah. Interesting tidbit: one's hand looked like "big baby hands" according to a kid. But summed up well. Also swelling from other stings but only 1/2 forearm swelled. Like half only. Stopped several inches below elbow. And dramatic stop. Later attempt someone was stung shoulder. No appreciable swelling (though we joked, 'you been lifting again') Another oddity, aside from initial stings (mowing) the others were us messing with it and spraying BUT folks wearing UT colors weren't stung or seemingly even targeted BUT guy in black shirt got nailed several times (this when I was poking/destroying hole with pool stick and others spraying worthless crap.)
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: Walks_At_Night on October 06, 2018, 08:46:56 PM
Haha. Yeah. Interesting tidbit: one's hand looked like "big baby hands" according to a kid. But summed up well. Also swelling from other stings but only 1/2 forearm swelled. Like half only. Stopped several inches below elbow. And dramatic stop. Later attempt someone was stung shoulder. No appreciable swelling (though we joked, 'you been lifting again') Another oddity, aside from initial stings (mowing) the others were us messing with it and spraying BUT folks wearing UT colors weren't stung or seemingly even targeted BUT guy in black shirt got nailed several times (this when I was poking/destroying hole with pool stick and others spraying worthless crap.)

That's savage man !!!!!!!!!!!!1
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:47:18 PM
Usually that wasp&hornet spray knocks everything down from mud dobbers (harmless?) to paper wasps and yellow jackets. Any pics of the one you caught?
No. I will tomorrow. At the time, after game, etc. Didnt have my phone (lock out during games) and then beers n dealing. Will try to do tomorrow. But, yeah, usually some hit usually convulse or die quick. N we had foaming and non. And several brands but old, low etc before the Walmart trip for bulk buy (that didnt work either.)
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 06, 2018, 08:50:06 PM
No. I will tomorrow. At the time, after game, etc. Didnt have my phone (lock out during games) and then beers n dealing. Will try to do tomorrow. But, yeah, usually some hit usually convulse or die quick. N we had foaming and non. And several brands but old, low etc before the Walmart trip for bulk buy (that didnt work either.)

Good news is Ags beat Kentucky who was ranked 15 in overtime. Texas/OU was a good game too.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Walks_At_Night on October 06, 2018, 08:51:51 PM
Well if you were stirring up a yellow jackets nest with a pool cue then please note that the gallon of 93 octane was a joke.

Go all Salt Walt on their ass with Isopropyl

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Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:53:37 PM
Good news is Ags beat Kentucky who was ranked 15 in overtime. Texas/OU was a good game too.
Too scary in 4th! But great win. We can both agree ou sucks!
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 06, 2018, 08:58:06 PM
Too scary in 4th! But great win. We can both agree ou sucks!

My son is a Texas fan
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 08:58:11 PM
Well if you were stirring up a yellow jackets nest with a pool cue then please note that the gallon of 93 octane was a joke.

Go all Salt Walt on their ass with Isopropyl

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Ha. Sorry. NO! Not that brave. Sorry, pool stick I mentioned was from pool I brought around to poke at distance. The one for net or brush with big extensions. "Hey, I'll poke and disturb, y'all spray n figure out where its at!" No hero, here, in this case. Now if my "shove road flare down" wins I might he hero...or goat. BUT you got ke thinking. Pool chemicals. Hmmm. Got chorine tablets, muratic acid, ...
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Walks_At_Night on October 06, 2018, 09:02:44 PM
Ha. Sorry. NO! Not that brave. Sorry, pool stick I mentioned was from pool I brought around to poke at distance. The one for net or brush with big extensions. "Hey, I'll poke and disturb, y'all spray n figure out where its at!" No hero, here, in this case. Now if my "shove road flare down" wins I might he hero...or goat. BUT you got ke thinking. Pool chemicals. Hmmm. Got chorine tablets, muratic acid, ...

Muratic acid you say?     You don't have a hair on your ass if you don't go that route!   We want a *full* report, mind you................

Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 09:05:37 PM
My son is a Texas fan
Nice. You must be, somewhat, happy realignment and bs $ makes Thanksgiving easier. Haha. And all can agree over meals that ou sucks.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 06, 2018, 09:07:52 PM
Nice. You must be, somewhat, happy realignment and bs $ makes Thanksgiving easier. Haha. And all can agree over meals that ou sucks.

My daughter is a happy camper right now. LSU and Auburn both lost. Iowa State beat Oklahoma St too. Seems to be quite a few upsets of ranked teams this week.

Hanging my head because I don’t think Nebraska will win a game this year.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 09:13:45 PM
Muratic acid you say?     You don't have a hair on your ass if you don't go that route!   We want a *full* report, mind you................


Can you believe they are building a new fire station near me! Damn. Great, more service. Bad, block parties. Fast response does jive with us. Not only those. Actually, n better in case of damage a simple dry-ice works. The chorline stuff is good but worrying (etched a friends car once.) AL n Muriatic is nice but, again, kids don't do. I never done any of them. New fire marshal we only burn stuff fot bbq or for illegals keeping warm on site. Sanctuary city!
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 09:15:53 PM
My daughter is a happy camper right now. LSU and Auburn both lost. Iowa State beat Oklahoma St too. Seems to be quite a few upsets of ranked teams this week.

Hanging my head because I don’t think Nebraska will win a game this year.
I miss them but never a good fit. Fans too nice, seriously. Even when we bitched about that weird county program that made them good.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on October 07, 2018, 05:25:21 AM
My son is a Texas fan

Don't let GS's flair distract you from the fact that Texas lost to Kansas.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on October 07, 2018, 05:34:32 AM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?

You might try making a trap to thin the numbers out a bit.  That might make it easier to get close to assess the nest so you can figure out a plan of attack.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/g20706063/homemade-yellow-jacket-trap/ (https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/g20706063/homemade-yellow-jacket-trap/)
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: wr250 on October 07, 2018, 06:49:38 AM
Can you believe they are building a new fire station near me! Damn. Great, more service. Bad, block parties. Fast response does jive with us. Not only those. Actually, n better in case of damage a simple dry-ice works. The chorline stuff is good but worrying (etched a friends car once.) AL n Muriatic is nice but, again, kids don't do. I never done any of them. New fire marshal we only burn stuff fot bbq or for illegals keeping warm on site. Sanctuary city!

get yourself some sevin. i would get the liquid and the powder garden dust.
at night (they are much less likely to leave the nest at night) flood the nest with sevin mixed as directed on its instructions. then put the powder down around the nest opening so the hornets have to get some on them as they leave/enter. with any luck they will take the sevin into the nest and it will kill the queen.

sevin has a very low toxicity to mammals, but is extremely toxic to insects.
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: pate on October 07, 2018, 07:16:56 AM
Either way, need to kill em. Situation, at one point was a "hold my beer" situation when neighbor decided a poke n spray approach would work. Another trip to store for cans of spray and Benadryl (I was thinking that could he illegal, some meth making thing) but electronic check-out didn't stop (maybe flagged for later?) Anyhow killer didnt work. Methods were being discussed over beers. Decided to wait til manana. Maybe best. Thoughts were: pour kerosene, flood with hose, shove a lit road flare down, fireworks, pull out bush with truck while folks spray hole, pour deisel, or "get a sharpshooter and dig out, I'm immune." Most ideas were agreed that get your kid to film this so abandoned, for now. The spray didnt even kill ones flying back and forth. Bought 12 cans at Walmart, discounted. Now I know why discounted. Ideas?

Call an exterminator, preferably one with a bee suit.

My brother does that sort of work, he has access to chemicals civilians can't buy.  I don't think it is all that expensive
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 08, 2018, 08:33:46 PM
I took a couple pics of my prizewinning (ha) tomato plants.  There is too much clay in my soil so I prefer to grow cherry, yellow pear and other small tomato varieties in a row of pots.

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Here you can see a yellow pear plant to the right.  You can also see a hummingbird feeder that I have hanging on the cage.  The hummingbirds love it.

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Here is a closeup of some Bush Early Girl tomatoes.  This picture was taken several weeks back while we still had some forest fire smoke in the air.  You can see some ash there on the tomatoes.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on October 08, 2018, 09:36:00 PM
Very nice!  I fear that this last round of rain has done my garden in for the year.  Most of my herbs have already drowned. 

How big of pots do you use, and do you use an automated watering system? 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 14, 2018, 07:22:48 PM
Very nice!  I fear that this last round of rain has done my garden in for the year.  Most of my herbs have already drowned. 

How big of pots do you use, and do you use an automated watering system?

For the most part, my pots are 15 inches wide at the top and 1 foot high.  I've got them up on wooden platforms, otherwise my pugs will help themselves to the ripe tomatoes.  I water the tomatoes with a hose and a nozzle attachment that allows the water to burble out.  (Harder spray settings will push the potting soil out of the pots.)

The nights are starting to hit upper thirties as a low temperature.  That temperature is just a hop, skip and a jump to 32 degrees, and the end of the growing season here.   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 14, 2018, 07:25:21 PM
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Would anybody like to hazard a guess as to what this colorful tree is called?
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 14, 2018, 07:29:21 PM
Call an exterminator, preferably one with a bee suit.

My brother does that sort of work, he has access to chemicals civilians can't buy.  I don't think it is all that expensive

I have not dug much or investigated BUT they seem to be gone? We've had some heavy rains this week so didn't check out. But this weekend was dry but I didn't see any flying around. A "cold-front" coming so maybe they have hunkered down? Or the cheap-ass poison last week, finally took hold? Or maybe natural life-cycle of the beasts that when fall comes the worker soldiers die and the queen(s) is still down there somewhere biding her time for revenge?

For some reason the rains have started by peppers up again. Nothing for most of summer but now, all of a sudden, a lot of banana peppers, cerranos are going crazy, some jalapenos, and, for some odd reason, Tabasco peppers just coming in (they are the weird ones that sorta grow "up," right? I've lost track of what I planted where and the little signs were washed away sometime.)
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 14, 2018, 07:39:45 PM
I have not dug much or investigated BUT they seem to be gone? We've had some heavy rains this week so didn't check out. But this weekend was dry but I didn't see any flying around. A "cold-front" coming so maybe they have hunkered down? Or the cheap-ass poison last week, finally took hold? Or maybe natural life-cycle of the beasts that when fall comes the worker soldiers die and the queen(s) is still down there somewhere biding her time for revenge?

For some reason the rains have started by peppers up again. Nothing for most of summer but now, all of a sudden, a lot of banana peppers, cerranos are going crazy, some jalapenos, and, for some odd reason, Tabasco peppers just coming in (they are the weird ones that sorta grow "up," right? I've lost track of what I planted where and the little signs were washed away sometime.)

Ha, I grew a number of Tabasco peppers some years back and you are right, they didn't turn red until the first frost occurred.  I did harvest enough of them to put in a long bottle with some olive oil.  I thought I could make my own Tabasco sauce but my experiment didn't work.  I put some of the oil in a pan with something that I was cooking and the kitchen became one big tear gas bomb.  My guests were running around crying and hurling insults at me!
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 14, 2018, 07:49:09 PM
Ha, I grew a number of Tabasco peppers some years back and you are right, they didn't turn red until the first frost occurred.  I did harvest enough of them to put in a long bottle with some olive oil.  I thought I could make my own Tabasco sauce but my experiment didn't work.  I put some of the oil in a pan with something that I was cooking and the kitchen became one big tear gas bomb.  My guests were running around crying and hurling insults at me!
I'm gonna try, or try at least the vinegar deal you see at bbq restaurants etc. Or used to, not so much anymore? How can I screw that up? Put the peppers in some vinegar....like
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Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: GravitySucks on October 14, 2018, 07:54:09 PM
I'm gonna try, or try at least the vinegar deal you see at bbq restaurants etc. Or used to, not so much anymore? How can I screw that up? Put the peppers in some vinegar....like
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https://oureverydaylife.com/pickle-tabasco-peppers-vinegar-salt-39279.html
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: albrecht on October 14, 2018, 07:57:17 PM
https://oureverydaylife.com/pickle-tabasco-peppers-vinegar-salt-39279.html
Thanks! This is looking a bit more complicated than I thought. I never canned anything. I figured I'd just rinse 'em and throw em in a jar with vinegar. Haha. But I think I can figure this out. (If this "cold-front" and rain don't kill em.)

friggin Boston....
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: wr250 on October 14, 2018, 07:58:24 PM
https://oureverydaylife.com/pickle-tabasco-peppers-vinegar-salt-39279.html
i would use cider vinegar in place of white vinegar. it adds a bit of flavor. white vinegar is best used for cleaning purposes.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 14, 2018, 08:14:51 PM
i would use cider vinegar in place of white vinegar. it adds a bit of flavor. white vinegar is best used for cleaning purposes.
Ha. I actually like white vinegar on chips (fries) rather than malt vinegar. Go figure. More tart? Idk. I think the Scots like it also?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: wr250 on October 14, 2018, 09:09:46 PM
Ha. I actually like white vinegar on chips (fries) rather than malt vinegar. Go figure. More tart? Idk. I think the Scots like it also?
the tartness is the same. the apple cider vinegar adds a subtle apple flavor that i like.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 14, 2018, 09:14:07 PM
the tartness is the same. the apple cider vinegar adds a subtle apple flavor that i like.
Interesting. I like apples most when with stuff like pork. Ideally, and easy, slice some up, some sauerkraut, some pork chops. Bake. Eat with side of apple sauce. For contrast? Since the apples baked are now soured?
Title: Re: Hornets or Yellowjackets
Post by: BartEllProducer on October 17, 2018, 01:27:16 PM
I'm gonna try, or try at least the vinegar deal you see at bbq restaurants etc. Or used to, not so much anymore? How can I screw that up? Put the peppers in some vinegar....like
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Great on Collards and turnips. Let it sit for 90 days.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 20, 2018, 03:12:41 PM
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Would anybody like to hazard a guess as to what this colorful tree is called?

Answer:
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delonix_regia
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 20, 2018, 03:21:49 PM
Answer:
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delonix_regia
I was gonna guess some exotic variety of Crepe Myrtle; due to trunk look and tropical local and since the painting/print wasn't very clear on blooms.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 20, 2018, 04:16:46 PM
I was gonna guess some exotic variety of Crepe Myrtle; due to trunk look and tropical local and since the painting/print wasn't very clear on blooms.

I thought you might notice the tops of palm trees in the background.  A tip off that it was in Florida, where Flame Trees are prevelant.  (Or were at one time?)  Have you got them in Texas?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on October 20, 2018, 04:26:42 PM
I thought you might notice the tops of palm trees in the background.  A tip off that it was in Florida, where Flame Trees are prevelant.  (Or were at one time?)  Have you got them in Texas?
Apparently though I'm not sure I've seen them. Mainly South TX. But some reports are far north as SA. I guess related to the also non-native "Mimosa" tree and shrubs like "Pride of Barbados" that does grow here.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 22, 2018, 11:20:03 AM
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Anybody know the name of this flower?  Clue: It can be found in the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on October 22, 2018, 12:54:59 PM
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Anybody know the name of this flower?  Clue: It can be found in the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

It's a Castillaja (Indian Paintbrush) it generally grows with grasses, it can't survive on it's own.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on October 22, 2018, 01:18:00 PM
It's a Castillaja (Indian Paintbrush) it generally grows with grasses, it can't survive on it's own.

That was my first thought but the ones we have down here don’t look quite like that. One of my favorite spring flowers. Usually last longer than the blue bonnets.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 22, 2018, 03:22:21 PM
It's a Castillaja (Indian Paintbrush) it generally grows with grasses, it can't survive on it's own.

Winner!

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Evil Twin Of Zen on October 27, 2018, 07:15:05 PM
Top 10 best plant identification apps (android/iphone) 2018  https://techigem.com/plant-identification-apps/

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 27, 2018, 08:10:27 PM
Top 10 best plant identification apps (android/iphone) 2018  https://techigem.com/plant-identification-apps/

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I never thought to look for a plant identifying app.  I downloaded the What's This Flower? on my tablet.  What a cool app.  Thanks, Evil!
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Evil Twin Of Zen on October 27, 2018, 09:20:13 PM
I never thought to look for a plant identifying app.  I downloaded the What's This Flower? on my tablet.  What a cool app.  Thanks, Evil!

No problem.

you can find all sorts of sensors and monitoring software for plants/gardens that can link to phones and other networks.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 01, 2018, 08:50:15 PM
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Does anybody know the name of these white flowers? 

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There might be a clue on the back of the postcard.  The state of North Carolina.  Perhaps the flower is indigenous to that state?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on November 01, 2018, 08:52:01 PM
my first instinct is dogwood, but it looks a bit low...
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 01, 2018, 09:06:34 PM
my first instinct is dogwood, but it looks a bit low...

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Cornus florida in spring.
By No machine-readable author provided. Mickaw2~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). - No machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1208176

I looked up a dogwood flower and it sure looks like the postcard pic to me.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornus  Congratulations, PolkaDot, another one bites the dust.

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 01, 2018, 09:24:29 PM
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Does anybody know the name of these white flowers? 

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There might be a clue on the back of the postcard.  The state of North Carolina.  Perhaps the flower is indigenous to that state?
On phone but looks more like Dogwood tree/bush, I think tree but understory blooms? Btw hornets seemingly "gone" from area BUT my Jack O' Latern, actually even when pumpkin, on porch attracted some? Color? Scent? I sprayed and carved. Tuen I got gnats quick (before cold-front, which really was storms.) Had to put candles in all day before Halloween to keep gnats or fruit flies at bay! This AM had to seal up in bag and throw away.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 02, 2018, 12:28:08 AM
On phone but looks more like Dogwood tree/bush, I think tree but understory blooms? Btw hornets seemingly "gone" from area BUT my Jack O' Latern, actually even when pumpkin, on porch attracted some? Color? Scent? I sprayed and carved. Tuen I got gnats quick (before cold-front, which really was storms.) Had to put candles in all day before Halloween to keep gnats or fruit flies at bay! This AM had to seal up in bag and throw away.

Yes, pretty sure it's a Dogwood tree.  I did refer to them as being flowers, but as it turns out they are flowers on a tree.  Enjoyed reading about the short, unhappy life of Mr. a's Jack O' Lantern.  Hornets like to gorge on sugars from rotting fruits and vegetables.  I bet that they were attracted to your pumpkin's aroma.  (I almost wrote that they probably smell better than humans, but I caught myself.)
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 06, 2018, 05:04:57 PM
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I came across this colorful produce crate label while looking up produce crate labels.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 06, 2018, 05:46:55 PM
Weird thing. It seems every year this mushroom pops up in the same place in the yard. I think there is an old tree stump there? Not sure what kind it is but seems weird it pops, even through whatever mulch I have put down, at roughly the same time each year, lives a little bit, then gone for months until next year.

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on November 06, 2018, 05:49:05 PM
Weird thing. It seems every year this mushroom pops up in the same place in the yard. I think there is an old tree stump there? Not sure what kind it is but seems weird it pops, even through whatever mulch I have put down, at roughly the same time each year, lives a little bit, then gone for months until next year.

I found some interesting fungi up at my place.  Here is one I need to see if it is Lion’s Mane.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 06, 2018, 05:57:26 PM
I found some interesting fungi up at my place.  Here is one I need to see if it is Lion’s Mane.
Somewhere I got a book, never used, but I can't find it. That is a cool looking one. I guess all the wet weather and now, slightly, cooler weather is bringing out fungi a lot.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on November 06, 2018, 06:05:59 PM
Weird thing. It seems every year this mushroom pops up in the same place in the yard. I think there is an old tree stump there? Not sure what kind it is but seems weird it pops, even through whatever mulch I have put down, at roughly the same time each year, lives a little bit, then gone for months until next year.

Are you using wood mulch every year?  If so, that's why you get the fungus.  If you're using different mulches, then you must have some buried wood or dead tree roots in that spot.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on November 06, 2018, 06:15:17 PM
Weird thing. It seems every year this mushroom pops up in the same place in the yard. I think there is an old tree stump there? Not sure what kind it is but seems weird it pops, even through whatever mulch I have put down, at roughly the same time each year, lives a little bit, then gone for months until next year.

Oooh! What a pretty fungus! I’m wondering if it’s a Leucocoprinus? They’re pretty stoked on organic matter & show up in indoor plant soil a lot? Mushrooms are hard bc they can be so different at different stages. I’m curious what the answer is!


Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: PolkaDot on November 06, 2018, 06:22:59 PM
I found some interesting fungi up at my place.  Here is one I need to see if it is Lion’s Mane.

Oh wow! I’ve never seen him his before- crazy! It’s really cool looking.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 06, 2018, 06:27:41 PM
Are you using wood mulch every year?  If so, that's why you get the fungus.  If you're using different mulches, then you must have some buried wood or dead tree roots in that spot.
I do use mulch but have used different kinds over the years and also it pops up in same place. I think there is a tree stump underneath but as I recall it was a cedar (juniper) which I would find out because they usually don't really rot or get fungi (why we used to use them for fence posts.) But maybe it was something else. I'm not planning to eat but still curious what kind it is.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 06, 2018, 06:29:04 PM
Oooh! What a pretty fungus! I’m wondering if it’s a Leucocoprinus? They’re pretty stoked on organic matter & show up in indoor plant soil a lot? Mushrooms are hard bc they can be so different at different stages. I’m curious what the answer is!
I did a half-hearted internet search and the pics I found doesn't look like that kind but the internet seems to get harder and harder to find real information easily. The amazing thing is how quickly it pops up, grows, stays a bit, dies, and then comes back next year.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GrumpyOldMan on November 08, 2018, 06:47:05 AM
Albrecht,

Take a look at this Reddit thread.  This is the closest match that I saw.  Fungus ID is not my in my wheel house.  Hope this helps.

https://www.reddit.com/r/mycology/comments/9ue2lo/just_outside_my_house_what_are_those/ (https://www.reddit.com/r/mycology/comments/9ue2lo/just_outside_my_house_what_are_those/)

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 08, 2018, 10:54:49 AM
Albrecht,

Take a look at this Reddit thread.  This is the closest match that I saw.  Fungus ID is not my in my wheel house.  Hope this helps.

https://www.reddit.com/r/mycology/comments/9ue2lo/just_outside_my_house_what_are_those/ (https://www.reddit.com/r/mycology/comments/9ue2lo/just_outside_my_house_what_are_those/)

Thanks, I will investigate.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 16, 2018, 05:30:48 PM
Freezing temperatures occurred in the Pacific Northwest this past week and as a consequence, my potted tomato plants bit the dust.

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I still have my hummingbird stopping by for nectar, though.  He (or she?) will hang around throughout the winter.

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One good thing, I was able to pick these two sweet peppers just before the frost hit.  They tasted great, chopped up and thrown into a panful of scrambled eggs.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 16, 2018, 05:35:37 PM
Freezing temperatures occurred here in the Pacific Northwest this past week and as a consequence, my potted tomato plants bit the dust.

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I still have my hummingbird stopping by for nectar, though.  He (or she?) will hang around throughout the winter.

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One good thing, I was able to pick these two sweet peppers just before the frost hit.  They tasted great, chopped up and thrown into a panful of scrambled eggs.

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Same deal here in Texas. Got into the 20s at night, of course warming up again now and all died. But I got one last big harvest of peppers. For some reason I can only grow peppers, as tomatoes seem to die, get eaten by critters, get those worms, etc. I guess just too darn hot in summer if you don't really pay attention to water and critters. And like you in pots so can dry out quick in the Texas summer sun. But I got a whole lot of jalapenos, cerranos, banana, and tabasco peppers off before the freeze. Sort of weird. Nothing on them all summer and then we had a wet fall and got a bit cooler and BOOM- peppers aplenty!

ps: Idk about hummingbirds? Do they migrate? Hibernate? Just survive? I also don't know how cold it usually gets up there (the NW can vary between fairly mild and wet to pretty cold and dry depending on which side of mountains, how close to coast, how high up, etc.) But if the hummingbirds are sticking around I guess you'd need to ensure the solution doesn't freeze! I don't think there would be flowers around for them to eat so....
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 16, 2018, 05:54:57 PM
Same deal here in Texas. Got into the 20s at night, of course warming up again now and all died. But I got one last big harvest of peppers. For some reason I can only grow peppers, as tomatoes seem to die, get eaten by critters, get those worms, etc. I guess just too darn hot in summer if you don't really pay attention to water and critters. And like you in pots so can dry out quick in the Texas summer sun. But I got a whole lot of jalapenos, cerranos, banana, and tabasco peppers off before the freeze. Sort of weird. Nothing on them all summer and then we had a wet fall and got a bit cooler and BOOM- peppers aplenty!

ps: Idk about hummingbirds? Do they migrate? Hibernate? Just survive? I also don't know how cold it usually gets up there (the NW can vary between fairly mild and wet to pretty cold and dry depending on which side of mountains, how close to coast, how high up, etc.) But if the hummingbirds are sticking around I guess you'd need to ensure the solution doesn't freeze! I don't think there would be flowers around for them to eat so....

That's right, most flowers are gone during the winter, but hummingbirds will stick around if you have a steady source of food for them.  Mine will stick around all year and will feed during harsh weather but as you noted, I will warm the nectar up if it has frozen outside, or if there is snow on the ground.  Those little birds are very hardy, and they go into a kind of deep sleep state during the frozen night, and they retain a little warmth inside to make it until morning.
http://www.birdsandblooms.com/blog/hummingbirds-survive-in-snow-and-freezing-temps/
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 17, 2018, 12:12:25 PM
That's right, most flowers are gone during the winter, but hummingbirds will stick around if you have a steady source of food for them.  Mine will stick around all year and will feed during harsh weather but as you noted, I will warm the nectar up if it has frozen outside, or if there is snow on the ground.  Those little birds are very hardy, and they go into a kind of deep sleep state during the frozen night, and they retain a little warmth inside to make it until morning.
http://www.birdsandblooms.com/blog/hummingbirds-survive-in-snow-and-freezing-temps/
Cool. Neat little birds, I had no idea they were so hardy. They seem so delicate. I found a hummingbird nest in one of my bushes once. It was so funny. Like a normal bird's nest shrunk to thumb-size.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 17, 2018, 01:56:41 PM
Cool. Neat little birds, I had no idea they were so hardy. They seem so delicate. I found a hummingbird nest in one of my bushes once. It was so funny. Like a normal bird's nest shrunk to thumb-size.

Wow, that is something.  I've never seen a hummingbird nest myself, but I have a sneaking suspicion that there is one nearby.  I have two hummingbirds that show up.  One spends his time sitting around the feeders and he will chase the other one away, whenever the other one try's to fly in for a drink.  I have seen the two of them feeding together on the big feeder, but only on very rare occasions.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 17, 2018, 02:20:52 PM
Wow, that is something.  I've never seen a hummingbird nest myself, but I have a sneaking suspicion that there is one nearby.  I have two hummingbirds that show up.  One spends his time sitting around the feeders and he will chase the other one away, whenever the other one try's to fly in for a drink.  I have seen the two of them feeding together on the big feeder, but only on very rare occasions.
Nest was very small, tightly built with small sticks, what looked like maybe lint from my dryer vent (?) and on a branch way back in a thick bush that I was cutting back. A place a human, or even a critter like a coon, possum, or cat would be able to crawl up into. A 'chicken' (rat) snake could get at it, I think, but eggs so small likely not 'worth it' for the snake and high enough to keep others out.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Dancing queen on November 17, 2018, 05:52:10 PM
One good thing, I was able to pick these two sweet peppers just before the frost hit.  They tasted great, chopped up and thrown into a panful of scrambled eggs.

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i never have luck with peppers and i have tried for years. those look delicious
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 17, 2018, 06:29:14 PM
i never have luck with peppers and i have tried for years. those look delicious

Yes, they were pretty tasty.  Heat wise, they were on the mild side.  Like my tomatoes, the peppers were grown in pots.   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Dancing queen on November 17, 2018, 06:43:54 PM
Yes, they were pretty tasty.  Heat wise, they were on the mild side.  Like my tomatoes, the peppers were grown in pots.

do they need more watering and shade in pots?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 18, 2018, 02:49:07 PM
i never have luck with peppers and i have tried for years. those look delicious
Strangely peppers have been about the only thing I can successfully grow. And usually pretty easy, if I can do it! The only problem I had this year was that a freeze hit before the Tabasco peppers were harvested. But Jalapenos, Cerranos, Bell, and Banana peppers were easy and lots of fruit production and basically no care except some water during the especially hot times.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 23, 2018, 01:54:03 PM
do they need more watering and shade in pots?

If the weather is hot, then the pots must be watered every other day, but if overcast or coolish, a good watering will last three or four days.  I use a special hose nozzle that allows for a nice flow of water that will fill the pot up quickly and yet it doesn't knock the potting soil onto the ground.  I use Black Gold flower and vegetable potting soil that has time released fertilizer and apply Jobe's vegetable feeder spikes in early August to give the plants enough of a shot in the arm to get them through to the first frost.  Shade is not an issue because I have them placed up against a tall fence.  The plants get plenty of sun during high summer, but less and less as autumn approaches.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 23, 2018, 02:33:51 PM
The peppers I gave to my sister-in-law since she has various blenders and likes to make and cook and she made a pretty good salsa (hot though for some) for some post-Thanksgiving fajitas lunch. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Dancing queen on November 24, 2018, 07:01:33 PM
thx for the tips and hints on how to get those peppers going.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 24, 2018, 08:17:08 PM
thx for the tips and hints on how to get those peppers going.

You are so very welcome!  As an afterthought, I would like to add that you might like to look for the biggest pepper plant of whatever varieties are available in the store.  Some of them even have tiny peppers growing on them when you put them in the pot.  That kind of saves you some time in case you have a short growing season.  Also, if your pepper plant has lots of blossoms, try shaking the plant a little.  I do that with my plants but I'm not really sure if it helps with pollinating them. haha 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 27, 2018, 10:39:35 AM
There appears to be a big debate on interwebs about this: when should one prune back Lantanas? I've always heard you wait until the end of winter or early spring to prune off the dead wood. Others have said once they are dead, as mine are after the first early freeze, you can prune back in "winter" (Central Texas so our "winter" can be in the 70s to freezing depending on the day. Haha.) Lastly, some people say prune (for shaping) while in bloom in the summer. They look shitty all dead and brown even though I know, if other years are correct, they will come back in spring once it warms up. Maybe it makes no difference? Idk.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 28, 2018, 02:11:51 PM
There appears to be a big debate on interwebs about this: when should one prune back Lantanas? I've always heard you wait until the end of winter or early spring to prune off the dead wood. Others have said once they are dead, as mine are after the first early freeze, you can prune back in "winter" (Central Texas so our "winter" can be in the 70s to freezing depending on the day. Haha.) Lastly, some people say prune (for shaping) while in bloom in the summer. They look shitty all dead and brown even though I know, if other years are correct, they will come back in spring once it warms up. Maybe it makes no difference? Idk.

I can only speak for roses, but after the first blooms of spring they tend to get kind of lanky so I will cut them back quite a bit.  Of course, it being early summer by this time, they will grow back rather quickly and more roses will come into bloom.  So then, they will be kind of stringy, and overgrown by the time winter rolls around and I will prune them back yet again.  We get some rather severe low temps around that time and yet my roses have never failed to grow and the whole cycle of cutting back in late spring and early winter repeats itself.   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 29, 2018, 01:46:57 PM
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Here is another fruit crate label that is better suited for the EllGab Garden rather than the Fruit and Vegetable Label thread.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 29, 2018, 02:16:14 PM
I can only speak for roses, but after the first blooms of spring they tend to get kind of lanky so I will cut them back quite a bit.  Of course, it being early summer by this time, they will grow back rather quickly and more roses will come into bloom.  So then, they will be kind of stringy, and overgrown by the time winter rolls around and I will prune them back yet again.  We get some rather severe low temps around that time and yet my roses have never failed to grow and the whole cycle of cutting back in late spring and early winter repeats itself.
Here I don't think we need to do much with roses. I recall up north folks would prune back and cover up with pine needles etc and then rely on snow to keep them from dying in the winter. I'm going to ask a neighbor who is always gardening about my lantanas when I can catch them outside.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: ACE OF CLUBS on November 29, 2018, 02:24:04 PM
George Noory sucks . . .
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 29, 2018, 07:40:30 PM
George Noory sucks . . .

Lemons?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 30, 2018, 01:37:35 PM
Here I don't think we need to do much with roses. I recall up north folks would prune back and cover up with pine needles etc and then rely on snow to keep them from dying in the winter. I'm going to ask a neighbor who is always gardening about my lantanas when I can catch them outside.

According to a humongous A to Z book on plants from 1999, Lantanas are classified as a group 9 plant when it comes to pruning.  This means that light pruning of the spent blooms should be done in late spring.  You already knew this though.  Severe pruning can be done also, but you won't get any blooms during the next growing season.  You have had winter damage already so you might want to sacrifice next years blooms for the safety of your plant.  Your call.  PS, it also said to prune back (at any time) any branch that ruins the symmetry of the Lantana.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on November 30, 2018, 01:44:32 PM
According to a humongous A to Z book on plants from 1999, Lantanas are classified as a group 9 plant when it comes to pruning.  This means that light pruning of the spent blooms should be done in late spring.  You already knew this though.  Severe pruning can be done also, but you won't get any blooms during the next growing season.  You have had winter damage already so you might want to sacrifice next years blooms for the safety of your plant.  Your call.  PS, it also said to prune back (at any time) any branch that ruins the symmetry of the Lantana.
Thanks.  So much conflicting information. Last year I cut down to the ground at the end of winter. And had great blooms and plants a foot, foot and 1/2, tall for the most of summer. And lots of butterflies which I know will make LMH happy. Those I don't want those to get much taller anyhow. But those were established ones. The new ones I planted this spring I worry about cutting back too much and due to their position I don't mind if they go crazy or grow large.  We'll see.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 01, 2018, 05:28:00 PM
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Another flowery fruit crate label.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: albrecht on December 02, 2018, 01:19:33 PM
According to a humongous A to Z book on plants from 1999, Lantanas are classified as a group 9 plant when it comes to pruning.  This means that light pruning of the spent blooms should be done in late spring.  You already knew this though.  Severe pruning can be done also, but you won't get any blooms during the next growing season.  You have had winter damage already so you might want to sacrifice next years blooms for the safety of your plant.  Your call.  PS, it also said to prune back (at any time) any branch that ruins the symmetry of the Lantana.
Old lady down on the block who gardens like it is going out of style said that I can cut them back. So I did. Now, we will see if they come back in the spring.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 15, 2018, 11:20:15 AM
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This postcard belongs in the EllGab Garden thread.  It is an advertisement for a florist's shop in Maine.

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I couldn't raise any info on the outfit so it might be gone, or it was bought out and resumed business under a different name.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 18, 2018, 02:01:29 PM
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Strange how citrus growers liked to use garden flowers to illustrate their produce.
Moving the Call Ranch house: http://www.coronaheritage.org/callhouse.html
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Sofia on December 19, 2018, 10:34:57 AM
I grew up with a rose garden (That was all I got), so I've been trimming them since I was in 7th grade.  If you include close ups of the vinework of your latanas, like angle your camera from under the blossoms if there are any, then I could give you specific guidance.  The time of year might not be as important as the placement, severity, and style of cut.  You probably already know to cut just above the nip, and to angle your cut top down, to minimize rain getting in the wound (not sure if it rains much where you are).  And the dead head to increase blooms.  It is fine to just prune the few inches under a dead head which are inches that are going to turn brown and fall off anyhow.  In general, I wouldn't prune very much at any one time, regardless off time of year, because I like tall rose bushes.  If you like short bushes, then yes you can cut them way down, but remember to cut above each nip, angle the blade down and inward so the wound kind has an overhang to keep rain out, and I would stagger the height of each major cut by many inches so your blossoms show more instead of all being at one height.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 24, 2018, 04:21:31 PM
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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 28, 2018, 01:32:54 AM
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https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

The latest issue of Agricultural News.  (100 years ago, that is.)  You can read it here:  https://archive.org/stream/agriculturalnews17grea/agriculturalnews17grea#page/n500/mode/1up
(Scroll down to page 413 for an interesting article on popcorn.)
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 07, 2019, 12:29:32 AM
I grew up with a rose garden (That was all I got), so I've been trimming them since I was in 7th grade.  If you include close ups of the vinework of your latanas, like angle your camera from under the blossoms if there are any, then I could give you specific guidance.  The time of year might not be as important as the placement, severity, and style of cut.  You probably already know to cut just above the nip, and to angle your cut top down, to minimize rain getting in the wound (not sure if it rains much where you are).  And the dead head to increase blooms.  It is fine to just prune the few inches under a dead head which are inches that are going to turn brown and fall off anyhow.  In general, I wouldn't prune very much at any one time, regardless off time of year, because I like tall rose bushes.  If you like short bushes, then yes you can cut them way down, but remember to cut above each nip, angle the blade down and inward so the wound kind has an overhang to keep rain out, and I would stagger the height of each major cut by many inches so your blossoms show more instead of all being at one height.

Thank you @Sofia for sharing your knowledge of pruning rose bushes.  Here is a pic of a rose from one of my bushes of twelve years back.  I can't remember what happened to the plant.  All I know is that it isn't around anymore and that's too bad because I've got other, less colorful roses that seem to have no trouble in surviving year after year.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: StarrMountain on January 07, 2019, 01:04:45 AM
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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Sofia on January 07, 2019, 01:21:12 AM
Thank you @Sofia for sharing your knowledge of pruning rose bushes.  Here is a pic of a rose from one of my bushes of twelve years back.  I can't remember what happened to the plant.  All I know is that it isn't around anymore and that's too bad because I've got other, less colorful roses that seem to have no trouble in surviving year after year.

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That is beautiful!  You're welcome.  Maybe someone dug it up when you weren't looking!
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Chine on January 10, 2019, 08:41:15 AM
What a lovely and refreshing thread.

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Bluejay on January 10, 2019, 09:56:23 AM
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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 11, 2019, 06:34:00 PM
Close up picture of a corpse plant.

You know Starr, whenever they have the flower of a Corpse Plant blooming, the botanical garden or university will usually put a webcam on it.  I like to watch the people file by looking at it, and I can do so for quite awhile.  I don't know why, but it fascinates me. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 11, 2019, 06:36:33 PM
What a lovely and refreshing thread.

What a nice thing to say.  I'm very happy that you like it.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 11, 2019, 06:38:26 PM
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Now that is simply beautiful!  Thank you, Bluejay.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 22, 2019, 01:49:40 AM
Time to plan for this year's EllGab Garden.  Here is a new seed catalogue from Burpee: https://www.burpee.com/

They have a new cherry tomato called Honeycomb Hybrid.  I sure wouldn't mind growing one of those in a pot, next spring: https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/tomatoes/tomato-honeycomb-hybrid-prod500384.html
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on January 22, 2019, 04:00:04 AM
I ordered some seeds from this interesting heritage seed place. They quickly shipped. Can’t wait to plant - glad I’m in Zone 9.
https://heritageseedmarket.com/
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 22, 2019, 04:45:18 AM
I ordered some seeds from this interesting heritage seed place. They quickly shipped. Can’t wait to plant - glad I’m in Zone 9.
https://heritageseedmarket.com/

That is a very cool seed outlet, Juan.  I am especially attracted to that African Queen tomato.  https://heritageseedmarket.com/index.php/product/african-queen/
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 25, 2019, 02:42:01 PM
I used to get a seed catalog mailed to me from this outfit: https://www.thompson-morgan.com/ But not for many years now.  They still sell onions in their online catalog but they don't show the pic of a man chomping into a big white onion as if it were a juicy apple.  I kind of miss seeing it, actually.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on January 25, 2019, 02:47:43 PM
I used to get a seed catalog mailed to me from this outfit: https://www.thompson-morgan.com/ But not for many years now.  They still sell onions in their online catalog but they don't show the pic of a man chomping into a big white onion as if it were a juicy apple.  I kind of miss seeing it, actually.

We have sweet onions in Texas that most people call “1015s”. They are ok but not as sweet as I remember the Bermuda onions I ate as a kid or the Vidalia onions I used to get from Georgia.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on January 25, 2019, 05:04:02 PM
I'm getting some sweet onion sets, but since I live a little ways outsize the official growing zone, I can't call them Vidalias.  We'll see what I get in this coastal soil.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on February 07, 2019, 04:53:40 PM
Started planting today. Probably pushing things a little but I am in zone 9.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 09, 2019, 01:07:55 AM
Here is a picture and an illustration from the book 'The Cactaceae: Descriptions and illustrations of plants of the cactus family.'  1919.

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https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

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https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 09, 2019, 01:50:38 AM
Started planting today. Probably pushing things a little but I am in zone 9.

Cool.  I hope that everything grows ok.  Here in the Pacific Northwest, I don't do any planting until the moon starts to wax after March 21.

Most stores that sell garden seeds are offering some good sales on their seed packets.  I bought this packet of Butterfly Weed seeds at Bi-Mart for half price.  I think I'll try to grow some of them in pots, across from my tomatoes.

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You can see the actual seeds at the bottom of the packet.  I guess they want their customers to see what size seeds they will be dealing with.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 13, 2019, 11:08:23 PM
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I was taking a walk and spotted an early sign of spring...some blooming crocus.  These two are part of a larger colony and I always keep an eye out for them when February rolls around.  In addition to being a sign of spring, they also serve as a reminder that my beloved Mardi Gras is approaching.  Only this time, Mardi Gras will start on March 1st and not in February.  I guess it's like Easter, the date gets moved around some.  Usually Mardi Gras starts sometime in February.   
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: KSM32 on February 13, 2019, 11:34:08 PM
This is the time of year when I really, really envy you folks down south. Grooaann..
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 15, 2019, 08:54:10 PM
This is the time of year when I really, really envy you folks down south. Grooaann..

Wow!  Very nice comparison photos there, ksm.  Thank you very much. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on February 16, 2019, 06:10:36 AM
My garlic planted from grocery store cloves is coming up. Radishes almost ready to harvest. Peas, Swiss chard, mustard greens, and onions all sprouting. It will be time for tomato planting soon. I’m trying a variety bred to grow in north Florida this year.

Send your thoughts and prayers that I can get datil peppers to grow this year.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 16, 2019, 02:57:12 PM
My garlic planted from grocery store cloves is coming up. Radishes almost ready to harvest. Peas, Swiss chard, mustard greens, and onions all sprouting. It will be time for tomato planting soon. I’m trying a variety bred to grow in north Florida this year.

Send your thoughts and prayers that I can get datil peppers to grow this year.

OK, I have prayed for your success at growing the datil peppers, and if indeed you can get them to grow, I will envy you because they sound delicious.  The trouble is, I can no longer consume hot peppers because they cause a certain type of reaction to occur inside of me.  (Not digestive, oddly enough.)  Have you given any thought as to trying to grow the peppers in pots?  I have had some success there, as opposed to growing them in the ground.

I came across another fruit and vegetable label that is more appropriate here in the garden thread.  Especially showing tulips, which are starting to sprout here in the Pacific Northwest.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 18, 2019, 10:23:57 PM
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I stepped out onto the front yard earlier this week and found a yellow crocus growing there.


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About three days later, a second one popped up.  But that's it, just the two of them.  I have never planted crocus, but I'm thinking about doing so, next fall.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on February 19, 2019, 04:21:19 AM
Eating from my first crop of radishes now.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 19, 2019, 04:42:02 AM
Eating from my first crop of radishes now.

Yum!  Good going, juan.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 20, 2019, 11:25:20 PM
The skies over EllGab Garden - Pacific Northwest have been mostly cloudy with periods of rain and light snow.  But last week I left the garden to take a walk under what I believe is called, a Buttermilk Sky.  I snapped a picture of it.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 23, 2019, 08:54:52 PM
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As the title on this postcard states, these are Blue Bonnets, the official state flower for all EllGab Gardens in the state of Texas.  They will be blooming in the springtime. 
https://www.wildflower.org/learn/how-to/grow-bluebonnets
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 27, 2019, 01:20:40 PM
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I was going to post this fruit crate label in the fruit crate label thread but it seems better suited for the EllGab Garden thread, so here it is.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldenrod
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 28, 2019, 01:07:03 PM
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Some Southern Magnolia flowers from down there in Dixie.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnolia_grandiflora
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 01, 2019, 05:25:36 PM
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This postcard shows a W Atlee Burpee's Co Seeds catalog from 1818.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 02, 2019, 07:11:12 PM
The EllGab Garden is looking a bit drab of late.  We had some snow and rain and the garden is muddy and colorless.  For that reason I escaped into the house and watched a colorful Mardi Gras parade.  Here are some screen caps from last night's Krewe d'Etat parade. 

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 04, 2019, 10:30:18 PM
Some scenes from the Krewe of Proteus parade at Mardi Gras.

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 07, 2019, 12:56:06 AM
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An ad for garden seeds in the March 7, 1919 issue of the Grants Pass Daily Courier.  Courtesy of the Library of Congress.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 07, 2019, 06:58:53 PM
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Here is a closeup picture of my Mardi Gras crocus, so named because it popped up in my front yard around about the middle of the Mardi Gras festivities.  In addition to that, purple just happens to be one of the official colors of Mardi Gras. 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on March 07, 2019, 07:04:03 PM
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Here is a closeup picture of my Mardi Gras crocus, so named because it popped up in my front yard around about the middle of the Mardi Gras festivities.  In addition to that, purple just happens to be one of the official colors of Mardi Gras.

Nice pic Rikki
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 13, 2019, 08:28:56 PM
Nice pic Rikki

Glad you liked the picture, Gravity.  Thank you.  I surprised myself with that closeup pic.  Usually when I hold the camera out without seeing what I'm aiming at, I tend to move and get a blurry picture, but I got lucky that time.  Crocus aren't all that big.  Here is a pic showing that same crocus, as I am standing over it, looking down.  That's it in the very center of the picture, and there isn't much left to see of it as it is dwindling away.  I'm hoping to see it again, next year.

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I've got some periwinkle flowers growing in the back EllGab garden.  Not many though...tons of creeping vines and leaves but only a few flowers here and there.  I wonder if the scarcity of flowers means an extra hot summer coming up, or an extra cold one?  I guess we'll see.

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Here is a closeup of one of the flowers:

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Some interesting facts about periwinkle flowers: http://www.gardeningcentral.org/periwinkle_flowers/periwinkle_flowers.html



 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: KSM32 on March 14, 2019, 01:45:53 AM
I don't know if this picture falls within the threads guidelines but in the case that it gives anybody an ideas on yard framing, it's worth it.  The mulch around our little "dinner deck" is a rubber mixture from Lowes made of recycled tires and rubber products. It's easy to walk on and comes in a few different colors. BTW the area you're looking at is the result of 35 bags...……  Man, I wish they would pack them in bigger bags.  Although!!  I did use the plastic bags as an underlayment to stop any weeds or grass from growing through.

I'm shitfaced and I have to work in the morning so you better appreciate this. Goodnight.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 14, 2019, 01:54:11 AM
I don't know if this picture falls within the threads guidelines but in the case that it gives anybody an ideas on yard framing, it's worth it.  The mulch around our little "dinner deck" is a rubber mixture from Lowes made of recycled tires and rubber products. It's easy to walk on and comes in a few different colors. BTW the area you're looking at is the result of 35 bags...……  Man, I wish they would pack them in bigger bags.  Although!!  I did use the plastic bags as an underlayment to stop any weeds or grass from growing through.

I'm shitfaced and I have to work in the morning so you better appreciate this. Goodnight.

It fits in like Flint!  Good thinking on utilizing the plastic bags to keep weeds from growing.  Thank you, KSM.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on March 14, 2019, 01:58:18 AM
I don't know if this picture falls within the threads guidelines but in the case that it gives anybody an ideas on yard framing, it's worth it.  The mulch around our little "dinner deck" is a rubber mixture from Lowes made of recycled tires and rubber products. It's easy to walk on and comes in a few different colors. BTW the area you're looking at is the result of 35 bags...……  Man, I wish they would pack them in bigger bags.  Although!!  I did use the plastic bags as an underlayment to stop any weeds or grass from growing through.

I'm shitfaced and I have to work in the morning so you better appreciate this. Goodnight.

The end of that second deck board from the right doesn’t lay flush with the sideboard.

p.s. @Sofia pm’d me to say you should have used 37 bags of mulch.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: 26 horses on March 14, 2019, 04:38:04 PM
I don't know if this picture falls within the threads guidelines but in the case that it gives anybody an ideas on yard framing, it's worth it.  The mulch around our little "dinner deck" is a rubber mixture from Lowes made of recycled tires and rubber products. It's easy to walk on and comes in a few different colors. BTW the area you're looking at is the result of 35 bags...……  Man, I wish they would pack them in bigger bags.  Although!!  I did use the plastic bags as an underlayment to stop any weeds or grass from growing through.

I'm shitfaced and I have to work in the morning so you better appreciate this. Goodnight.

Sweet - actual redwood (some cracks) or is it Trex ?
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: KSM32 on March 14, 2019, 07:32:21 PM
Sweet - actual redwood (some cracks) or is it Trex ?
Trex, and I've spaced the planks 3/8" apart for ventilation. I hate the side vents on some decks..  or perhaps just my dads old decks. He was a butcher!
I've dropped two SD memory cards between those tiny spaces as well as numerous guitar picks and coins. Probably could have slipped that fkn pickle through there too.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on March 14, 2019, 07:44:59 PM
Trex, and I've spaced the planks 3/8" apart for ventilation. I hate the side vents on some decks..  or perhaps just my dads old decks. He was a butcher!
I've dropped two SD memory cards between those tiny spaces as well as numerous guitar picks and coins. Probably could have slipped that fkn pickle through there too.


John Prine wrote a song for you and your wife.

Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: KSM32 on March 14, 2019, 08:28:11 PM
@GravitySucks  That, is actually a very nice song and who couldn't like a stand-up bass :) I actually paused Break On Through for it. And now back to Ze Doors.


Not like you need it:: +1
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on March 14, 2019, 08:39:15 PM
@GravitySucks  That, is actually a very nice song and who couldn't like a stand-up bass :) I actually paused Break On Through for it. And now back to Ze Doors.


Not like you need it:: +1

I thought you would like it. It made me cry a little in my good eye.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 15, 2019, 12:01:39 AM
From the book  "American Honey Plants; together with those which are of special value to the beekeeper as sources of pollen" 1919

I wish I had a plant like this.  I love plants that attract bees.
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No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/   

Fat chance to get one of these to grow on the west coast.   Apparently, they like to grow in the southeastern parts of the United States.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_filamentosa
 
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: GravitySucks on March 15, 2019, 12:28:40 AM
From the book  "American Honey Plants; together with those which are of special value to the beekeeper as sources of pollen" 1919

I wish I had a plant like this.  I love plants that attract bees.
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No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/   

Fat chance to get one of these to grow on the west coast.   Apparently, they like to grow in the southeastern parts of the United States.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca_filamentosa

They are really pretty when they bloom. I see them along fence lines in the country all the time.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: MAX on March 15, 2019, 04:14:45 AM

John Prine wrote a song for you and your wife.



I am a fan of Prine, he is a classic. We are going to his music festival in November in the Dominican Republic. Good Times.
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 16, 2019, 08:35:24 PM
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Some blooming oleanders in Florida.  That state certainly does have its share of colorful plants.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerium
Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 18, 2019, 01:29:42 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Pensacola Journal., March 18, 1919. 

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Title: Re: The EllGab Garden
Post by: juan on March 18, 2019, 05:25:12 AM
OMG, that cartoonis racist, sexist, ageist, and animalist all in one. Isn’t 21st Century mentality wonderful.