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General Stuff => Random Topics => Topic started by: Rikki Gins on July 09, 2018, 01:01:54 AM

Title: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 09, 2018, 01:01:54 AM
Special thanks to Bart Ell for making this great site available so that we can continue with the 100 Years Ago thread.


From the Imperial War Museum, July 9, 1918.

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Close up of a front gunner's cockpit of a French Caudron twin engined biplane at the Villacoublay aerodrome, 9 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307781 © IWM (Q 58598)


 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WOTR on July 09, 2018, 02:16:13 AM
Good to see you Rikki.  I'm sorry that all of your articles at the other place seem to be lost to history (again.)  But lots of us read them and enjoyed a dose of history from not so long ago...

I was a little concerned that you either would not make it, or would decide it was not worth continuing the threads.  Nice to see you here and posting.  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 09, 2018, 04:02:12 AM
Good to see you Rikki.  I'm sorry that all of your articles at the other place seem to be lost to history (again.)  But lots of us read them and enjoyed a dose of history from not so long ago...

I was a little concerned that you either would not make it, or would decide it was not worth continuing the threads.  Nice to see you here and posting.  :)

And I am very glad to see you once again WOTR.  Dave S. mentioned during his show that everyone was gathering at Bart's site and for that I am grateful.  I am very happy to start the history thread up again and yes, the older thread may be gone with the wind but that's okay.  I treat the thread like a hobby and speaking of which, I recall one where as a kid, I used to assemble and paint plastic car models.  I spent a lot of time making them as authentic as possible and accumulated a big boxful of them.  Well, one day when I was out of the house, my mom gave the box of models to a kid that had lost his dad.  There was really nothing I could do but shrug my shoulders and start in making some more car models.  I guess it's the same here.  I am very glad that you and some others enjoy the thread.  I will try to make it as interesting as it was before.  :)         
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: ShayP on July 09, 2018, 09:28:17 AM
Good to see this thread again!   8)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: ShayP on July 09, 2018, 09:33:04 AM
By 1918, about half of the cars the United States were Model T's, also called "flivvers." A runabout version that seated two people cost $500.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: ShayP on July 09, 2018, 09:46:59 AM
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Mary Pickford was called "America's Sweetheart" and the "girl with the curls."  The silent film star attracted a huge fan base. All of that hair was typical of the "Gibson Girl" archetype that women emulated during the turn of the century.

In August 1918, Pickford's contract expired with Paramount Pictures, she was offered $250,000 to leave the motion picture business by Adolph Zukor who was the founder.  She declined, and went to First National Pictures, which agreed to her terms.  In 1919, Pickford, along with D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, and Douglas Fairbanks, formed the independent film production company United Artists.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 01:34:23 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 10, 1918.


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An American gas sentry outside shelter at Watou, 10 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308489 © IWM (Q 60980)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 01:49:51 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, July 10, 1918.


WAITERS ARRESTED FOR USING "MICKY FINN'

  Chicago, July 10. Ten waiters and officials of the waiter union were indicted here today as a result of the investigation showing that persons, who had slighted the waiters in giving tips, had been drugged with "Micky Finn" emetic powders.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 10, 2018, 02:44:32 PM
By 1918, about half of the cars the United States were Model T's, also called "flivvers." A runabout version that seated two people cost $500.

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I hope that guy on the right doesn't accidentally take a step backwards without looking!!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 02:47:20 PM
I hope that guy on the right doesn't accidentally take a step backwards without looking!!

No kidding.  Also what is the guy wearing the straw hat doing?  He looks kind of suspicious.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 10, 2018, 02:48:56 PM
No kidding.  Also what is the guy wearing the straw hat doing?  He looks kind of suspicious.

Yeah, like he is making a get away or hiding from someone. Or is that Buster Keaton doing a stunt?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: spacegirl on July 10, 2018, 04:45:08 PM
. . . you knew it'd be SPACE-related:

1918

Using mostly the sixty-inch (diameter mirror telescope) marvel at Mt. Wilson (pictured below) [Fig. 2] , Harlow Shapley (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlow_Shapley) discovered that "the solar system is off center and consequently man is too." 

He had mapped out the positions and distances of objects called "globular clusters" and determined them to enclose the center of the galaxy in a rough sphere — at the outer edge of which Earth is camped [Fig. 1].

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Figure 1

Soon these observations, buttressed by Vesto Slipher, at Mt. Lowell, then hugely amplified by Edwin Hubble and Milton Humason in 1925 would free more minds from religion than Darwin's work half a century before.

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Figure 2



*the staff were still working out the kinks with the newly completed one-hundred-inch.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 10, 2018, 07:15:13 PM
No kidding.  Also what is the guy wearing the straw hat doing?  He looks kind of suspicious.

Well. Well.  Rix Gins made it! Just in disguise a bit.  It is good to have you here at Ellgab - very good!   

If you want to see what the dude in the straw hat is up to, you will just have to watch the movie.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 07:16:21 PM
Cool info, spacegirl.  Here is a pic of the 60 inch mirror being hauled up the mountain to the observatory back in 1917.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 10, 2018, 07:20:17 PM
Well. Well.  Rix Gins made it! Just in disguise a bit.  It is good to have you here at Ellgab - very good!   

If you want to see what the dude in the straw hat is up to, you will just have to watch the movie.




Yes! I was thinking Harold Lloyd but typed Buster Keaton (though it could be him also. They sorta have similar look and such.)  ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: spacegirl on July 10, 2018, 07:24:07 PM
Cool info, spacegirl.  Here is a pic of the 60 inch mirror being hauled up the mountain to the observatory back in 1917.

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Yes!  And look closely . . .

they were Mack trucks.   ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 07:24:44 PM
Well. Well.  Rix Gins made it! Just in disguise a bit.  It is good to have you here at Ellgab - very good!   

If you want to see what the dude in the straw hat is up to, you will just have to watch the movie.



Hi Walks.  Yes, I lurked for awhile before signing up, just like I did with BellGab.  Great to see you again, too. 

The straw hat.  Of course!  Harold Lloyd.  I will watch it to see what Harold is up to, and to see if that worker falls into the manhole.  Thanks.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 10, 2018, 07:27:12 PM
Yes!  And look closely . . .

they were Mack trucks.   ;D

Ha!  Indeed they were.  Thanks for posting on this thread.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 10, 2018, 07:31:17 PM
Hi Walks.  Yes, I lurked for awhile before signing up, just like I did with BellGab.  Great to see you again, too. 

The straw hat.  Of course!  Harold Lloyd.  I will watch it to see what Harold is up to, and to see if that worker falls into the manhole.  Thanks.

Straw hats were popular and they even had a system sort of like the club or regimental ties across the pond and at certain universities.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 10, 2018, 07:36:25 PM
Hi Walks.  Yes, I lurked for awhile before signing up, just like I did with BellGab.  Great to see you again, too. 

The straw hat.  Of course!  Harold Lloyd.  I will watch it to see what Harold is up to, and to see if that worker falls into the manhole.  Thanks.

You bet.  After I finished off the 100 years ago automotive section at the old place, I got a little burned out and slid into the mire of
the Falkie and Dietrich threads.  I'm thinking about cleaning up my act.  I'll probably contribute some here and am toying with the idea of starting something similar to the aviation thread.  We'll see how it goes.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: spacegirl on July 10, 2018, 07:39:13 PM
Straw hats were popular and they even had a system sort of like the club or regimental ties across the pond and at certain universities.

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They were seasonal, as I recall.  One of my favorite bits of obsolete slang is, "a good summer straw."
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 10, 2018, 07:48:11 PM
They were seasonal, as I recall.  One of my favorite bits of obsolete slang is, "a good summer straw."

Yep, that "tradition" is still sorta of carried on by cowboys etc though it is more to do with practicality and not fashion (though some places maybe for fashion.) Straw hat being cooler and still keeping sun off but ventilated and felt hat being warmer and both keeping sun, snow, or rain etc off of you.

There have been riots and violence due to fashion faux paus!  WTF? Roaming about attacking people with nailed sticks because they still wore straw out of season? Damn now I got to remember that deal about "white", something to do with Labor and Memorial Day? Lest I get attacked by a roving gang....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_Hat_Riot    :o ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: spacegirl on July 10, 2018, 07:51:43 PM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_Hat_Riot    :o ;D

And I thought all the good band names were used up already.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 10, 2018, 07:58:42 PM
Yep, that "tradition" is still sorta of carried on by cowboys etc though it is more to do with practicality and not fashion (though some places maybe for fashion.) Straw hat being cooler and still keeping sun off but ventilated and felt hat being warmer and both keeping sun, snow, or rain etc off of you.

There have been riots and violence due to fashion faux paus!  WTF? Roaming about attacking people with nailed sticks because they still wore straw out of season? Damn now I got to remember that deal about "white", something to do with Labor and Memorial Day? Lest I get attacked by a roving gang....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_Hat_Riot    :o ;D

That's a  hoot.  Check this out:
" The more innocuous stomping turned into a brawl when the youths tried to stomp a group of dock workers' hats, and the dock workers fought back"

Who starts a rumble with Longshoremen over hats?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 11, 2018, 02:20:04 AM
Enrico Caruso sings "Over There" first in English and then in French.  Recorded 100 years ago today.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 11, 2018, 10:57:15 AM
Enrico Caruso sings "Over There" first in English and then in French.  Recorded 100 years ago today.



Mario Lanza played him in a movie. Jeff Rense has a site about Lanza and apparently is a huge fan.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: K_Dubb on July 11, 2018, 11:07:11 AM
Yep, that "tradition" is still sorta of carried on by cowboys etc though it is more to do with practicality and not fashion (though some places maybe for fashion.) Straw hat being cooler and still keeping sun off but ventilated and felt hat being warmer and both keeping sun, snow, or rain etc off of you.

There have been riots and violence due to fashion faux paus!  WTF? Roaming about attacking people with nailed sticks because they still wore straw out of season? Damn now I got to remember that deal about "white", something to do with Labor and Memorial Day? Lest I get attacked by a roving gang....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_Hat_Riot    :o ;D

It's ladies' shoes only between Memorial and Labor Day, unless in a resort area, whatever that is.  Seersucker (and the obligatory white bucks) follows the same rule for gentlemen, I believe.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: spacegirl on July 11, 2018, 11:40:02 AM
Caruso sings

It doesn't matter how many times I read this name, I'll always hear it the way Klaus Kinski said it.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 12, 2018, 01:00:18 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 12, 1918.


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Infantry practicing an attack behind a smoke screen and a tank. Photograph taken at Sautricourt, 12 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245545 © IWM (Q 9819)

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Air mechanics working on wrecked fuselages of reconnaissance aircraft at the aircraft repair depot near Rang du Fliers, 12 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247609 © IWM (Q 12074)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WOTR on July 12, 2018, 01:11:28 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 12, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245545 © IWM (Q 9819)

Those first tanks were quite something.  All new technology.  The "wrap around" tracks just fascinate me.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 12, 2018, 01:55:03 AM
Those first tanks were quite something.  All new technology.  The "wrap around" tracks just fascinate me.

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Oh yes, I really like WWI tanks too.  The British certainly had it over the Germans when it came to tank design.  The German tanks were like slow moving boxcars.  Way too stocky and clumsy.

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A captured German tank.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Kidnostad on July 12, 2018, 11:30:01 AM
Good to see this thread reestablished on EG.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 12, 2018, 05:16:59 PM
100 years ago today, the Imperial Japanese Navy's battleship Kawachi went down in under 4 minutes after an accidental
magazine explosion.   Over 600 sailors went down with her.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 13, 2018, 02:38:33 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 13, 1918.

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The German Spring Offensive. Portuguese gunners receiving instruction from the Royal Garrison Artillery gunners at a 9.2inch howitzer actually in action. Arras, 13 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239689 © IWM (Q 7894)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 13, 2018, 03:14:45 AM
Things that were invented in 1918:

Super heterodyne receiver  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superheterodyne_receiver
French dip sandwich            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_dip
Torque wrench                     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_wrench
Crystal oscillator                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator
Grocery bag                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shopping_bag
Hydraulic brake                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_brake 
Blender                                 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blender
Silica gel                               https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silica_gel
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 13, 2018, 03:29:38 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, July 13, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 14, 2018, 01:46:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 14, 1918.


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British troops cultivating vegetables near Fruges, 14 July 1918. The soldier on the right is a serviceman of the North Staffordshire Regiment. Note a scarecrow in the shape of a German soldier.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244839 © IWM (Q 9054)

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French civilian and a British soldier fishing in the canalized Somme River at Amiens, 14 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247166 © IWM (Q 11583)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 14, 2018, 02:02:52 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 15, 2018, 01:14:38 AM
I had three great uncles who fought in World War One.  Their were Loyd, Lyle and Elmer Head.  They had joined the National Guard in Iowa and they went overseas to France as part of the famous Rainbow Division. The three brothers got to stay together after their arrival in France but Elmer was later transferred elsewhere.

On July 15, 1918, shortly after midnight, the German army attacked the line at Champagne that was held by the Rainbow Division.  Loyd was killed by a high explosive shell during the battle.  The Germans were held off and I read somewhere that they were unable to advance anywhere after this engagement and that it was all backwards for them from that point on.

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Here is a biography that had been written about Loyd by some members of the American Legion Post that had been named after him.  They had written Loyd's name with two L's when he actually only had one L in his first name.




Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 15, 2018, 06:37:48 AM
Thanks for sharing that Rix.  I'm sorry that Great Uncle Loyd never made it home.  The German attack on July 15th, 1918
is known as the Second Battle of the Marne and it was their last gasp in trying to break the French Army.  By July 17th, the French
- supported by Americans, British and Italians stopped the Germans.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 15, 2018, 07:15:54 PM
Thanks, Walks.  I actually got to see my Great Uncle Lyle once.  He was in bed with one of his legs elevated and wrapped up with his foot sticking out and his toes were all blue.  He kept' barking out orders to Mom.  (Probably to keep us howling kids quiet.)  Great Uncle Elmer died in the 1920's from the lingering effects of mustard gas.  Merritt Head elected to have his son's body returned to Greenfield for a full military funeral and three years later, it was.  Merritt (we called him Grandpa Dad) was some type of cement wholesaler.  He supplied all the cement for the Winchester Bridge in Winchester, Oregon.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/douglas/83923401221/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 15, 2018, 08:50:33 PM
Thanks, Walks.  I actually got to see my Great Uncle Lyle once.  He was in bed with one of his legs elevated and wrapped up with his foot sticking out and his toes were all blue.  He kept' barking out orders to Mom.  (Probably to keep us howling kids quiet.)  Great Uncle Elmer died in the 1920's from the lingering effects of mustard gas.  Merritt Head elected to have his son's body returned to Greenfield for a full military funeral and three years later, it was.  Merritt (we called him Grandpa Dad) was some type of cement wholesaler.  He supplied all the cement for the Winchester Bridge in Winchester, Oregon.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/douglas/83923401221/

Interestng stuff!  And cool to build something that lasts. That bridge site is awesome! I looked up.a bunch of old bridges I was trying to recall details on. Thanks!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 15, 2018, 09:55:45 PM
Interestng stuff!  And cool to build something that lasts. That bridge site is awesome! I looked up.a bunch of old bridges I was trying to recall details on. Thanks!

Glad you liked the website on bridges, mr. a.  Enjoy!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WhiteCrow on July 15, 2018, 10:05:19 PM
Good to see this thread reestablished on EG.

Yes! Thank you Mr Gins
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WhiteCrow on July 15, 2018, 10:26:13 PM
Going to Oshkosh  EAA later this month

Seeing and hearing the War Birds is worth the admission price. Anyone else going?

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 16, 2018, 02:57:39 AM
Yes! Thank you Mr Gins

My pleasure!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 16, 2018, 02:57:50 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 16, 2018, 01:18:21 PM


I wonder if Rick has read "The Creature From Jekyll Island?" He was going a bit C2C guest there for a bit. G. Edward Griffin should come in to try to pawn first editions of the book.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 16, 2018, 01:46:19 PM
I wonder if Rick has read "The Creature From Jekyll Island?" He was going a bit C2C guest there for a bit. G. Edward Griffin should come in to try to pawn first editions of the book.

From what I've been told, Rick and the other personalities have long since ceased working there, and they only appear (except for Old Man RIP) for the televised segments which as you can tell from the clip, are heavily edited.  I had a friend that went there once, and he said  that they have security people there making sure that you don't take pictures, etc.  Also, that they close the place up when actual filming is being done.  That's what he claimed, anyway.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 16, 2018, 02:38:59 PM
From what I've been told, Rick and the other personalities have long since ceased working there, and they only appear (except for Old Man RIP) for the televised segments which as you can tell from the clip, are heavily edited.  I had a friend that went there once, and he said  that they have security people there making sure that you don't take pictures, etc.  Also, that they close the place up when actual filming is being done.  That's what he claimed, anyway.

Like a lot of "reality" shows that aren't reality. I'm pretty sure "Antiques Roadshow" is legitimate.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 16, 2018, 02:46:53 PM
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Rodolf Heuchele


Son of deceased Master Carpenter Heuchlel of Hienheim.  (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidenheim_an_der_Brenz)

Sergeant with the Bavarian Pioneer Company.

Holder of the Iron Cross, first and second class, and the Merit Cross with Swords.

Killed by high explosive shell fragments on July 15, 1918 after 40 months of true, soldierly service.

He was 24 years old.

 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 17, 2018, 01:31:49 AM
Remember the RMS Carpathia?  That was the ship that rescued 705 passengers after the sinking of the Titanic.  Well, the Carpathia herself was sunk on July 17, 1918 after being hit by three torpedoes from the German U-boat U-55.  There were 57 passengers on board and 166 crewmen, five of which perished.

Info on the Carpathia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Carpathia

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Photo of RMS Carpathia.
By Unknown - americanhistory.si.edu, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18976829
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 17, 2018, 02:07:49 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 17, 2018, 10:44:46 AM
Remember the RMS Carpathia?  That was the ship that rescued 705 passengers after the sinking of the Titanic.  Well, the Carpathia herself was sunk on July 17, 1918 after being hit by three torpedoes from the German U-boat U-55.  There were 57 passengers on board and 166 crewmen, five of which perished.

Info on the Carpathia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Carpathia

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Photo of RMS Carpathia.
By Unknown - americanhistory.si.edu, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18976829
Titanic or Olympic?

https://theunredacted.com/titanic-conspiracy-the-ship-that-never-sank/

https://www.history.com/news/5-things-you-may-not-know-about-titanics-rescue-ship

"while serving as chief officer on Campania in 1907, Rostron claimed to have sighted a sea serpent, which he later wrote about in detail in his memoir “Home from the Sea.” "
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 17, 2018, 02:07:32 PM
Titanic or Olympic?

https://theunredacted.com/titanic-conspiracy-the-ship-that-never-sank/

https://www.history.com/news/5-things-you-may-not-know-about-titanics-rescue-ship

"while serving as chief officer on Campania in 1907, Rostron claimed to have sighted a sea serpent, which he later wrote about in detail in his memoir “Home from the Sea.” "

Ha, remember on the other gab site when the stranded U-boat crew were captured and claimed their sub had been disabled by a sea creature?

I hadn't heard of the ship switching and there are some odd coincidences there, but..... 

The Californian had nothing but survival blankets for cargo?  That's odd because in the movies (my only source, I'm man enough to admit) the Californian was doing anything but being on standby to rescue the sinking Titanic.  They had in fact, missed receiving the first SOS calls and they had also switched off their telegraph connection (because it was beddy-by time) just minutes after the Titanic started to sink. 

Didn't the Captain and crew in the Titanic go down with the ship?  If so, then they were giving their company total dedication and service because if it wasn't them that rammed the "Olympic" into the iceberg, then who did?

Finally, I don't think that four or five people could have the time to repaint the ship names and switch all of the named items (thousands of plates, napkins,  name plates in rooms, etc) in two gigantic passenger liners without notice.  I say four or five people because it would take that few people to keep such a thing a secret, even back in 1918.  Those sister ships were big and I think a large crew of switcherwooers would have been needed to accomplish the task.  Though nowhere has anybody come across a diary from Aunt Jane or a journal from Uncle Charly that shows they were part of a secret ploy to switch ships.  People are people and there are always a few who can't resist leaving a record that they played a part in some type of nefarious plot.

But, in the immortal words of Fats Waller:  "One never knows, do one?"       
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 17, 2018, 06:40:17 PM
As Rix mentioned earlier   July 16-17th is the 100 year anniversary of the slaughtering of Nicholas II, his family and his entourage. 

Here is the room in Ipatiev Place where the murders took place:
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The building where this took place was torn down and in 2003 the Church on Blood in Honour of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land was
opened - the altar stands at the exact spot where Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra, their daughters Olga, Maria, Tatiana, Anastasia and their son Alexia died.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 17, 2018, 06:50:33 PM
Here is a nice project called Romanovs100 that has lots of photos of the Tsar and his family. 

https://www.instagram.com/romanovs100/

I especially like this picture of Grand Duchess Maria:
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It would take a cold blooded communist indeed to shoot her in the head...................
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on July 17, 2018, 06:52:38 PM
If you are the type that likes to go on Cruises the Norwegian Pearl's main dining room is called The Summer Palace and his dedicated
to the Romanov's

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 17, 2018, 07:08:16 PM
Fascinating info and pics there, Walks.  I posted this video once before, in the older gab place:

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 18, 2018, 02:02:44 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 18, 1918.


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A battery of French 75 mm field artillery guns in action at Longpont, 18 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084378 © IWM (Q 47947)

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French Chasseurs cyclists resting during a halt during the attack in the forest of Villers-Cotterets, 18 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205322846 © IWM (Q 78084)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 18, 2018, 03:28:49 AM
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Wolfgang Henslmeier


Economist from Schiltern.

Army stretcher Bearer and Orderly with the 2nd Bavarian Field Hospital.

Holder of the Bavarian Military Service Cross with Crown and Swords, and the Long Service Medal.

Died after a short illness in Weiler in the Elsass, on July 17, 1918.

He was 39 years old.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 18, 2018, 04:49:51 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, July 18, 1918.


Guy Spencer Died Serving In France

Mrs. A. C. Spencer received the following telegram this morning from her son  Lieut. Donald Spencer who is in France:  "Guy died today.  Pneumonia.  Will care for him.  Donald."

The news of the death of this Ashland young man has come as a great shock to his parents and relatives as this was the first tidings they had that he had been ill.  He was a member of Company E. 64th regiment and went with that regiment to France last spring.  It is not known definitely where he had been stationed but is supposed he was in Limoges where were a number of Ashland boys.

Guy Spencer is one of three sons of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Spencer who are serving their country overseas.  The others are Lieut. Donald Spencer with the 65th regiment and I. M. Spencer with the 218th engineers. 

The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the aged father and mother who have given their boy at the call of his country.

(Note:  One has to wonder, is the specter of the 1918 Spanish Flu Epidemic raising it's deadly head?)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 18, 2018, 09:41:40 PM
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Josef Flingelli


Army Infantryman with 10 Company, 13th Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment from Walching.

Killed on July 18, 1918, by Reims.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reims

He was 21 years old.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 19, 2018, 01:16:38 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 19, 1918.


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The armory of the 149th Night Bombing Squadron at their aerodrome near St. Omer, 19 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247622 © IWM (Q 12087)

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An officer of the 444th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA), smokes a pipe as he supervises a kitten balancing on a 12 inch gun shell near Arras, 19 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205212905 © IWM (Q 6860)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 19, 2018, 01:34:06 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 20, 2018, 02:34:49 AM
Singer - songwriter Cindy Walker was born on July 20, 1918.

Bio of Cindy Walker: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cindy_Walker




Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 21, 2018, 01:25:41 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 21, 1918.


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Queen Mary and Sir Eric Geddes, First Lord of the Admiralty, at the private view of the Exhibition of Naval Photographs at Princes Galleries, Piccadilly, 21st July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205254002 © IWM (Q 19623)

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King George V, Queen Mary, Queen Alexandra, Deighton Probyn, Keeper of the Privy Purse, and Petty Officer Ernest Pitcher at the private view of the Exhibition of Naval Photographs at Princes Galleries, Piccadilly, 21st July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194759 © IWM (Q 19625)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 21, 2018, 01:46:01 AM


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Trip_to_Mars
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 22, 2018, 01:18:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 22, 1918.


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The Canadian journalists riding through the forest of Conches on a light railway during their visit to the Canadian Forestry Corps, 22 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244890 © IWM (Q 9105)

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The Canadian journalists watching a passing light railway train loaded with logs during their visit to the Canadian Forestry Corps at Conches Forest, 22 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244901 © IWM (Q 9116)

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The Canadian journalists with General Simon Fraser, the 14th Lord Lovat and 3rd Baron Lovat at the Canadian Forestry Corps Saw-Mill in the Forest of Conches. Note German prisoners working. 22 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244894 © IWM (Q 9109)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 22, 2018, 01:49:45 AM
Marion Harris (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Harris) recorded the song 'After You've Gone' on July 22, 1918.



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 23, 2018, 12:27:34 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 23, 1918.


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Battle of Tardenois. British (62nd Division) and French soldiers in action in Bois de Reims, 23 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246732 © IWM (Q 11110)

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Battle of Tardenois. Stretcher-bearers of 2/20th Battalion, London Regiment (Blackheath and Woolwich), 62nd Division and a German prisoner bringing in a British wounded while a French ration-carrying party is going up.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216494 © IWM (Q 11098)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 23, 2018, 12:55:36 AM
Professional baseball player Pee Wee Reese was born on July 23, 1918.

Biography of Pee Wee Reese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pee_Wee_Reese
Quote
Reese's nickname originated in his childhood, as he was a champion marbles player (a "pee wee" is a small marble).

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Pee Wee Reese displayed in a trading card manufactured by the Bowman Gum Company.
By Unknown - Heritage Auctions, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46887530
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 24, 2018, 12:46:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 24, 1918.


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Officers of the 2nd Battalion, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, 62nd Division, conferring with French and Italian officers in the Bois de Reims during the Battle of Tardenois, 24 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205231562 © IWM (Q 11113)

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British and French troops with a Renault FT-17 tank in the Bois de Reims during the Battle of Tardenois, 24 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216447 © IWM (Q 11120)

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Battle of Tardenois. Men of the 1/5th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment (185th Brigade, 62nd Division) taking captive a German prisoner in the Bois de Reims, 24 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216493 © IWM (Q 11086)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 24, 2018, 01:07:30 AM
Violinist Ruggiero Ricci was born on July 24, 1918.

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruggiero_Ricci



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 24, 2018, 11:18:25 AM
Professional baseball player Pee Wee Reese was born on July 23, 1918.

Biography of Pee Wee Reese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pee_Wee_Reese
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Pee Wee Reese displayed in a trading card manufactured by the Bowman Gum Company.
By Unknown - Heritage Auctions, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46887530

You think they had Pee Wee hold one of those novelty, give-away small bats for the photo?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 24, 2018, 01:34:19 PM
You think they had Pee Wee hold one of those novelty, give-away small bats for the photo?

Ha, I hadn't noticed but you are right.  Pee Wee would have been ahead of his time if he had used it for self defense, or had wrapped barb wire around it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 25, 2018, 01:26:22 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 25, 1918.
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Troops of the American 326th Regiment moving forward German trenches at Choloy, 25 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215778 © IWM (Q 70733)


From the U.S. National Archives, July 25, 1918.

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Manufacturing airplanes for the government by Dayton-Wright Airplane Company. Completed plane on exhibition.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/35740357@N03/5506534874 Access Restrictions: Unrestricted. Use Restrictions: Unrestricted.
No known copyright restrictions.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 25, 2018, 01:56:41 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, July 25, 1918.


Klamath Falls Boy Obtains Souvenirs

  According to the Klamath Falls Herald, Mrs. Nate Otterhein is the proud possessor of a unique souvenir in the shape of a pair of vases made from shells of the famous French "75" guns now being used with such deadly execution against the Boche forces in France.

  Some time ago a letter from her son, Louis Hoagland, with the aviation forces now in France, notified her that the souvenirs were on the way, and further said that the shells were used in the greatest battle of the war up to that time. He also informed her that he had received his service stripe for six months foreign service, and expressed the hope that before he was entitled to another one the argument would be settled and he would be on the way back home.
 
  Louis Hoagland is a grandson of Mrs. A. L. Harvey of this city.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 25, 2018, 03:56:49 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, July 25, 1918.


Klamath Falls Boy Obtains Souvenirs

  According to the Klamath Falls Herald, Mrs. Nate Otterhein is the proud possessor of a unique souvenir in the shape of a pair of vases made from shells of the famous French "75" guns now being used with such deadly execution against the Boche forces in France.

  Some time ago a letter from her son, Louis Hoagland, with the aviation forces now in France, notified her that the souvenirs were on the way, and further said that the shells were used in the greatest battle of the war up to that time. He also informed her that he had received his service stripe for six months foreign service, and expressed the hope that before he was entitled to another one the argument would be settled and he would be on the way back home.
 
  Louis Hoagland is a grandson of Mrs. A. L. Harvey of this city.

I wonder if he is related to RCH?

"Boche is an abbreviation of caboche, (compare bochon, an abbreviation of cabochon). This is a recognized French word used familiarly for "head," especially a big, thick head, ("slow-pate"). It is derived from the Latin word caput and the suffix oceus. Boche seems to have been used first in the underworld of Paris about 1860, with the meaning of a disagreeable, troublesome fellow. In the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 it was not applied to the Germans, but soon afterward it was applied by the Parisian printers to their German assistants because of the reputed slowness of comprehension of these foreign printers. The epithet then used was tête de boche, which had the meaning of tête carrée d'Allemand (German blockhead or imbécile). The next step was to apply boche to Germans in general."
-Peter Wehle. "Die Wiener Gaunersprache", 1977, p. 79

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 25, 2018, 07:02:59 PM
I wonder if he is related to RCH?

"Boche is an abbreviation of caboche, (compare bochon, an abbreviation of cabochon). This is a recognized French word used familiarly for "head," especially a big, thick head, ("slow-pate"). It is derived from the Latin word caput and the suffix oceus. Boche seems to have been used first in the underworld of Paris about 1860, with the meaning of a disagreeable, troublesome fellow. In the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 it was not applied to the Germans, but soon afterward it was applied by the Parisian printers to their German assistants because of the reputed slowness of comprehension of these foreign printers. The epithet then used was tête de boche, which had the meaning of tête carrée d'Allemand (German blockhead or imbécile). The next step was to apply boche to Germans in general."
-Peter Wehle. "Die Wiener Gaunersprache", 1977, p. 79

I see a vague resemblance to Richard in the eyes and nose.  Plus Louis is sporting an odd hairstyle...does that sort of thing get passed on through heridity?  Photoshop Richard's beard onto Louis' clean shaven face and I think we might have something.

Nice info on the word Boche.  Pronouinced Bosh, rhyms with wash, right?  The doughboys also liked to refer to the Germans as being 'The Dutch.'  I never could figure that one out.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 27, 2018, 01:29:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 27, 1918.


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American troops playing craps game at Camp Flowerdown, Winchester, 27 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215776 © IWM (Q 70731)

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American and British officers resting at the officers' club at the Flowerdown Camp at Winchester, 27 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165364 © IWM (Q 72742)


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 27, 2018, 01:49:11 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, July 27, 1918.


DOPE FIEND AT AUSTIN TRIES TO HANG HIMSELF

  Roger Rutherford, who has been in the county jail in Austin about three weeks, serving a term for petty larceny, made a second attempt at self destruction Thursday afternoon. Rutherford is said to have been a drug user and it was that which caused his downfall. The rope for the job had been made by the prisoner from the pillow slip from his bed. He was committed to the insane asylum. Austin Reveille.

Roger had been in trouble before.  This from the May 1st 1916 Tonopah Bonanza:

RUTHERFORD GOES TO PRISON

  Roger M. Rutherford, alias George Walace, was sent back to the state prison at Carson City last Tuesday under charge of John Lacey, a guard from the prison. A telegram to Sheriff Crain from Warden Dlckerson last Monday stated that the board of pardons had revoked Rutherford's parole and instructed the sheriff to turn him over to Guard Lacy for return to the prison to serve out the balance of his old sentence. Ely Record.



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 28, 2018, 12:39:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 28, 1918.


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Brigadier General Benjamin Foulois of the US Air Force in a Liberty aircraft at Colombey-les-Belles, 28 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315718 © IWM (Q 70311)

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French Renault FT-17 tanks resting after an attack near Grisolles, 28 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307484 © IWM (Q 58238)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 28, 2018, 01:06:56 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 29, 2018, 01:30:35 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 29, 1918.

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First Lieutenant A. B. Alexander (pilot) and Second Lieutenant E. McLennen (observer) starting on a flight in a Breguet biplane. Amanty, 29 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205306146 © IWM (Q 56647)

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Battle of Tardenois. Troops of the 8th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (62nd Division) moving back from the front line after they had captured Montaigne de Bligny hill, 29 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246715 © IWM (Q 11090)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 29, 2018, 02:27:03 AM
From the Library of Congress, July 29, 1918.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza:

PRO GERMAN GRABBED WHILE MAKING TALK

  Bert Steinberger, lessee of the Casino, may have a German name, but he has nothing of the German nature as he is a 100 per cent American and wants everybody to know that before they set foot in his house. This afternoon Pete Kristich, who had been reading the bulletins and imbibing Dutch courage, floated into the Casino and engaged in a war talk during the course of which he remarked that he hoped the Kaiser would win the war and that he would win it anyhow. How much further he would have gone with his assertions and predictions remains unknown, for in about ten seconds the stalwart form of Jack Grant, chief of police, who had been summoned by phone, loomed up in front of the bar and Mr. Kristich was lugged off to the town Bastille.


TAKEN TO JAIL TO STOP HEMORRHAGE OF THE NOSE

  Alex M Gibbons, recently released from the county jail, proceeded to celebrate the event in his customary style and was seized with a nose bleed so violently that Chief of Police Jack Grant thought he would be better off back in the old quarters on the hill where he could have medical attention.


EGG FAMINE IN HAWAII

  Honolulu is threatened with an egg famine. Because of the high price of feed Japanese and Chinese poultry men are disposing of their hens. Eggs now are a luxury, selling from 80 to 90 cents a dozen with prices of cold storage eggs, imported from the mainland, almost as high.


IMITATION SHRAPNEL SHOWN ON MIZPAH

  Saturday afternoon frequenters of Mizpah hill and residents along the trail leading to the property of the Tonopah Mining company were treated to an exhibition of war that threw a scare into the district. The powder gang working on the dump which is being shipped to the mill at Millers put in two shots that evidently were too strong for a surface display with the result that rocks as large as a man's head were strewn all over the neighborhood. Some fell on the firehouse and the gymnasium and the water office was peppered as though it was an outpost of Chateau Thierry. Fortunately no damage was done.


The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier:

R.W. DE WITT ESCAPES FROM COUNTY JAIL

  The Josephine county jail was the scene last night of another successful jail break, when R. W. DeWitt, who was held to await the action of the grand jury, escaped through a hole in the brick wall. DeWitt is the man held for the robbery of the Boswell mine near Takilma early in May, when about $6000 in gold was stolen.

  Sheriff Lewis states that DeWitt had outside help, a confederate digging a hole in the brick wall on the Fifth street side of the jail, entering the corridor, picking the lock to the "tank," where DeWitt and four other men were confined, and releasing DeWitt. When the jail was opened this morning everything about the lock was found to be in order, but one prisoner was gone. The other prisoners say that they were awakened shortly before daylight by a scratching noise and the falling of brick, but they were afraid to make any outcry for fear of being shot in their cages.

  Up to the present time there is no clue as to the whereabouts of DeWitt.



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 30, 2018, 02:03:40 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, July 30, 1918.

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A Sopwith Camel biplane of the Royal Flying Corps in flight at Beauval, 30 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028793 © IWM (Q 70046)

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The American Popham panel system of visual aeroplane signalling near Beauval, 30 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308122 © IWM (Q 60568)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 30, 2018, 02:37:47 AM
Austro-Hungarian Air Force fighter pilot Frank Linke-Crawford and American journalist and poet Joyce Kilmer were both killed on July 30, 1918.


Biography of Frank Linke-Crawford: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Linke-Crawford
Quote
His legacy was best described by one of his peers, Julius Arigi, who was the second ranked Austro-Hungarian ace:
"Linke was both a fine flier and a fine man. He gave his men full support and generally ignored the rules about officers and non-officers having little to do with each other. He often gave away victories to other, less experienced pilots. As you can imagine, the feelings of his men for him were quite strong."

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Frank Linke-Crawford
By Official photographer of the Austro-Hungarian army - Official photographer of the Austro-Hungarian army, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47829101


Biography of Joyce Kilmer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joyce_Kilmer
Quote
In the 1940 film, "The Fighting 69th", the role of Sergeant Joyce Kilmer was portrayed by actor Jeffrey Lynn.

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Sgt. Joyce Kilmer, as a member of the Fighting 69th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, c. 1918.
Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=623222

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: 2Lord2Grantham on July 30, 2018, 05:55:57 AM
From the Library of Congress, July 29, 1918.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza:

PRO GERMAN GRABBED WHILE MAKING TALK

  Bert Steinberger, lessee of the Casino, may have a German name, but he has nothing of the German nature as he is a 100 per cent American and wants everybody to know that before they set foot in his house. This afternoon Pete Kristich, who had been reading the bulletins and imbibing Dutch courage, floated into the Casino and engaged in a war talk during the course of which he remarked that he hoped the Kaiser would win the war and that he would win it anyhow. How much further he would have gone with his assertions and predictions remains unknown, for in about ten seconds the stalwart form of Jack Grant, chief of police, who had been summoned by phone, loomed up in front of the bar and Mr. Kristich was lugged off to the town Bastille.


*Archival footage of the arrest
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: K_Dubb on July 30, 2018, 07:38:27 AM
I see a vague resemblance to Richard in the eyes and nose.  Plus Louis is sporting an odd hairstyle...does that sort of thing get passed on through heridity?  Photoshop Richard's beard onto Louis' clean shaven face and I think we might have something.

Nice info on the word Boche.  Pronouinced Bosh, rhyms with wash, right?  The doughboys also liked to refer to the Germans as being 'The Dutch.'  I never could figure that one out.

It is because Germans call themselves Deutsch for the same reason the Dutch do -- in English, they all used to be Dutch.  It's the same old word meaning "the people" and, linguistically at least, they are part of the same continuum from what used to be called High Dutch to Low Dutch (the "high" and "low" referring purely to topography rather than status, the mountainous interior of Europe vs. the low-lying coasts).  It's like how people say the Pennsylvania Dutch are really Germans, but the distinction didn't exist at the time they came over.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 30, 2018, 08:37:34 AM
From the Library of Congress, July 29, 1918.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza:

PRO GERMAN GRABBED WHILE MAKING TALK

  Bert Steinberger, lessee of the Casino, may have a German name, but he has nothing of the German nature as he is a 100 per cent American and wants everybody to know that before they set foot in his house. This afternoon Pete Kristich, who had been reading the bulletins and imbibing Dutch courage, floated into the Casino and engaged in a war talk during the course of which he remarked that he hoped the Kaiser would win the war and that he would win it anyhow. How much further he would have gone with his assertions and predictions remains unknown, for in about ten seconds the stalwart form of Jack Grant, chief of police, who had been summoned by phone, loomed up in front of the bar and Mr. Kristich was lugged off to the town Bastille.


TAKEN TO JAIL TO STOP HEMORRHAGE OF THE NOSE

  Alex M Gibbons, recently released from the county jail, proceeded to celebrate the event in his customary style and was seized with a nose bleed so violently that Chief of Police Jack Grant thought he would be better off back in the old quarters on the hill where he could have medical attention.


EGG FAMINE IN HAWAII

  Honolulu is threatened with an egg famine. Because of the high price of feed Japanese and Chinese poultry men are disposing of their hens. Eggs now are a luxury, selling from 80 to 90 cents a dozen with prices of cold storage eggs, imported from the mainland, almost as high.


IMITATION SHRAPNEL SHOWN ON MIZPAH

  Saturday afternoon frequenters of Mizpah hill and residents along the trail leading to the property of the Tonopah Mining company were treated to an exhibition of war that threw a scare into the district. The powder gang working on the dump which is being shipped to the mill at Millers put in two shots that evidently were too strong for a surface display with the result that rocks as large as a man's head were strewn all over the neighborhood. Some fell on the firehouse and the gymnasium and the water office was peppered as though it was an outpost of Chateau Thierry. Fortunately no damage was done.


The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier:

R.W. DE WITT ESCAPES FROM COUNTY JAIL

  The Josephine county jail was the scene last night of another successful jail break, when R. W. DeWitt, who was held to await the action of the grand jury, escaped through a hole in the brick wall. DeWitt is the man held for the robbery of the Boswell mine near Takilma early in May, when about $6000 in gold was stolen.

  Sheriff Lewis states that DeWitt had outside help, a confederate digging a hole in the brick wall on the Fifth street side of the jail, entering the corridor, picking the lock to the "tank," where DeWitt and four other men were confined, and releasing DeWitt. When the jail was opened this morning everything about the lock was found to be in order, but one prisoner was gone. The other prisoners say that they were awakened shortly before daylight by a scratching noise and the falling of brick, but they were afraid to make any outcry for fear of being shot in their cages.

  Up to the present time there is no clue as to the whereabouts of DeWitt.

I love how this reporter writes! We need more like him today.
ps: why didn't they make that German march down the main street holding an American flag and then kiss it in front of a jeering crowd like the last one?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 30, 2018, 08:45:11 AM
It is because Germans call themselves Deutsch for the same reason the Dutch do -- in English, they all used to be Dutch.  It's the same old word meaning "the people" and, linguistically at least, they are part of the same continuum from what used to be called High Dutch to Low Dutch (the "high" and "low" referring purely to topography rather than status, the mountainous interior of Europe vs. the low-lying coasts).  It's like how people say the Pennsylvania Dutch are really Germans, but the distinction didn't exist at the time they came over.

That makes better sense that what I thought. I had figured two possible reasons:
1) the English, and by extension Americans, are notoriously, and awesomely, self-centered and so would hear that 'foreign talk' and called it all Dutch. Dutch people call themselves Nederlanders.
2) Germans, especially due to odd religious sects and due to the two Wars, would say "I'm Dutch" so that people wouldn't know they were German and risk being discriminated against or held as some kind of 5th Columnists. Sort of like an American tourist in some Muslim country might claim to be Canadian etc?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: K_Dubb on July 30, 2018, 08:56:22 AM
That makes better sense that what I thought. I had figured two possible reasons:
1) the English, and by extension Americans, are notoriously, and awesomely, self-centered and so would hear that 'foreign talk' and called it all Dutch. Dutch people call themselves Nederlanders.
2) Germans, especially due to odd religious sects and due to the two Wars, would say "I'm Dutch" so that people wouldn't know they were German and risk being discriminated against or held as some kind of 5th Columnists. Sort of like an American tourist in some Muslim country might claim to be Canadian etc?

Yeah I have heard in the past ten years or so a few attempts to get people to say "Netherlandish", in English, too, probably to remove any confusion but, since the confusion only exists for people who know what Dutch/Deutsch means, it's unlikely to take hold.  They are Dutch, dammit:  Dutch doors, Dutch cottages, going Dutch, Dutch apple pie...

On the bright side, anyone of German extraction can claim Dutch courage!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: K_Dubb on July 30, 2018, 09:21:31 AM
Incidentally, the "Tysk" in Tyskland is, linguistically, the same word, the degree of corruption indicating how far back the distinction was drawn between Scandinavia and what is now Germany.  I've never really liked classifying the Scandinavian languages (and English, incidentally) as "Germanic" since the whole concept and name is much later than any of the languages and makes people think of Germany as some sort of ancestral homeland.  You can detect the fingerprints of 19th-century nationalism all over it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on July 30, 2018, 10:17:40 AM
Yeah I have heard in the past ten years or so a few attempts to get people to say "Netherlandish", in English, too, probably to remove any confusion but, since the confusion only exists for people who know what Dutch/Deutsch means, it's unlikely to take hold.  They are Dutch, dammit:  Dutch doors, Dutch cottages, going Dutch, Dutch apple pie...

On the bright side, anyone of German extraction can claim Dutch courage!

Dutch Uncle, also.

Even they are somewhat confused or, more likely, made a practical decision to accept use Dutch or even Holland. For example for official tourism site they use Holland (which is a region/2 provinces) not the whole country. For the football team they chant "Hup, Hup, Holland" and so on.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 30, 2018, 02:27:22 PM
It is because Germans call themselves Deutsch for the same reason the Dutch do -- in English, they all used to be Dutch.  It's the same old word meaning "the people" and, linguistically at least, they are part of the same continuum from what used to be called High Dutch to Low Dutch (the "high" and "low" referring purely to topography rather than status, the mountainous interior of Europe vs. the low-lying coasts).  It's like how people say the Pennsylvania Dutch are really Germans, but the distinction didn't exist at the time they came over.

I could have got off my lazy ass and looked it up but I much prefer to get the information from you, K.  My thanks to you and to mr. albretch.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: K_Dubb on July 30, 2018, 03:22:17 PM
I could have got off my lazy ass and looked it up but I much prefer to get the information from you, K.  My thanks to you and to mr. albretch.

My pleasure, Rix, you know I have opinions on that sort of thing; I'm full of 'em.  It's interesting to wonder if, without its heavy influence from the various Romance languages (especially French) from which we get the word "people", we might call ourselves "Dutch", too.  The closest native word we use is probably "folk" and, true to custom, in English it's retained for low-status stuff like folk art, music, folksy humor, etc.  Linguistically, English has a major inferiority complex going on.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on July 30, 2018, 03:35:19 PM
My mother has one of those French artillery shell vases, brought back by her father who was a doughboy. They seem to be fairly common.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 30, 2018, 06:12:16 PM
My mother has one of those French artillery shell vases, brought back by her father who was a doughboy. They seem to be fairly common.

Yes, lots of trench art out there, juan.  We had several decorated shells floating around the house when I was a kid.  One of them was big enough to hold umbrellas but it was never used for that purpose.  I remember reading somewhere that WWI German POWs made them so that they could be traded for cigarettes, soap, etc.

I noticed a lot of them are for sale on eBay.  Priced mostly between $50.00 to $500.00.  I liked this one:

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 31, 2018, 02:15:23 AM
From the Library of Congress, July 31, 1918.


The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier.

JAIL BREAKER DEWITT IS STILL IN HIDING

  R. W. DeWitt, who escaped from the jail Monday, is still at large but Sheriff Lewis is working on a clue which may give some light as to his whereabouts.

  Jailer Schroder stated positively that DeWitt was locked in the cage Sunday night, that he talked with him after he had been locked up and that he saw DeWitt playing cards with the other prisoner.

  The police authorities in all towns north and south of Grants Pass as well as the outlying country districts have been notified to be on the watch for DeWitt, and a careful description of the man has been given.

  DeWitt is about 45 years of age, is about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches tall; hair quite gray; light colored mustache. He wore a gray flannel shirt open at the throat exposing a hairy breast; felt hat pinched in to form a peak; dark corduroy pants and was in the habit of carrying his coat, a khaki Norfolk. He can be easily identified through the fact that the middle finger on his right hand is missing at the middle joint.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza.

SIXTY DAYS FDR DISLOYAL TALK

  Pete Kristich, an Austrian who indulged in seditious remarks at the Casino, was arraigned yesterday afternoon before Judge Dunseath after remaining in the county jail for forty-eight hours in an attempt to sober him up sufficiently to stand before the court of justice. The remarks were to the effect that "It is a cinch that the Kaiser will win the war." The charge was proved and the court imposed the extreme penalty for disorderly conduct and Kristich was remanded to jail. It is intimated that there are other, and more serious charges against the prisoner who will be held in safe keeping while they are under investigation.


The Seattle Star.




Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on July 31, 2018, 02:21:10 AM
American jazz pianist Hank Jones was born on July 31, 1918.

Biography of Hank Jones: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hank_Jones

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 01, 2018, 12:57:13 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 1, 1918.

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Troops of the American 326th Infantry Regiment moving towards the enemy at Choloy, 1 August 1918. Note a Bangalore torpedo they are carrying.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205093108 © IWM (Q 69955)

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Troops of the American 326th Infantry Regiment attacking German trenches at Choloy, 1 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205359135 © IWM (Q 69944)

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Troops of the American 326th Infantry Regiment attacking German trenches at Choloy, 1 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205218821 © IWM (Q 57695)



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 01, 2018, 01:37:10 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier, August 1, 1918.

NOBLE BEST SUCCUMBS T0 BAFFLING ILLNESS

  Noble best, who has been ill for some time the past week, died at 3 o'clock this afternoon at the family home on North Ninth street. The cause of death in both cases was paralysis of the cranial nerve, but the cause of the disease is still baffling the physicians.

  The death of this young man, coming only a few days after the death of his sister, Audrey, which occurred on Sunday, comes as a distinct shock and casts a gloom over the entire community.

  The funeral arrangements have not yet been made.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 01, 2018, 02:06:13 AM
Anti-Greek riots erupt in the town of Toronto, Canada on August 1, 1918.

Article: http://citiesintime.ca/toronto/story/anti-greek-r/

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Bart Ell on August 01, 2018, 07:11:39 AM
Anti-Greek riots erupt in the town of Toronto, Canada on August 1, 1918.

Article: http://citiesintime.ca/toronto/story/anti-greek-r/



And 100 years later there is still trouble on The Danforth, Mr. Rikki.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 01, 2018, 10:11:47 AM
And 100 years later there is still trouble on The Danforth, Mr. Rikki.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/one-killed-least-nine-injured-shooting-toronto-n893561

https://torontosun.com/news/national/friend-of-alleged-greektown-assassin-accused-of-possessing-historic-drug-firearm-arsenal

Again they are calling for gun control. I will note that the shooter and his friends are not of Greek extraction.....

"Court transcripts state 33-year-old Maisum Ansari — who grew up in the same neighbourhood as Fahad Hussain, the brother of Greektown gunman Faisal Hussain — was charged last September with possessing 53 kilograms of carfentanil, an analog of fentanyl and 100 times stronger than the painkiller and notoriously deadly street narcotic."

But release these kinds of people on bail:

"long-time friend of Danforth Ave. shooter Faisal Hussain was released on bail after being accused in the largest seizure of carfentanil in Canadian history — along with 33 firearms and ammunition "
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 01, 2018, 06:10:44 PM
And 100 years later there is still trouble on The Danforth, Mr. Rikki.

Great Cesare's Ghost.  Still trouble after all those years.  I thank you and mr. a for pointing that out.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 02, 2018, 12:36:12 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 2, 1918. 


RIP

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Private Albert Jones 254669. Unit: 2nd/4th Regiment, London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers).  Son of Mr. H. Jones and Mrs. M. C. Jones, of 33, Cobden Rd., Leytonstone, Essex. Private Jones died, aged 19, on 2 August 1918 at No. 4 Casualty Clearing Station, Pernois, from wounds received whilst in action. He is buried at Pernois British Cemetery, Halloy-les-Pernois, France.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205026098 © IWM (HU 96651)

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Mrs Violet Long, Deputy Controller in Chief, Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Drowned when the Hospital Ship Warlida was torpedoed in the English Channel 02 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380736 © E. O. Hoppé Estate Collection (IWM WWC A5)


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 02, 2018, 01:07:17 AM
Michael James Delligatti, the creator of McDonald's "Big Mac" hamburger, was born on August 2, 1918.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Delligatti
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 03, 2018, 01:36:06 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 3, 1918.

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French and American troops on the emplacement for a heavy German gun captured whilst in course of construction near Sarcy, 3 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086594 © IWM (Q 108340)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 03, 2018, 02:17:30 AM
Jazz vocalist Eddie Jefferson was born on August 3, 1918.

Biography of Eddie Jefferson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Jefferson

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 03, 2018, 02:19:47 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, August 3, 1918.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 04, 2018, 01:17:45 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 4, 1918.

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American troops examining a base of a heavy German gun at Breey, 4 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205139253 © IWM (Q 110497)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 04, 2018, 01:41:44 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee, August 4, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 05, 2018, 01:48:53 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 5, 1918.

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Battle of Amiens. An 8 inch howitzer of the 57th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, and its crew. Near Warloy, 5 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238808 © IWM (Q 6937)

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King George V on the bridge of the destroyer (H41) in which he reached Calais, 5 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245553 © IWM (Q 9828)

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King George V landing at Calais, 5 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245549 © IWM (Q 9824)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 05, 2018, 02:40:28 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 06, 2018, 01:00:49 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 6, 1918.

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Receiving photographic plates from the observer Lieutenant J. H. Snyder, after a reconnaissance flight, and rushing them to the field studio by a motorcycle. Pilot: Major J. N. Reynolds. Aircraft: Salmson 2 A2 biplane. Unit: 91st Aero Squadron. Gondreville-sur-Moselle aerodrome, 6 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315062 © IWM (Q 67849)

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A soldier of the 18th Battalion, London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) on daylight patrol in Albert firing a telescopic rifle to silence a sniper, 6 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205225512 © IWM (Q 6902)

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Daylight patrol of the 18th Battalion, London Regiment (London Irish Rifles) entering Albert, 6 August 1918. Albert was retaken by the 18th Division on 22 August.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239734 © IWM (Q 7946)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 06, 2018, 01:54:19 AM
On August 6, 1918 a big dumping scow carrying rock got stuck just above Niagara Falls.  It is still there to this day.

Info: https://www.niagaraparks.com/events/event/centenary-of-the-iron-scow-rescue/

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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Old_scow_wrecked_in_1918_just_above_Niagara_Falls.jpg  Diego Torres Silvestre from Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 07, 2018, 01:09:54 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 7, 1918.

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King George V riding through Hesdin Forest on a light railway while visiting a company of the Forestry Corps working there, 7 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245000 © IWM (Q 9219)

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King George V and his staff watching a man of the 365th Company, Forestry Corps, Royal Engineers felling a tree. Bouin, 7 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245554 © IWM (Q 9829)

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King George V talking to a man of a company of the Forestry Corps working in Hesdin Forest who was felling a tree, 7 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244999 © IWM (Q 9218)

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Australian soldiers. August 7, 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215599 © IWM (E(AUS) 3883)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 07, 2018, 01:38:27 AM
The French SPAD S.XX was flown for the first time on August 7, 1918.  They were developed too late for use in WWI but they were used extensively by the French in the years after the war.  It was a fast plane.  A number of speed records were set by it.

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Avion Spad-Herbermon en 1920.
By Agence Rol. Agence photographique - https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b6916310d.r=Pho20Rol?rk=1287560;0, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=70650487
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 07, 2018, 01:42:32 AM
From the Library of Congress. The Devils Lake World and Inter-Ocean, August 7, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 08, 2018, 01:11:52 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 8, 1918.

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A British Mark V tank (B56, 9003) of the 2 Battalion, Tank Corps crossing the ditch at the side of a road at Lamotte-en-Santerre, 8 August 1918. #1
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028700 © IWM (Q 68975)

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2#
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165346 © IWM (Q 106497)

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Men of the 95th Siege Battery RGA loading a 9.2 inch howitzer near Bayencourt during the Battle of Amiens, 8 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205091093 © IWM (Q 10377)

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Battle of Amiens. Three German stretcher bearers and a German casualty outside the cellar in which they were found by Lieutenant John Warwick Brooke (British official photographer), and then captured by the 10th Battalion, London Regiment. Sailly Laurette, 8 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238781 © IWM (Q 6908)

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Battle of Amiens. German prisoners marching through the ruins of Maricourt l'Abbe, 8 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244977 © IWM (Q 9195)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 08, 2018, 02:10:19 AM
From the Library of Congress, August 8, 1918.


The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings.

65th May Now Be On Firing Line

  The Medford Mall Tribune of Wednesday says that relatives of Jackson county boys in the 65th artillery are watching the war news from the front with much eagerness these days as there is a strong probability that the 65th is engaged in the great battles. A number of letters received in the city in the past two or three weeks told that the 65th was all ready for duty in the front line and about to be sent there. Today another mail from France arrived in the city bringing more letters indicating that the boys have been and probably are still in the fighting.

  Mayor and Mrs. Gates received a letter from Sergeant George Gates, written June 28, this morning, in which he made the simple statement, "We've been at the front for awhile." The letter was unusually mutilated by the censor, who cut away three and one-half pages of it. George wrote that two of his Medford comrades while out on the march, collapsed from heat attacks.

  Sergeant Ben Plymale wrote on June 20 to Samuel T. Richardson in a letter the latter received over two weeks ago that the 65th was all ready to go to the trenches, having been issued their steel helmets, gas masks and other equipment. He stated that he and four other sergeants had just returned from attending a special school in higher mathematics. Hence it is probable that the Jackson county boys of the 65th have been manipulating guns against the Hun in the recent battles. Sergeant Plymale and Sergeant Carl Ringer of Eagle Point, are the only Jackson county boys in company C of the 65th.


Aged German Enemy Meets Just Reward

  Monday evening Lester Ball, deputy United States marshal of San Francisco, passed through Ashland on train No. 16 on his way north. The officer had in his company Coach Ammar, a German, 65 years of age, who was being conducted to McNeil Island, Wash., where he will undergo internment for five years for seditious talk. It is claimed the alien enemy came from the north a short time ago and made himself conspicuous on the train by his seditious utterances.


Report Presented By Police Judge

The following is the report of the Ashland city court for the month ending July 31, 1918:

Number complaints for violation of traffic ordinance, 5.
Number of' complaints for violation of water ordinance, 16.
Number of complaints for violation of park ordinance, 2.
Number of complaints for violation of booze ordinance 5.
Number of complaints for disturbing the peace, 1.
Number of complaints charging use of obscene and vulgar language, 1.
Total number of complaints heard and disposed of, 38.
Amount of money received and deposited in city treasury, $147.00
D. M. BUOWER,
Judge of City Court.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza.

Political Advert.

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The Seattle Star.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 08, 2018, 02:32:12 AM


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 09, 2018, 02:01:48 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 9, 1918.

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Corporal of the Tank Corps standing beside the camouflaged Mark V tank 'J18' of the 10th Battalion in a cornfield near Albert, 9 August 1918. The battalion was attached to the III Corps during the Battle of Amiens.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205125425 © IWM (Q 9248)

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Mark V tanks of the 10th Battalion, Tank Corps (tanks numbers are J17, J18, J19, and J29) attached to the III Corps during the Battle of Amiens, standing in a cornfield near Albert, 9 August 1918. They are hidden from aerial observation by being covered with corn.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245025 © IWM (Q 9246)

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Battle of Amiens. Captured German Maxim machine gun and a British soldier resting at the post. Note steps leading to dug-out. Malard Wood, 9 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238799 © IWM (Q 6927)

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Battle of Amiens. German prisoners arriving at a temporary POW camp near Amiens, 9 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087475© IWM (Q 9193)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 10, 2018, 01:30:52 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 10th, 1918.


RIP

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Nurse Marion Dorothy Chapman, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of pneumonia at Alexandria 10 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380077 © IWM (WWC H2-110)

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Second Lieutenant Edmund John Waldegrave. Unit: D Battery, 286th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Death: 10 August 1918. Killed outright by a bomb. Western Front. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has age at death given as 19.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205390222 © IWM (HU 126934)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 10, 2018, 02:06:42 AM
The Axeman of New Orleans continued his killing spree on August 10, 1918.  Joseph Romano an elderly man who was struck in the head by the Axeman's axe, survived the initial attack but died two days later due to complications.  He was the Axeman's sixth victim. 

Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axeman_of_New_Orleans

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Illustrated map on rash of axe murders in New Orleans, 1919.
By Not credited - via Times-Picayune website; which New Orleans newspaper this was originally published in unfortunately not specified., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17107923

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 10, 2018, 04:27:20 PM
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Josef Eibl

Economist's son from Edhof.  https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c1/Zell-bayerischer-wald.jpg

Infantryman with the 7th Bavarian Infantry Regiment, Company 8.

Died at a camp near Lihons, France, from wounds suffered during the fighting at Amiens on August 10, 1918.

He was 20 years old.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 11, 2018, 01:58:36 AM
From the Library of Congress, August 11, 1918.


The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier.

MINISTRY BESIEGED BY FREAK INVENTIONS

London, July 15. (Correspondence of the Associated Press)

If the dreams of numerous British amateur inventors who have been besieging the ministry of munitions could be realized, the war would have been over long since and little would be left of the German army. Recent proposals include the following:

Freeze the clouds and mount artillery thereon.

Train cormorants to fly to Essen to pick the mortar from Krupp's walls so that they will crumble.

Trail from balloons monster magnets that would snatch rifles from the hands of the German soldiers.

Perch men on shells to steer them.

A suggestion often submitted is to attach a searchlight to an anti-aircraft gun, project the light on a Gotha and shoot along the beam. Unfortunately, shells will not follow the path of light. 

Other schemes for dealing with hostile aircraft are to suspend heavy guns from captive balloons; to arm defense airplanes with scythes; to provide heat rays for setting Zeppelins on fire, and to cover the moon with a big black balloon. To prevent polished rails shinning at night and serving as a guide to enemy aircraft, the last coach of the last train is to drop blacking on them.

A shell containing gravel is to lay a pathway over mud, and another, containing an irritant powder or a sticky substance, is to hamper machine guns.

The "relay shell' is a favorite proposal, the plan being for a shell at the height of its flight to expel a smaller inner shell. As a shell does not point directly along its trajectory it would be impossible to secure accuracy of aim for the second shell.

Among the more miscellaneous projects are:

To petrify German soldiers by squirting cement over them.

To throw snakes by pneumatic propulsion into the enemy trenches.

To penetrate and attack Germany itself via a "tube" built "all the way" from England.

It is said that about one suggestion in ten that reach the ministry of munitions is novel and possible.

The air ministry announces that its air inventions committee, formed about nine months ago, has examined more than 5,000 inventions and suggestions.


The Tombstone (Arizona) Epitaph.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WOTR on August 11, 2018, 02:20:38 AM
...and to cover the moon with a big black balloon.
Not a bad idea.  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 11, 2018, 02:44:31 AM
Not a bad idea.  :)

Ha, yeah.  I liked the one where they spray cement on the German soldiers, thus hardening them up.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on August 11, 2018, 04:56:21 AM
I liked the snakes. Put a bunch of rattlers in a barrel and launch it with a catapult.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 11, 2018, 09:48:44 PM
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Johannes Rehm

Grenadier (thrower of hand grenades) with the Grenade Regiment 123, Company 4.

Born on September 20, 1899 in Westerheim, Bavaria-Germany.

Died in a military hospital in Saint-Amand, France on August 11, 1918.

Buried in the churchyard in Saint-Armand.

He was 18 years old.


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Josef Schreibauer

Son of a farmer from Usigen, Germany.

A machine gunner with the Leib Regiment, Company 4.

Holder of the Iron Cross and Military Honor Medal.

Died as a result of a shot to the chest on August 11, 1918 after 21 months of loyal, soldierly service.

He was 21 years old.



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 12, 2018, 01:02:03 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 11, and 12, 1918.

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American soldiers on board the Chinese troopship ELPENOR near Princes' Landing Stage, prior to debarking. Liverpool, 11 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205305120 © IWM (Q 55447)

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British soldiers extinguishing a fire caused by hostile air raid on Calais, 12 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246834 © IWM (Q 11222)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 13, 2018, 01:26:58 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 13, 1918.
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Troops of the American 37th Division taking enemy trenches near St. Barbe, signal flares can be seen in the distance, 13 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205359146 © IWM (Q 69957)

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King George V going aboard H.M.S. Whirlwind after his visit to France. Photograph taken at Dunkirk, 13 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245558 © IWM (Q 9833)

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Sailors cheering King George V leaving Dunkirk in the Royal Navy flotilla leader HMS Whirlwind, 13th August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205254231 © IWM (Q 19915)

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King George V leaving Dunkirk in the Royal Navy flotilla leader HMS Whirlwind, 13 August 1918. Commander Reginald St. Pierre Parry and Vice Admiral Roger Keyes are also in attendance.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205254229 © IWM (Q 19913)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 13, 2018, 02:07:07 AM
From the Library of Congress, August 13, 1918. 

The Tonopah Daily Bonanza.

SUBMARINE CREW TRAMPLES ON FLAG

NANTUCKET, Mass., Aug. 13.
  The American flag was torn from the masthead of the schooner Lena May, sunk by a U-boat, and taken aboard the submarine by a German officer who wrapped it around his neck and gave a grotesque exhibition of dancing, while his men, each armed with revolvers, looked on and cheered, according to survivors. The mate of the Lena May declared the Germans were drunk.

  "At least they were half shot," he said. "You would have thought that, too, had you seen the German officer and heard the cheering as he finally flung down the American flag and stamped on it. You would have thought again they were drunk when, finding a side of fresh beef in our galley, they set up a roar. The way they cheered made me think they were half starved."


The Seattle Star.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 14, 2018, 12:42:59 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 14, 1918.

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Royal Engineers constructing a new line at the ruined railway station at Villers-Bretonneux, 14 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205306348 © IWM (Q 56897)

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Damaged houses in the neighborhood of Caix, 14 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308668 © IWM (Q 61209)

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Canadian troops examining a captured German 21 cm Mörser 16 heavy howitzer near Demuin, 14 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323450 © IWM (Q 78690)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 14, 2018, 01:06:59 AM
French flying ace René Fonck shot down three German aircraft in ten seconds in a head-on attack, with all three crashing within 100 meters (328 feet) of one another near Roye, Somme, France, on August 14, 1918.

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Fonck beside his Spad XIII.
By Djul - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4731634

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 15, 2018, 03:01:08 AM
From the Library of Congress, August 15, 1918.

That Ashland (Oregon) Tidings.

Central Point Sees Queer Sky Vision

  According to reports residents of Central Point "saw things" in the sky last Monday night, which has caused much comment in that vicinity. At about 9:00 that evening a streak of fire, at first thought a meteor, was seen in the air about three miles west of Central Point. The streak seemed to split in two, according to some witnesses, one part ascending upwards out of sight, and the other part drifting down to earth until it reached a yard on the outskirts of Central Point.

  A number of witnesses positively state that they saw the queer sky vision. The general impression seems to be that some one sent up a kite and before starting it heaven ward had set fire to it. Then on reaching a great height the burning kite kept on going and the strand of rope burned off from the kite as it descended. But the occurrence caused many wild stories to be started, including the resurrection of that peaceable old airplane that was supposed to lurk in the country back of Roxy Ann last spring.

  One woman, it is claimed, while watching the burning light in the sky through strong field glasses, declares she not only distinctly saw the wings of an airplane, but saw a bomb dropped from it.


Stable and Contents Burned In Cemetery

  An alarm of fire called the department and engine out to Mountain View cemetery Tuesday afternoon about three o'clock, where it was found that a grass fire had spread to a stable in the cemetery.

  A nearby fence was also ablaze when the fire fighters arrived, and another stable was in danger. With the aid of the chemical engine and water from the hydrants in the cemetery, the flames were subdued, but the stable and its contents were destroyed.

  It is supposed that the blaze originated at a Chinese grave where a feast for the spirit of the departed was being served hot, and which ignited the dry grass in the cemetery.

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Mountain View Cemetery, Junction of Normal Ave. and OR 66 Ashland.
By OrcaFin - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35891928


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza.

STRUCK BY LIGHTNING AND LIVES TO TELL

  Fred Dinsmore, who was struck by lightning a week ago, is in town and tells of his experience, says the Elko Free Press. At the beginning of the storm he and his companions who were working for Charles Drowns at Lee, left their work in the field and started for the house, and when but a short distance away the storm broke and a bolt of lightning struck near them, rendering Dinsmore unconscious, but his companions were unharmed. He was taken to the house and artificial respiration was used, as he had all the appearance of a dead man. A physician was sent for, but he had recovered before the doctor arrived. The lightning seemed to have affected his right side only, bruising his body and face, and today there still remains large black spots on his body and the right side of his face is discolored, but he says that he feels but little the worse for his experience.


The Seattle Star.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 16, 2018, 01:05:41 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 16, 1918.

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Bathing parade for patients at No.14 Convalescent Depot, on the beach at Trouville, 16 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246851 © IWM (Q 11240)

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Patients from No. 14 Convalescent Depot at Trouville bathing in the sea, 16 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246809 © IWM (Q 11193)

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An open air performance in front of a large audience of troops by the "Bohemians" concert party of No. 14 Convalescent Depot at Trouville. The stage has been erected in the shell of a ruined building. 16 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194034 © IWM (Q 11503)

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Soldiers watching a concert party at No. 14 Convalescent Depot at Trouville, 16 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246811 © IWM (Q 11195)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 17, 2018, 01:08:35 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 17, 1918.
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The Advance through Palestine and the Battle of Megiddo: A high view of the camp and horse lines of A Squadron, 9th Australian Light Horse Regiment, in a valley near Jericho in Palestine.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195227 © IWM (Q 115170)

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A boxing match at No. 16 Convalescent Depot, Trouville, 17 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195325 © IWM (Q 11197)

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Soldiers in their huts at No. 14 Convalescent Depot at Trouville, 16 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246808 © IWM (Q 11192)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 17, 2018, 01:22:08 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 18, 2018, 12:14:20 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 18, 1918.

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Action of Outtersteene Ridge. The British creeping barrage (9th Division) at Meteren, 18 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238852 © IWM (Q 6990)

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Action of Outtersteene Ridge. Artillery observers watching the progress of the creeping barrage laid down to support the attack of 27th Brigade, 9th Division. Meteren, 18 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216467 © IWM (Q 6948)

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Action of Outtersteene Ridge. Wounded of the 9th Division going back by light railway. Meteren, 18 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238826 © IWM (Q 6960)

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British SS (Submarine Scout) Zero Class airship passing over the promenade at Paris Plage, 18th May 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247693 © IWM (Q 12162)

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Dazzle-camouflaged American battleship USS Andra, 18 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307488 © IWM (Q 58243)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on August 18, 2018, 12:20:51 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 18, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238852 © IWM (Q 6990)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216467 © IWM (Q 6948)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238826 © IWM (Q 6960)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247693 © IWM (Q 12162)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307488 © IWM (Q 58243)

Even with the dazzle I don’t think that is a battleship.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 18, 2018, 12:24:55 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Star, August 18, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 18, 2018, 12:31:36 AM
Even with the dazzle I don’t think that is a battleship.

Good eye.  I'd say it's a transport ship, perhaps not carrying troops but machinery or plane parts?  I've always wondered, dazzle or not, it's still a target for a sub.  Did it really throw their aim off?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on August 18, 2018, 12:39:36 AM
Good eye.  I'd say it's a transport ship, perhaps not carrying troops but machinery or plane parts?  I've always wondered, dazzle or not, it's still a target for a sub.  Did it really throw their aim off?

In WW I it seems like they threw off the optical rangefinders just enough to keep the torpedoes from hitting midships. Less dazzle ships were sunk even though they were hit.

I assume homing torpedoes in WW II erased the optical advantages.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 18, 2018, 12:45:21 AM
In WW I it seems like they threw off the optical rangefinders just enough to keep the torpedoes from hitting midships. Less dazzle ships were sunk even though they were hit.

I assume homing torpedoes in WW II erased the optical advantages.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage

Interesting statistics.  Thanks for the link, Gravity.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 18, 2018, 10:05:35 AM
In WW I it seems like they threw off the optical rangefinders just enough to keep the torpedoes from hitting midships. Less dazzle ships were sunk even though they were hit.

I assume homing torpedoes in WW II erased the optical advantages.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage

Would it be legal to "wrap" a vehicle in that kind of "dazzle" camouflage? Would it help avoid tickets... or get more? Cause accidents? Many threads back the "dazzle" ship camo was discussed I wonder if ever used on tanks, APC, etc for land operations using the same theory of throwing off the aim? The crazy camo I ever seen, more like some odd-ball "modern art" piece one might see in some museum than something used in the military!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 19, 2018, 02:09:25 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, August 19, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 20, 2018, 12:31:06 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 20, 1918.

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French Renault FT-17 tanks passing through the village of Nampcel, 20 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205306008 © IWM (Q 56431)

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Clothing removed from American troops affected by mustard gas. Frapelle, 20 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215783 © IWM (Q 70735)

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Night work at the Machine Gun School at Rombly, 20 August 1918. Gunners firing during the explosion of a mine.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238838 © IWM (Q 6972)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 20, 2018, 01:00:44 AM
Author Jacqueline Susann was born 100 years ago today.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacqueline_Susann

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Susann in 1951.
By Photo by Bruno of Hollywood - eBayfrontback, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31528160
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: 2Lord2Grantham on August 20, 2018, 01:48:08 PM
Would it be legal to "wrap" a vehicle in that kind of "dazzle" camouflage? Would it help avoid tickets... or get more? Cause accidents? Many threads back the "dazzle" ship camo was discussed I wonder if ever used on tanks, APC, etc for land operations using the same theory of throwing off the aim? The crazy camo I ever seen, more like some odd-ball "modern art" piece one might see in some museum than something used in the military!

Not at all illegal. Here in Michigan it's not unusual to see prototype cars hidden behind "dazzle" patterns.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 20, 2018, 03:57:47 PM
Not at all illegal. Here in Michigan it's not unusual to see prototype cars hidden behind "dazzle" patterns.

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Ha, I didn't think of that.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 21, 2018, 01:20:32 AM
A big tornado roared through Tyler, Minnesota on August 21, 1918, leaving 36 people dead.  It was the fourth deadliest tornado in Minnesota history.

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A postcard showing some of the damage from the Tyler, Minnesota tornado of 1918. 


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 22, 2018, 12:56:59 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, August 22, 1918.


STRICKEN WITH PARALYSIS ON BLACK ROCK DESERT

  The Review-Miner says Frank Hoskins, who was born in Lovelock and lived there most of his life, was found on the Black Rock desert suffering from a stroke of paralysis. It is said that he was out on a prospecting trip when the stroke caught him, and he lay there for two days and a night before he was found. His rescuers took him to the Western Pacific railroad and he was taken to a hospital in Sacramento.


MONEY IN BUTTER

  The farmers in the Mason valley region received $104,000 for their butter fat in the year 1917, according to the report of the local dairy in Yerington.


SERVICE FUNERAL FRIDAY AFTERNOON

  The funeral of the late Andrew Service, who died yesterday afternoon, will take place tomorrow afternoon at 4:30 o'clock from the Elks' home and the remains will be interred in the Elks' plot in the local cemetery. The cause of death was miners consumption contracted in the old Delamar mine and mill where the glassy dust was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of other strong men, but a rugged constitution enabled the old man to fight off the end for many years, He was born in Ireland, near Belfast, 68 years ago, and came to this country in one of the old Black Ball clippers with father and mother. His father died on the voyage and his mother lived but a short time after landing. Andy and his brother were taken to a kinsman at Sugar Creek, N. Y., and later lived at Franklin, Pa, where the deceased met W. S. Brylen who accompanied him to Nevada in 1877 and remained his staunch friend to death. The first stopping place was at Tempuate, Lincoln county, and some time later Mr. Service took charge of the Nevada Alpine mine. He also was engaged in the mercantile business, owning the Frisco store, which he bought from C. J. Blumenthal. He was not a member of the Masonic bodies, reports to the contrary notwithstanding, as the Elks was the only organization with which he was affiliated.


SEVERELY BURNED WHILE CLEANING CAR WITH GASOLINE

  While cleaning the engine of his automobile at the camp of National a few days ago Erling Prout, a mining man, was quite severely burned when the gasoline he was using caught fire. He had a piece of broken spring in his hand and in working around the machine the piece of metal came in contact with the self starter battery, sending a spark into the pan of gasoline which he had in his hand. He was burned about the face and body. His trousers were almost burned away and the fact that he had on woolen underwear saved him from serious burns. Humboldt Star


HAS KNEE CAP BROKEN

  While hauling some old iron from the dumping ground near the new high school Saturday afternoon, the team Richard See was driving started to run away and he had the misfortune to have one of his kneecaps broken. The accident happened about 3 o'clock and in trying to control the team a long piece of iron which had caught in one of the wheels struck him on the knee with the above result. Humboldt Star.


PIONEER HOMESEAD DESTROYED BY FIRE

  Last evening, about 7 o'clock, the Major Gardner home was discovered on fire. There is no fire protection provisions within a considerable distance and the place was burned to the ground. The loss of the old Gardner home removes one of the real old fashioned homesteads of this section. The home was constructed during the early days by Major Gardner, who at that time was one of the successful contractors and timber men of this section, supplying Virginia City with his lumber and wood. No expense was spared and the home was the gathering place of the young people of the generation that has grown and gone. Carson News.


MURDERED FOR MONEY

  Riccl Raffaele, 60 years of age, an Italian section hand of Ocala, well known in Lovelock, was found dead at daybreak Friday morning in the middle of B street, with three knife wounds in the body and the purse missing. Robbery is believed to be the motive for the deed. Lovelock Review-Miner.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 22, 2018, 01:01:51 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 22, 2018, 01:32:54 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, August 22, 1918.


STRICKEN WITH PARALYSIS ON BLACK ROCK DESERT

  The Review-Miner says Frank Hoskins, who was born in Lovelock and lived there most of his life, was found on the Black Rock desert suffering from a stroke of paralysis. It is said that he was out on a prospecting trip when the stroke caught him, and he lay there for two days and a night before he was found. His rescuers took him to the Western Pacific railroad and he was taken to a hospital in Sacramento.


MONEY IN BUTTER

  The farmers in the Mason valley region received $104,000 for their butter fat in the year 1917, according to the report of the local dairy in Yerington.


SERVICE FUNERAL FRIDAY AFTERNOON

  The funeral of the late Andrew Service, who died yesterday afternoon, will take place tomorrow afternoon at 4:30 o'clock from the Elks' home and the remains will be interred in the Elks' plot in the local cemetery. The cause of death was miners consumption contracted in the old Delamar mine and mill where the glassy dust was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of other strong men, but a rugged constitution enabled the old man to fight off the end for many years, He was born in Ireland, near Belfast, 68 years ago, and came to this country in one of the old Black Ball clippers with father and mother. His father died on the voyage and his mother lived but a short time after landing. Andy and his brother were taken to a kinsman at Sugar Creek, N. Y., and later lived at Franklin, Pa, where the deceased met W. S. Brylen who accompanied him to Nevada in 1877 and remained his staunch friend to death. The first stopping place was at Tempuate, Lincoln county, and some time later Mr. Service took charge of the Nevada Alpine mine. He also was engaged in the mercantile business, owning the Frisco store, which he bought from C. J. Blumenthal. He was not a member of the Masonic bodies, reports to the contrary notwithstanding, as the Elks was the only organization with which he was affiliated.


SEVERELY BURNED WHILE CLEANING CAR WITH GASOLINE

  While cleaning the engine of his automobile at the camp of National a few days ago Erling Prout, a mining man, was quite severely burned when the gasoline he was using caught fire. He had a piece of broken spring in his hand and in working around the machine the piece of metal came in contact with the self starter battery, sending a spark into the pan of gasoline which he had in his hand. He was burned about the face and body. His trousers were almost burned away and the fact that he had on woolen underwear saved him from serious burns. Humboldt Star


HAS KNEE CAP BROKEN

  While hauling some old iron from the dumping ground near the new high school Saturday afternoon, the team Richard See was driving started to run away and he had the misfortune to have one of his kneecaps broken. The accident happened about 3 o'clock and in trying to control the team a long piece of iron which had caught in one of the wheels struck him on the knee with the above result. Humboldt Star.


PIONEER HOMESEAD DESTROYED BY FIRE

  Last evening, about 7 o'clock, the Major Gardner home was discovered on fire. There is no fire protection provisions within a considerable distance and the place was burned to the ground. The loss of the old Gardner home removes one of the real old fashioned homesteads of this section. The home was constructed during the early days by Major Gardner, who at that time was one of the successful contractors and timber men of this section, supplying Virginia City with his lumber and wood. No expense was spared and the home was the gathering place of the young people of the generation that has grown and gone. Carson News.


MURDERED FOR MONEY

  Riccl Raffaele, 60 years of age, an Italian section hand of Ocala, well known in Lovelock, was found dead at daybreak Friday morning in the middle of B street, with three knife wounds in the body and the purse missing. Robbery is believed to be the motive for the deed. Lovelock Review-Miner.

I like the clarifications regarding his possible Masonic connections and good to learn that wool underwear will help in fires.

RIP Ricce, I suspect the "Black Hand" or Italian Anarchists involved.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 23, 2018, 12:31:02 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 23, 1918.

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British official cinematographer and his assistants going towards Meaulte. Note shell-burst on the right. 23 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205019071 © IWM (Q 7019)

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Battle of Albert. British official photographer at work in Meaulte the day after its capture, 23 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205073495 © IWM (Q 7020)

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Two soldiers of the 12th Division taking cover behind a wall from splinters of a bursting shell at Meaulte, 23 August 1918. (Captured by 12th Division on 22 August).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238942 © IWM (Q 7089)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 23, 2018, 12:55:55 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 24, 2018, 12:47:32 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Public Ledger, Philadelphia, Pa., August 24, 1918.
 
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: 2Lord2Grantham on August 24, 2018, 05:49:57 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Public Ledger, Philadelphia, Pa., August 24, 1918.
 
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Calling the Germans "Dutch" takes a second to process.

But, come on dude, you've done your bit, go home.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 25, 2018, 12:21:42 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 25, 1918.

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The Pilot and Forward Observer in a Handley Page 0/400 Bomber of No. 207 Squadron at Ligescourt Aerodrome, 25 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247637 © IWM (Q 12102)

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Second Battle of the Somme. Armoured cars setting out on a reconnaissance near Biefvillers, 25 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238894 © IWM (Q 7036)

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Battle traffic seen at Grevillers on 25 August 1918, following the village's capture by the British 37th Division and the New Zealand Division at the start of the Hundred Days Offensive, a few days earlier. Mark V tanks of the 10th Battalion the Tank Corps and British and New Zealand infantry going forward. Also seen are captured German 4.2 inch guns etc.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196058 © IWM (Q 11262)

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A soldier of the New Zealand Division takes cover behind a small farm building as a German shell-bursts nearby, Grevillers, 25 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246864 © IWM (Q 11255)

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Troopship SS Takada arriving at Albert Docks in London with troops of the American 77th Artillery Regiment, 25 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205187959 © IWM (Q 71929)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 25, 2018, 12:52:24 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 26, 2018, 01:13:37 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 26, 1918.

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A general service officer (General Service Corps) with cages of canaries from evacuated villages, seen at Neulette, 26 August 1918. #1
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246859 © IWM (Q 11249)

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#2
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205212914 © IWM (Q 11250)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 26, 2018, 01:38:11 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Chickasha Daily Express, (Oklahoma) August 26, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 26, 2018, 01:46:43 AM
Religious author and Grand Champion Jeopardy winner Hutton Gibson was born on August 26, 1918.  (He was also Mel's dad.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hutton_Gibson
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 27, 2018, 12:14:37 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 27, 1918.

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British soldiers, probably from the Army Service Corps, survey the ruins of Bethune, 27 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246866 © IWM (Q 11257)

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A British soldier poses with a heavy shell with a chalked message 'A Present for Jerry' at a shell dump, 27 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246870 © IWM (Q 11261)

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A crowd of German prisoners taken by the British Fourth Army in the Battle of Amiens. Near Abbeville, 27 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194920 © IWM (Q 9271)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 27, 2018, 12:46:12 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 27, 2018, 10:44:04 PM
Religious author and Grand Champion Jeopardy winner Hutton Gibson was born on August 26, 1918.  (He was also Mel's dad.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hutton_Gibson

"The category is 'Who Did It?'"
"Make it a true daily double, Alex"
"Who are the Jooose?!"
"I'm sorry we were looking for the Fake Pope but would accept Vatican II."
"They are all in league, dammit! Merv also and all of Hollywood...!!!!"
"Our judges have confirmed, during thr commercial and you are awarded a correct answer."


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 28, 2018, 01:20:41 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, August 28, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WOTR on August 28, 2018, 03:05:04 AM

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196058 © IWM (Q 11262)

I seriously love those old tanks.  The treads running around the entire outside of the machine making it look as though it could flip on its head and still keep running.  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 28, 2018, 01:24:47 PM
I seriously love those old tanks.  The treads running around the entire outside of the machine making it look as though it could flip on its head and still keep running.  :)

I love the Mark V British tank too.  When it was all said and done, the Mark V was the best designed tank of WWI.  The French tanks were too small and the German's tanks were too slow and bulky.  There are about a dozen or so surviving Mark V's spread out around the world, even one in Georgia, USA.  The one shown below is in a British museum. 

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Mark V Tank
By Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK - Mark V TankUploaded by Magnus Manske, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=21108206
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 29, 2018, 01:16:15 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 29, 1918.

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Second Battle of the Somme. Battery of 8-inch howitzers (Royal Garrison Artillery) in action on the roadside at St. Leger. Note dust rising from road as result of concussion of discharge, 29 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247096 © IWM (Q 11502)

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French Renault FT-17 tanks moving to the support of French troops at Valpries Farm near Juvigny, 29 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087775 © IWM (Q 69945)

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Battle of the Scarpe. Capture of the Greenland Hill by the 51st Division. Daylight patrol of the 6th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders working forward towards Hausa and Delbar Woods. North-east of Roeux, 29 August 1918. Troops leaving their trench.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238868 © IWM (Q 7007)

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Battle of the Scarpe. A tank attached to the 51st Division embedded in the Scarpe marshes. Near Fampoux, 29 August 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238895 © IWM (Q 7037)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 30, 2018, 01:10:59 AM
From the Europeana Collection.  August 30, 1918.

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Photographic finds of Lieutenant Observer of Aviation, Giuseppe Cela. Photograph of a crashed airplane, August 30, 1918.
Fotografia di aereo cappottato - http://www.europeana.eu/portal/recordhttp://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/contributions/16292/attachments/175863.html. europeana19141918:agent/22ac2152aa411d5f8650386689f8fd2d. Europeana 1914-1918. CC BY-SA - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 30, 2018, 01:33:21 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Morgan City Daily Review (Louisiana)., August 30, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 30, 2018, 01:45:30 AM
(Ha, the narrator says April 30, 1918, at the start of the video.)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 30, 2018, 01:48:10 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on August 30, 2018, 05:20:09 PM
(Ha, the narrator says April 30, 1918, at the start of the video.)

Likely an error but also recall the calendar differences/changes between Western n Eastern churches/society and how commies, and revolutionaries in general, often like to change calendars as they 'reset' society toward their utopia...
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on August 31, 2018, 12:31:50 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, August 31, 1918.

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German A7V tanks, probably in Fremicourt.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205264272 © IWM (Q 23924)

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German A7V tanks, probably in Fremicourt. The one on the right is named "Hagen", the other is very likely "Schnuck".
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205225525 © IWM (Q 37344)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Whistler on September 01, 2018, 10:29:16 AM
Hey - Is that a wind-up key on the side of that tank ?    ;D

Nope just a dude standing there and a protruding cannon barrel.    ;)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 01, 2018, 08:26:35 PM
Hey - Is that a wind-up key on the side of that tank ?    ;D

Nope just a dude standing there and a protruding cannon barrel.    ;)

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Ha!  When I blur my vision slightly, that does look like a toy wind up key.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 02, 2018, 01:26:15 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 2, 1918.

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The ruined Rue d'Armentieres at Bailleul, 2 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084358 © IWM (Q 47669)

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Ruined college in Bailleul, 2 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323462 © IWM (Q 78702)

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British troops passing through Dranouter, 2 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323470 © IWM (Q 78710)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 02, 2018, 02:06:01 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Webster City Freeman, (Iowa) September 2, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 02, 2018, 02:08:19 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 03, 2018, 12:51:42 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 3, 1918.

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A soldier, possibly from 5th Australian Division surveys a barricade erected by the Germans at the entrance to Peronne, following the capture of the town, 3 September 1918, during the Battle of Bapaume.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246877 © IWM (Q 11270)

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A soldier, probably from 5th Australian Division, darts across open ground amongst the ruins of Peronne following the capture of the town as part of the Battle of Bapaume, 3 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246878 © IWM (Q 11271)

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View of the town from a British outpost in Lens, 3 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238927 © IWM (Q 7071)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 03, 2018, 01:32:12 AM
Jimmie Riddle (of Hee Haw fame) was born on September 3, 1918.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Whistler on September 03, 2018, 01:36:13 AM
Hey RG - good to see you're keeping your thread going over here @ EG.   ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Whistler on September 03, 2018, 01:38:29 AM
Ha!  When I blur my vision slightly, that does look like a toy wind up key.
;)

It's kind of sad the younger generation has no idea what wind up toys were.
In a word - 'Fun'   :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Whistler on September 03, 2018, 01:40:56 AM
Ha!  When I blur my vision slightly, that does look like a toy wind up key.
Pareidolia  strikes again.

Edit:
Oh, you're going to love this. In order to make sure I got the spelling correct on Pareidolia, I typed it into startpage. the first entry that came up was wikipedia. The picture they used was the face on Mars. They didn't mention Hoagy directly, but...
 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 03, 2018, 02:37:31 AM
Hey RG - good to see you're keeping your thread going over here @ EG.   ;)

Thanks.  Very glad to be here.  All thanks to Bart.  He's the greatest.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 03, 2018, 02:40:46 AM
Pareidolia  strikes again.

Edit:
Oh, you're going to love this. In order to make sure I got the spelling correct on Pareidolia, I typed it into startpage. the first entry that came up was wikipedia. The picture they used was the face on Mars. They didn't mention Hoagy directly, but...
 ;D

Yes, I do love it.  Poor Richard, I don't think he has ever been a fan of that word, lol.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 04, 2018, 01:44:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 4, 1918.

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Men of the Hampshire Regiment and Army Service Corps working a propaganda balloon distributing unit. One balloon is being inflated with hydrogen and the 'release' (with leaflets attached) is being fastened to the neck of another, near Bethune, 4th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246925 © IWM (Q 11320)

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A soldier of the Army Service Corps about to liberate a propaganda balloon, the 'release' having bean attached and lighted, near Bethune, 4th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246928 © IWM (Q 11323)

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Two soldiers of the Hampshire Regiment releasing shall balloons, to which are attached bundles of propaganda leaflets. Near Bethune, 4 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247723 © IWM (Q 12193)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 04, 2018, 02:01:58 AM
Paul Harvey was born on September 4, 1918. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Harvey)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 06, 2018, 12:13:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 6, 1918.

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Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line. Royal Engineers laying the railroad at Ecoust, 6 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238917 © IWM (Q 7060)

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Captured German anti-aircraft guns and other war material near Attichy, 6 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323660 © IWM (Q 78900)

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German 21 cm (210 mm) Mörser 16 heavy howitzer captured near Saint-Leger, 6 September 1918. Note scribbling on the barrel noting the 281st Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238918 © IWM (Q 7061)

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A gun caterpillar-tractor hauling a lorry out of a shell-hole. Noreuil, 6 September 1918 (Captured by 3rd Division on 2 September).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238911 © IWM (Q 7054)

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British officers in Place de l'Hotel de Ville at Bapaume, 6 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323494 © IWM (Q 78734)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 06, 2018, 06:24:46 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Webster City Freeman, (Iowa) September 2, 1918.

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Rivals the accident in Oregon where a branch happened to luckily saved.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 06, 2018, 06:27:47 PM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 4, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246925 © IWM (Q 11320)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246928 © IWM (Q 11323)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247723 © IWM (Q 12193)

Outside a Grateful Dead concert?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 07, 2018, 12:01:10 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 7, 1918.
 
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Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line. Queant, to the NW, of which was the junction of the Hindenburg and Wotan Lines. 7 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238906 © IWM (Q 7049)

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The ruins of Croisilles, which were retaken on 28 August 1918 by the 56th Division. 7 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239120 © IWM (Q 7295) © IWM (Q 7050)

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Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line. Ruins of Queant, where the 52nd, 57th and 63rd Divisions broke through the Hindenburg Line on 2 September 1918. (7 September 1918)
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238905 © IWM (Q 7048)

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St. Leger, captured by the Guards Division on 24 August 1918. (7 September 1918).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238907  © IWM (Q 7050)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 07, 2018, 12:26:40 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 08, 2018, 12:37:24 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 8, 1918.

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Group of British troops in an old mine crater near Lens, 8 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323485 © IWM (Q 78725)

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View taken from a British advanced post in the center of ruined Lens, 8 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323482 © IWM (Q 78722)

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Australian troops in a captured German observation post and a machine gun concrete shelter at Mont-Saint-Quentin, 8 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323480 © IWM (Q 78720)

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Ruined chateau at Mont-Saint-Quentin, 8 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323477 © IWM (Q 78717)

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Allied officers examining a German signpost in the midst of the ruins of Peronne, 8 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323475 © IWM (Q 78715)

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British Cavalry and lorries of the 16th (Irish) Division passing the ruined basilica, of Notre Dame de Brebieres, Albert, 8th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246921 © IWM (Q 11316)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 08, 2018, 12:55:55 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Washington Herald, September 8, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 09, 2018, 01:18:07 AM
From the  Library of Congress, September 9, 1918.


The Watertown News (Wisconsin)

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The Seattle Star

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 09, 2018, 01:38:32 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 10, 2018, 12:05:20 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 10, 1918.

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Ambulances and drivers of the Scottish Red Cross Mobile Unit at Rouen, 10 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205079861 © IWM (Q 9298)

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A Queen Mary's Auxiliary Army Corps (QMAAC) cook preparing dinner for the troops, Rouen, 10th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193173  © IWM (Q 9302)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 10, 2018, 12:41:54 AM
From the Library of Congress, September 10, 1918.


The Sun (New York)

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The Seattle Star

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 11, 2018, 12:10:56 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 11, 1918.

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German battleship steaming into the Firth of Forth to surrender to Admiral Beatty.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205318359 © IWM (Q 73563)

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A German Battleship steaming into the Firth of Forth. September 11th, 1918 when the German Fleet surrendered to Admiral Beatty.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205318530 © IWM (Q 73737)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WOTR on September 11, 2018, 12:24:08 AM
From the Library of Congress, September 10, 1918.


The Sun (New York)

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The Seattle Star

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The more things change, the more they stay the same.  I love when people present the idea that 100 years ago people were more civil and that it was a more gentle time.  Perhaps it was... So long as you don't drink a beer that does not belong to you, or refuse service to a potential customer.  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 11, 2018, 01:05:48 AM
The more things change, the more they stay the same.  I love when people present the idea that 100 years ago people were more civil and that it was a more gentle time.  Perhaps it was... So long as you don't drink a beer that does not belong to you, or refuse service to a potential customer.  :)

The poor guy in the first clipping surely had one too many to let the bartender say "Here, let me show you this.  First I'll pour some of this liquor on your clothes and then I'll take this match and..."
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 11, 2018, 01:17:48 AM
From the Library of Congress, September 11, 1918.


The Rogue River Courier

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The Tonopah Daily Bonanza

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The Cordova (Alaska) Daily Times  (Advertisements)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 11, 2018, 01:33:09 AM
Of course nobody knew it at the time, but World War One would end in exactly two more months.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 12, 2018, 01:19:36 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Punta Gorda (Florida) Herald, September 12, 1918. 

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 13, 2018, 12:26:28 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 13, 1918.

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Troops of the 107th Infantry Regiment, American 27th Division following tanks near Beauquesnes, 13 September 1918. One platoon of infantry follows one tank.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205218820 © IWM (Q 57694)

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Wreckage of a German Hannover CL.IIIA biplane brought down in the British lines, near Inchy, 13 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247464 © IWM (Q 11915)

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Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line. German 7.7 cm (770 mm) FK 16 gun captured at Pronville and occasionally used by British gunners, 13 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238926 © IWM (Q 7070)

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Second Battle of Arras. A horse ambulance (2/3rd London Field Ambulance of the Royal Army Medical Corps) and a stranded tank (named Lucretia II 6012) rendered useless by gas in the attacks of 24 August, at the crossroads. Croisilles, 13 September 1918. (Captured by 56th Division on 28 August).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238935 © IWM (Q 7080)

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Returned refugees in the ruins of Villers-Bretonneux, 13th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246943 © IWM (Q 11339)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 13, 2018, 12:46:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Kendrick (Idaho) Gazette September 13, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 13, 2018, 12:51:11 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 13, 2018, 12:57:15 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 13, 2018, 01:19:48 AM
Dick Haymes was born on September 13, 1918.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 14, 2018, 12:43:53 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 14, 1918.

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A French 194 mm naval gun on railway mounting near Dieulouard (Dieulwart), 14 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086606 © IWM (Q 108352)

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A British cyclist passing ruins of the Town Hall in Combles, 14 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323507 © IWM (Q 78747)

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Military lorries passing through ruins of the village of Combles, 14 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323504 © IWM (Q 78744)

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A German cemetery at Beaulencourt, 14 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323510 © IWM (Q 78750)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 14, 2018, 01:06:11 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Chicago Eagle, September 14, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 15, 2018, 12:38:33 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 15, 1918.

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A view of the ruins of Bethune including the Belfry, 15th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246941 © IWM (Q 11337)

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Cross-cutting contest at the Forestry Camp near Pont Remy, 15 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238932 © IWM (Q 7077)

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Sports at the Forestry Camp near Pont Remy, 15 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238934 © IWM (Q 7079)

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Log chopping contest at the Forestry Camp near Pont Remy in which Australia beat Great Britain Canada and New Zealand, 15 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238931 © IWM (Q 7076)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 15, 2018, 12:49:02 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 15, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246941 © IWM (Q 11337)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238932 © IWM (Q 7077)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238934 © IWM (Q 7079)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238931 © IWM (Q 7076)
Quite shocking!
Cross-cutting shoulda been on real trees. Or if felled already higher up from dirt or efficiency!  But for war effort upright still. Then also can use tractors, dozers, or tanks to knock em down
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 15, 2018, 01:24:50 AM
Quite shocking!
Cross-cutting shoulda been on real trees. Or if felled already higher up from dirt or efficiency!  But for war effort upright still. Then also can use tractors, dozers, or tanks to knock em down

Quite a number of trees around that forest camp.  They must have done a good job of dodging the high explosive shells.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 15, 2018, 01:28:37 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Bisbee (Arizona) Daily Review, September 15, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 15, 2018, 01:46:22 AM
Comedian Nipsey Russell was born on September 15, 1918.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nipsey_Russell

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Nipsey Russell in 1971.
By Unknown - Detroit News, ebay.com, front of photo, back of photo, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29988778

Also, the first El Fenix Mexican restaurant opened in Dallas, Texas on September 15, 1918.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Fenix_(restaurant)

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El Fenix Restaurant in Downtown Dallas.
By Jamey Key - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1699688
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 16, 2018, 12:31:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 16, 1918.

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GHQ Signals in the ramparts of Montreuil, 16th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245133 © IWM (Q 9377)

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GHQ Signals in the ramparts of Montreuil, 16th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245132 © IWM (Q 9376)

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GHQ Signals in the ramparts of Montreuil, 16th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245134 © IWM (Q 9378)

 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 16, 2018, 01:02:25 AM
From the Library of Congress, September 16, 1918.


The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings

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The Seattle Star

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 16, 2018, 11:57:05 AM
I am about to ascend to Elluminati status.   I wanted it to happen here. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 16, 2018, 02:11:21 PM
I am about to ascend to Elluminati status.   I wanted it to happen here.

Well thanks, Walks.  I'm honored that you picked this thread.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 17, 2018, 12:55:37 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 17, 1918.

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Remains of Lieutenant Junor's BE 12 aeroplane. On 16 September 1918, Lt Junor of the Royal Flying Corps was tasked with providing air cover while Arab forces under the command of T E Lawrence attempted to destroy the Yarmuk section of the Hejaz Railway. Junor successfully diverted the attention of Turkish aircraft. When he returned "still alive, though attended on three sides by enemy machines, spitting bullets", Junor made a crash landing and escaped from the aircraft just before a Turkish aircraft dropped a bomb on it.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205018869 © IWM (Q 60019)

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Cavalry on manoeuvres crossing the Authie River, Auxi-le-Chateau, 17th September 1918. Note Hotchkiss Gun Tripod on pack horse.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245083 © IWM (Q 9313)

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A notice displayed in the centre of the town of Amiens, 17 September 1918. Notice reads: "SOLDIERS. It is your duty to respect the property of our allies. Remember that their husbands and sons are fighting our common enemy. Would you like to think that your homes were being looted whilst you were at the front? PLAY THE GAME".
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205264036

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A
Quote
Refugee woman sitting in a chair on a heap of ruins in Amiens, 17th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246946 © IWM (Q 11342)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 18, 2018, 12:51:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 18, 1918.

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45th Australian Battalion attacking the Hindenburg Line. Ascension Valley, near Le Verguier, 18 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194971 © IWM (E(AUS) 3260)

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Men of the 45th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force attacking the Hindenburg Line, near Le Verguier, Ascension Valley.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216645 © IWM (E(AUS) 3248)

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A lorry of the 32nd Division crossing a temporary bridge just completed by the Royal Engineers in place of one which had been destroyed by the Germans, over the Somme at Monchy-Lagache, 18th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245089 © IWM (Q 9319)

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Battle of Epehy. A Dressing Station with British and German wounded in foreground (Note ambulance and Chaplain kneeling by a stretcher case) and 6-inch howitzer battery in action in the open in the background, 65th Field Ambulance, 21st Division, near Epehy, 18th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246936 © IWM (Q 11332)

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An incident at an advanced field dressing station during the recent allied push. A British padre saying a prayer over a dying German, near Epehy, 18th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246940 © IWM (Q 11336)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 18, 2018, 01:30:00 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Washington (DC) Times, September 18, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 19, 2018, 12:50:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 19, 1918.

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Sopwith Buffalo two-seat fighter/reconnaissance biplane. Serial number H5892. First experimental machine.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205314745 © IWM (Q 67518)

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Mines loaded on a light railway on their way to the quay at Inverness, 18 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205261031 © IWM (Q 20251)

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Mines being loaded into barges for transport to minelayers at Inverness, 18 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205261032 © IWM (Q 20252)

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American minelayer USS SHAWMUT at Inverness, 19 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205261043 © IWM (Q 20264)
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 20, 2018, 01:16:24 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 20, 1918.

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The Battle of Megiddo, 20 September 1918: Turkish carts and gun carriages destroyed by British aircraft on the Nablus-Beisan road.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195240 © IWM (Q 12310)

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Mines on track launching deck of the American minelayer USS SAN FRANCISCO. North Sea, 20 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205261037 © IWM

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HMS VAMPIRE laying a smokescreen around the American minelayer USS SHAWMUT in the North Sea, 20 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205024645 © IWM (Q 20259)




Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 20, 2018, 01:36:18 AM
From the Library of Congress, September 20, 1918.


The Tonopah Daily Bonanza

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The Seattle Star

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Starbuck Twitch on September 20, 2018, 05:50:54 PM

From the Library of Congress, September 20, 1918.

The Seattle Star

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It's good to see that ol' Ev is still as fiery as ever.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 20, 2018, 06:09:55 PM
It's good to see that ol' Ev is still as fiery as ever.

Ha, he sure is.  I like it when he sticks up for women and kids.  Earlier in the week he sent a guy to the hospital for not voting.  I don't care to see him go all overboard like that.  But if a guy is blowing cigar or cigarette smoke in his face, well, pound away.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 21, 2018, 12:30:36 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 21, 1918.

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A detachment of the Australian Light Horse Brigade, 5th Battalion, entering the town of Nablus, thirty miles north of Jerusalem, 21 September 1918. General Allenby's rapid advance in Palestine during the last year of the war and the destruction of two Turkish armies was due in no small measure to his strong cavalry force which included Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205213146 © IWM (Q 12331)

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Flour carriers of an Australian Field Bakery at work. Heavy work but Australians make light of it. Australian Field Bakeries (South), Rouen, France.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357552 © IWM (E(AUS) 3465)

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Bakers of an Australian Field Bakery at work. View of a section of the ovens - a batch being drawn. Rouen, France. Australian Field Bakeries (South).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357555 © IWM (E(AUS) 3463)

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Bread being stacked to await packing at a Bread Store of an Australian Field Bakery. Rouen, France. Australian Field Bakeries (South).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357557 © IWM (E(AUS) 3462)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 21, 2018, 01:03:35 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, September 21, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 22, 2018, 12:57:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 22, 1918.

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Battle of Sharon. 131st Brigade, 60th Division, escorting 1200 prisoners taken by the Desert Mounted Corps, from Kerkur to Tul Keram, 22nd September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195236 © IWM (Q 12326)

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The mixing machine in which the flour is mixed, blended and converted into dough at an Australian Field Bakery. Rouen, France. Australian Field Bakeries (North).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357560 © IWM (E(AUS) 3486)

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A batch of bread being drawn from one of the ovens at an Australian Field Bakery. Rouen, France. Australian Field Bakeries (North).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357561 © IWM (E(AUS) 3488)

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Section of bread store showing stacks of bread waiting to be packed at an Australian Field Bakery. Rouen, France. Australian Field Bakeries (North).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357558 © IWM (E(AUS) 3436)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 22, 2018, 01:20:52 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee, September 22, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 22, 2018, 01:37:33 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 13, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205218820 © IWM (Q 57694)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247464 © IWM (Q 11915)


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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238926 © IWM (Q 7070)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238935 © IWM (Q 7080)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246943 © IWM (Q 11339)

Comment about the top pic...
Going to say that is Mk V Female. It looks like it is equipped with machine guns in the gun bays. The male version would have had 57mm cannons in those bays plus IIRC a mg in a forward firing bay for use against soft targets.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on September 22, 2018, 01:42:06 AM


After seeing all the death and destruction in World War I, I still find it hard to believe they thought it was a good idea to try it again a mere 21 years later. And gave it a real strong effort too. I hope someday people get tired of killing each other.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 23, 2018, 12:48:35 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 23, 1918.

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Bird's-eye view of Haifa, taken on the day of its capture by the Jodhpore and Mysore Lancers, 15th (Imperial Service) Cavalry Brigade, supported by "B" Battery Honourable Artillery Company, 23rd September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247855 © IWM (Q 12337)

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Indian cavalry of the Jodhpore and Mysore Lancers, 16th (Imperial Service) Cavalry Brigade passing through Haifa following the city's capture from Turkey (Ottoman Empire), 23rd September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194923 © IWM (Q 12335)

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American minelayer USS SAN FRANCISCO in dry dock at Invergordon, 23 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205261042 © IWM (Q 20263)

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Submarine R-27 ready for launching. 23rd September 1918.
  https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205093267 © IWM (Q 68441)


Here is a picture of the R-27 a couple years later:
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United States Navy submarine R-27, possibly off Hawaii.
By U.S. Navy photograph - http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08104.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20272847
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 23, 2018, 01:25:15 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, September 23, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 23, 2018, 09:59:26 AM
The Meuse-Argonne Offensive was launched 100 years ago today.  The objective for the Americans was the railroad hub at Sedan.
It would pit the U.S. First Army commanded by John Pershing against the German Fifth Army commanded by  Georg von der Marwitz.
It would be considered a success but over 26,000 Americans would die and another 100,000 would be wounded.

Pershing
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Georg von der Marwitz
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Prior to the start of the battle, the bulk of the U.S. forces had to be shifted from St. Mihiel in a very short time.  This was accomplished
and it was considered to be a logistical miracle.   The man in charge of that was a young Colonel named George C. Marshall.

At 5:30 AM on the 26th the American attack began.  Most objectives were met but the Germans held out at Montfaucon - which slowed the entire operation and allowed the Germans to regroup.  Here was the plan:

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 23, 2018, 10:09:03 AM
After seeing all the death and destruction in World War I, I still find it hard to believe they thought it was a good idea to try it again a mere 21 years later. And gave it a real strong effort too. I hope someday people get tired of killing each other.

WW II was pretty much just a continuation of WW I. The real reasons for Germany's defeat were never addressed and punitive reparations demanded by the French didn't help one.

Plus the largest Army in Western Europe was only prepared to fight the last war despite all the technological advances of last 20 years.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 23, 2018, 10:14:58 AM
This is not a criticism at Rikki Gins, I love these photos you are posting.

I would like a uncaptioned photo or two just to test my knowledge of the equipment and people involved.

Keep them coming!


 :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on September 23, 2018, 10:20:02 AM
This is not a criticism at Rikki Gins, I love these photos you are posting.

I would like a uncaptioned photo or two just to test my knowledge of the equipment and people involved. involved.

Keep them coming!


 :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 23, 2018, 10:28:49 AM


The mythical Swiss Army tank?

LoL

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 23, 2018, 11:41:08 AM
This is not a criticism at Rikki Gins, I love these photos you are posting.

I would like a uncaptioned photo or two just to test my knowledge of the equipment and people involved.

Keep them coming!


 :)

Good thinking.  When I find an Imperial War Museum pic that has lots of weaponry or vehicles, I'll just put the date under it.  Those links at the bottom of the pics, plus the last set of reference numbers are all that is required by the IWM when people want to download their photos and post them elsewhere.  Not a bad deal, actually.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 23, 2018, 05:03:49 PM
Good thinking.  When I find an Imperial War Museum pic that has lots of weaponry or vehicles, I'll just put the date under it.  Those links at the bottom of the pics, plus the last set of reference numbers are all that is required by the IWM when people want to download their photos and post them elsewhere.  Not a bad deal, actually.

Looking forward to the next set of pics! We have less than 2 months WW I history left to cover before it runs out. Would you consider skipping ahead to the WW II time line or run a concurrent thread?

Although the Soviet-Polish War is a little known topic that is also fascinating to probably should be covered.

Not asking for much am I?

 ;D

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 23, 2018, 06:19:15 PM
Looking forward to the next set of pics! We have less than 2 months WW I history left to cover before it runs out. Would you consider skipping ahead to the WW II time line or run a concurrent thread?

Although the Soviet-Polish War is a little known topic that is also fascinating to probably should be covered.

Not asking for much am I?

 ;D
I think we should stick to time-line because I'm looking forward to the Finnish Civil War, Russian Revolution and Civil War, and then the Winter War (Soviets vs Finland) etc. Plus maybe frequent radio caller Bill from Madison will post little known details about Finnish history!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisu

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4
This dude would chew snow so the Reds couldn't see his breath, iron sites (to avoid being detected and cold effects on scope, and had over 500+ confirmed kills- to jump ahead some years.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 23, 2018, 08:41:03 PM
I think we should stick to time-line because I'm looking forward to the Finnish Civil War, Russian Revolution and Civil War, and then the Winter War (Soviets vs Finland) etc. Plus maybe frequent radio caller Bill from Madison will post little known details about Finnish history!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisu

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4
This dude would chew snow so the Reds couldn't see his breath, iron sites (to avoid being detected and cold effects on scope, and had over 500+ confirmed kills- to jump ahead some years.
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Ahhh....Seymo Heyha IIRC.  Can't believe he's a real Soumi though. Not a single umlaut in his name.

 :P

The Soviet-Polish war also took place during the 1919-1920 time frame. So lets wait then.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 01:30:43 AM
Looking forward to the next set of pics! We have less than 2 months WW I history left to cover before it runs out. Would you consider skipping ahead to the WW II time line or run a concurrent thread?

Although the Soviet-Polish War is a little known topic that is also fascinating to probably should be covered.

Not asking for much am I?

 ;D

No, not too much. ;D Thanks, I wish I could have the time to open some threads on other periods of history but I'm going to stick with the 100 years ago thread.  I think some interesting events will be coming up after WWI is over.  Uppermost, I guess, the deadly Spanish Influenza of 1918.  I'm pretty sure that it will continue on into 1919.  I would like to see you start a thread on WWII.  I would certainly enjoy reading it, and perhaps you could start it out on December 7th and do some day by day coverage of what was happening 77 years ago?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 01:38:44 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 24, 1918.

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A gun crew posing between an odd looking pair of guns. September 24, 1918.
© IWM (Q 11777)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 02:17:15 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Sun, September 24, 1918.
(Kind of a downer of an article, but such pieces were common in newspapers 100 years ago.)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 02:23:17 AM
Audra Lindley, television's Helen Roper, was born on September 24, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audra_Lindley
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 24, 2018, 11:41:14 AM
No, not too much. ;D Thanks, I wish I could have the time to open some threads on other periods of history but I'm going to stick with the 100 years ago thread.  I think some interesting events will be coming up after WWI is over.  Uppermost, I guess, the deadly Spanish Influenza of 1918.  I'm pretty sure that it will continue on into 1919.  I would like to see you start a thread on WWII.  I would certainly enjoy reading it, and perhaps you could start it out on December 7th and do some day by day coverage of what was happening 77 years ago?

I'm thinking about it. I'm no writer of even a decent researcher. Just a history buff.

To do WW II any real justice, I would need to start when the Sino-Japanese War started. That period in history is also overlooked and interesting in its own right.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 24, 2018, 06:20:39 PM
I'm thinking about it. I'm no writer of even a decent researcher. Just a history buff.

To do WW II any real justice, I would need to start when the Sino-Japanese War started. That period in history is also overlooked and interesting in its own right.

...and possibly the Italians activities in East Africa and the Spanish Civil War.  At least to help set the stage.   

If you do it @Exile I'll do what I can to help.  As my time allows anyway................
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 24, 2018, 06:45:26 PM
...and possibly the Italians activities in East Africa and the Spanish Civil War.  At least to help set the stage.   

If you do it @Exile I'll do what I can to help.  As my time allows anyway................
And "the Great Game" needs to be covered.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Game

https://www.amazon.com/Great-Game-Struggle-Central-Kodansha/dp/1568360223

https://www.amazon.com/Peter-Hopkirk/e/B00JOP2AOG/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 24, 2018, 06:51:37 PM
Hey Rix. 

Is it okay if I hop back a month or so to August?  I know there were Americans involved in the Russian Civil War and they weren't alone - British, French, Czech, Greeks, Italians, Chinese, Japanese all were involved to some extent but I don't really know much about it.    I think the Americans involvement starts in August 1918 in Siberia.  Looks like it might be an interesting little offshoot to look into.

Americans in Vladivostok in August 1918,
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 24, 2018, 06:58:04 PM
And "the Great Game" needs to be covered.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Game

https://www.amazon.com/Great-Game-Struggle-Central-Kodansha/dp/1568360223

https://www.amazon.com/Peter-Hopkirk/e/B00JOP2AOG/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

and you are just the dude to cover it.  With all the time on your hands after fleeing the Dietrich thread......................
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 24, 2018, 06:58:14 PM
Hey Rix. 

Is it okay if I hop back a month or so to August?  I know there were Americans involved in the Russian Civil War and they weren't alone - British, French, Czech, Greeks, Italians, Chinese, Japanese all were involved to some extent but I don't really know much about it.    I think the Americans involvement starts in August 1918 in Siberia.  Looks like it might be an interesting little offshoot to look into.

Americans in Vladivostok in August 1918,
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The White Movement was too diverse and had too many competing interests, goals, and ideologies.

ps: there was a prominent Admiral and Polar Explorer named Kolchak who was prominently involved. Later his grandson would  carry on the family's bravery by becoming an intrepid reporter.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 24, 2018, 06:59:17 PM
and you are just the dude to cover it.  With all the time on your hands after fleeing the Dietrich thread......................

Now you are making seem like YP with all this "fleeing" business. I simply haven't tuned in for a while....  ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 24, 2018, 07:06:27 PM
The White Movement was too diverse and had too many competing interests, goals, and ideologies.

ps: there was a prominent Admiral and Polar Explorer named Kolchak who was prominently involved. Later his grandson would  carry on the family's bravery by becoming an intrepid reporter.

Well I've started to look into it just a tad.  Trying to figure out what 11,000 Americans were supposed to accomplish in the middle of all that mess.  As usual..."Follow the money"
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 24, 2018, 07:19:52 PM
Hey Rix. 

Is it okay if I hop back a month or so to August?  I know there were Americans involved in the Russian Civil War and they weren't alone - British, French, Czech, Greeks, Italians, Chinese, Japanese all were involved to some extent but I don't really know much about it.    I think the Americans involvement starts in August 1918 in Siberia.  Looks like it might be an interesting little offshoot to look into.

Americans in Vladivostok in August 1918,
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By all means, Walks, that would be great.  I actually read a book about that Polar Bear Expedition, a number of years back.  All I can remember about it was that some of the American troops went through some awful depravations...mostly starving and being frozen.  I'd love to hear about it.  Anything that happened in 1918 period, is fine for the thread.  Plus, you know me, give a year here, take a year there, fine.  I'm always happy to have other EllGabbers contribute to the thread.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 24, 2018, 07:22:08 PM
By all means, Walks, that would be great.  I actually read a book about that Polar Bear Expedition, a number of years back.  All I can remember about it was that some of the American troops went through some awful depravations...mostly starving and being frozen.  I'd love to hear about it.  Anything that happened in 1918 period, is fine for the thread.  Plus, you know me, give a year here, take a year there, fine.  I'm always happy to have other EllGabbers contribute to the thread.

Didn't think you would mind but always best to check with the boss!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 24, 2018, 07:49:49 PM
...and possibly the Italians activities in East Africa and the Spanish Civil War.  At least to help set the stage.   

If you do it @Exile I'll do what I can to help.  As my time allows anyway................

I'm playing a war game via vassal right now that simulates the 1941 campaign to eliminate the Italian presence in East Africa.  Also gamed out the Spanish Civil War too.

No account of WW II would be complete without mentioning these. @Walks_At_Night Resources mainly. My knowledge is very limited to whats out there.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 25, 2018, 12:25:50 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 25, 1918.

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The observer and pilot in a Handley Page bomber: the former in the nose, equipped with a Lewis gun on a Scarff ring and the latter in his cockpit just in rear of front observer, it is fitted with two sets of controls. Near Cressy, 25 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245687 © IWM (Q 9972)

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The observer and pilot in the nose of a Handley Page Bomber, showing a Lewis gun on a Scarff ring and the bomb-sight of the former. Near Cressy, 25 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245688 © IWM (Q 9973)

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A Caproni triple engine bomber ascending at the aerodrome of the American First Army Corps. Souilly, 25 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205312762 © IWM (Q 65568)

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Long line of German prisoners coming down a French communication trench led by two of their officers, 25 September 1918. Tahure region, Marne.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315525 © IWM (Q 70062)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 12:55:54 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 26, 1918.
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An American 14 inch gun on railway mounting near Tincourt, 26 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205085734 © IWM (Q 64699)

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An American 340 mm gun under camouflage covering near Baleycourt, 26 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086607 © IWM (Q 108353)

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An American 340 mm railway gun firing at Baleycourt near Verdun, 26 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205359137 © IWM (Q 69946)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 01:59:36 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Herald, (New Orleans) September 26, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 26, 2018, 02:01:25 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 26, 2018, 09:40:08 PM
12k Dead and 100k wounded out of 1.2 million engaged. Less than a 10% casualty rate. Something the Brits and Frogs rarely achieved.

You can chalk some of it to knowledge shared and the rest for Americans refusing to bow to conventional wisdom.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 27, 2018, 12:36:33 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 27, 1918.

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German prisoners taken by the 4th Canadian Division during its crossing of the Canal du Nord on 27 September 1918. The prisoners are near Inchy, which was just behind the Canadian sector of the front, to the west of the canal.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216503 © IWM (CO 3302)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 27, 2018, 01:14:12 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The St. Helens (Oregon) Mist, September 27, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 27, 2018, 02:07:42 AM
These letters bring the home the point that there were real people fighting this war, living through real hell. Not just some figure in a long forgotten history book.

Thank you for keeping their history alive.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 27, 2018, 11:55:39 PM
These letters bring the home the point that there were real people fighting this war, living through real hell. Not just some figure in a long forgotten history book.

Thank you for keeping their history alive.

Very welcome, my friend.  Yes, those letters are quite telling.  It surprises me how well written some of them are.  The soldiers all seem to possess a similer style of describing things.  A certain type of expression that was prevelent in that particular generation, I guess.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 28, 2018, 12:33:00 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 28, 1918.

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Battle of the Canal du Nord. A German Gun Barrel on a travelling carriage abandoned by the roadside, near Moeuvres, 28th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245103 © IWM (Q 9338)

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Battle of Canal du Nord. Royal Engineers bridging the Canal du Nord near Moeuvres, 28th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216488 © IWM (Q 9344)

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'C' Battery of the American 108th Field Artillery Regiment (formerly 2nd Regiment Field Artillery and 1st Cavalry Pennsylvania National Guard) firing a salvo from the ruins of Varennes after the retreating enemy, 28 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205283670 © IWM (Q 49850)

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Prisoners captured in the Battle of the Canal du Nord in a 'cage' near Bapaume, 28th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245108 © IWM (Q 9343)

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Battle of the Canal du Nord. Cooks of the Liverpool Regiment at work in the basin of the Canal near a lock near Moeuvres, 28 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216490 © IWM (Q 9641)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on September 28, 2018, 12:39:29 AM
Some of those POWs look awful happy.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 28, 2018, 01:05:39 AM
Some of those POWs look awful happy.

I know.  I'd be happy too if I was one of them.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 28, 2018, 01:12:42 AM
From the Imperial War Museum.  The Seattle Star, September 28, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 28, 2018, 11:03:45 AM
Some of those POWs look awful happy.

One reason is that they would be getting their first real meal in ages. By this time in the war, the German ability to supply the diet a soldier needed to keep fighting was getting very hard to do.

Foodstuff imports was a very important part of German pre war trade because they could not provide it on their own.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pate on September 28, 2018, 09:14:44 PM
I drive by this monument fairly frequently.  Major Davis apparently died 100 years ago today 29SEP1918.

I just happened to stop an snap a photo a few weeks ago when all the flags were at half-mast for McCain I think.

Well, Major Davis, in my book the flag is at half-mast for you sir.  Thank you for your service.

EditToAdd:  Text on the monument:

MAJOR MURRAY DAVIS D.S.C.
KILLED IN ACTION AT EXERMONT FRANCE
SEPTEMBER TWENTY NINTH MCMXVIII
SERIOUSLY WOUNDED HE REFUSED TO
RELINQUISH HIS COMMAND UNTIL MOR-
TALLY WOUNDED HE FELL LEADING HIS
COMRADES TO VICTORY HIS LAST WORDS
"TAKE CARE OF MY MEN"
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on September 28, 2018, 09:52:00 PM
Some of those POWs look awful happy.
Wait 'til next time and see how happy they are to avoid the Soviets taking them prisoner.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on September 29, 2018, 09:48:34 AM
Wait 'til next time and see how happy they are to avoid the Soviets taking them prisoner.

I just got done reading a book called "End Game 1945" It chronicles the last three months of the war in Europe and the aftermath. Although the official end of the war was May 7, Germans troops will still fighting their way across the Elbe river way past that date.

In small groups, they were still getting through until at least early August 1945. Some probably never officially surrendered when they got back to the western zones. Just melt back into the civilian population.

The book is a good read. I recommend it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 29, 2018, 11:36:20 AM
I drive by this monument fairly frequently.  Major Davis apparently died 100 years ago today 29SEP1918.

I just happened to stop an snap a photo a few weeks ago when all the flags were at half-mast for McCain I think.

Well, Major Davis, in my book the flag is at half-mast for you sir.  Thank you for your service.

EditToAdd:  Text on the monument:

MAJOR MURRAY DAVIS D.S.C.
KILLED IN ACTION AT EXERMONT FRANCE
SEPTEMBER TWENTY NINTH MCMXVIII
SERIOUSLY WOUNDED HE REFUSED TO
RELINQUISH HIS COMMAND UNTIL MOR-
TALLY WOUNDED HE FELL LEADING HIS
COMRADES TO VICTORY HIS LAST WORDS
"TAKE CARE OF MY MEN"

Thank you, pate.  Great picture of the monument.  I was going to respond to your post last night but I couldn't gain access to the website.  Anyway, I just wanted you to know that I came across some further information on what took place on this day, 100 years ago.  Taken from The Evening Missourian., November 23, 1918.

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Info on the park: https://kcparks.org/places/murray-davis/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on September 29, 2018, 12:00:26 PM
Thank you, pate.  Great picture of the monument.  I was going to respond to your post last night but I couldn't gain access to the website.  Anyway, I just wanted you to know that I came across some further information on what took place on this day, 100 years ago.  Taken from The Evening Missourian., November 23, 1918.

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Info on the park: https://kcparks.org/places/murray-davis/

True hero. Thanks Rikki
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pate on September 29, 2018, 03:57:41 PM
Thank you, pate.  Great picture of the monument.  I was going to respond to your post last night but I couldn't gain access to the website.  Anyway, I just wanted you to know that I came across some further information on what took place on this day, 100 years ago.  Taken from The Evening Missourian., November 23, 1918.

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Info on the park: https://kcparks.org/places/murray-davis/

I found an article somewhere that said he died five days after his 31st birthday.

Happened to drive by the monument today and it did not appear any ceremony was happening today...  there were TWO individuals working for the Main Street Merchants picking up trash, flag was no longer at half-staff.  I was tempted to tell them to put it at half-mast but didn't....
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 29, 2018, 04:23:38 PM
True hero. Thanks Rikki

My pleasure.  I'm glad that pate brought the hero officer to my attention.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 29, 2018, 04:45:13 PM
I found an article somewhere that said he died five days after his 31st birthday.

Happened to drive by the monument today and it did not appear any ceremony was happening today...  there were TWO individuals working for the Main Street Merchants picking up trash, flag was no longer at half-staff.  I was tempted to tell them to put it at half-mast but didn't....

Yes, too bad the local press didn't pick up on the major's death occurring 100 years ago.  But that happens.  Every once in a great while I come across an article or video that somebody made about people and events from exactly 100 years ago.  At least we did our own small part in commemorating the major's heroic deeds on September 29, 1918.  That is one of the things that I enjoy about operating this thread.  Thanks for bringing the major and his monument to my attention, pate.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 30, 2018, 01:43:30 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, September 30, 1918.

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Kadem Station, terminus of the Hijaz Railway, the store yard of which was set on fire before the Turks and Germans left Damascus. The Station and all houses around it were completely destroyed. Two troops of the Gloucester Yeomanry unsuccessfully attempted to seize the powerful enemy wireless plant at Kadem, but the Station was blown up as they rode in, 30th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247880 © IWM (Q 12372)

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The Battle of Megiddo, September 1918: The remains of Kadem Station, a terminus of the Hejaz railway, which was set on fire by the retreating Germans and Turks, 30th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195243 © IWM (Q 12371)

Quote
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Capture of Damascus. Some of the prisoners captured in the Barada Gorge by the 3rd and 5th Australian Light Horse Brigade, 30th September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205195238 © IWM (Q 12353)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on September 30, 2018, 02:36:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, September 30, 1918.

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Sadly, Walter wouldn't survive the war.  If I remember right, (and it has been quite a number of years since I researched it) he was an observer in a navy plane that was shot down over water, sometime in October.  He was listed as missing for quite awhile.  The Ashland High School football stadium is still named after him.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on September 30, 2018, 08:21:31 PM
So with Rix's permission, I am going to take a little detour and go back a bit to determine how American troops ended up in Siberia in August 1918.     

We have to start with the Czechoslovak Legion.   These guys were pretty cool.  At the outbreak of the war, a group of Czechs and Slovaks that were living in the borders
of the Russian Empire petitioned the Czar to support the independence of their homelands from Austria-Hungry in the event of an Entente victory.  To assist they formed
a small military organization and were attached to the Russian 3rd Army in October, 1914.  Their leadership desired to transform themselves into a powerful military
force but for that they needed more man power.   While the practice was officially banned, they recruited more Czechs and Slovaks from POW camps and also through
gaining a number of deserters from the Austrian-Hungarian army.

The unit would fight well and they were the only group to have success during the disastrous Kerensky Campaign of 1917.  It's failure would hasten the fall of the Czar
and in the Autumn of 1917 the Bolsheviks would make their move. They would take over Moscow and Saint Petersburg and began talks with Germany and Austria-Hungry
on ending the conflict.  In early March, 1918 the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed and Russia was officially out of the war.   A large portion of the Ukraine was ceded
to the Central Powers and this was were the Legion was based at the time.  They were very nearly cutoff and surrounded by the Germans and they had to fight
their way out in a 5 day retreat.  Eventually they were safe but where to go?  They wanted to get back into the War but they couldn't go West, North - the Bolsheviks
and Germans were too strong.  They considering heading South but that was full of uncertainties.   So they decided to head East.  The plan was to cross all of Russia
and then pick up transport in Vladivostok which would then take them around the World to France where they could get back in the fight.  Wow.

The trip was painfully slow.  Most of the rail lines were packed with German and Austrian POWs headed home in the opposite direction after the treaty was signed.
When Berlin learned that were over 60,000 soldiers trying to join the Entente they were none to pleased and they demanded that the Bolshevik's stop them.  The
communist's were worried of renewed hostilities and they complied.   On May 14th the Bolsheviks closed the rail line at Chelyabinsk some 1,000 miles east of
Moscow.  The Legion won easily and an all out war broke out between the Legion and the Bolsheviks.  It doesn't seem like it was much of a contest.  They became
an army of the rails and they began seizing territory all along the Trans-Siberian Railway. By the summer of 1918 they were in control of a strip running from the
Volga River all the way to the Pacific.

They converted the trains into essentially rolling cities with barracks, bakeries, workshops and hospitals.  Some of the rail cars were fitted out with heavy artillery
and were fortified.   They also managed to liberate a substantial haul of the Czar's gold reserves and took that with them too.   They allied themselves with the
White Russians and as they closed in on  Yekaterinburg the Reds were worried that the Legion might yet save the Czar so the entire family was liquidated.


The Legion continued eastward to Vladivostok where they would link up with a multinational force of American, Canadian, British, French, Italian and Japanese troops that
had arrived their to secure their escape route.   We'll discuss in the next post.


Legionnaire Uniforms
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Legionnaires in the field
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Legionnaire Trains
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Here is a 10 minute audio segment on the Legion:
https://www.radio.cz/mp3/podcast/en/czechs/100818-the-czechoslovak-legions-myth-reality-gold-and-glory.mp3
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 01, 2018, 12:38:18 AM
Fascinating.  Looking forward to part two.  Thanks, Walks. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WhiteCrow on October 01, 2018, 12:56:49 AM
Fascinating.  Looking forward to part two.  Thanks, Walks.

Yes! Excellent..thanks
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 01, 2018, 12:58:08 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 1, 1918.

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A head and shoulders portrait of Lawrence in Arab headdress.  Painted by James McBey, on October 1, 1918.  (One can perhaps attribute McBey's position as a successful and respectable outsider in the art world to his being self-taught, a characteristic that has sometimes irritated the establishment. It seems entirely in keeping with this impression we have of the artist that, while recording everything he saw as he went through Palestine and Syria with the British Expeditionary Force between 1917 and 1918, he also chose to paint the portrait of another outsider, Lawrence of Arabia, albeit one who was rapidly becoming a celebrity.)
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/18131 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2473)

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Fifth Battle of Ypres. Royal Artillery limbers and pack mules of the 29th Division on the Menin Road at Hooge, 1 October 1918. Note a crater in the foreground.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247352 © IWM (Q 11796)

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43rd American Balloon Company moving to a forward area by means of both motor and horse transport. Bertran Farm, 1 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028794 © IWM (Q 70182)

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Battle of Ypres. A prisoner with a man of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, 29th Division by the side of the Menin Road at Gheluvelt, 1 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247322 © IWM (Q 11764)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 01, 2018, 11:52:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 1, 1918.

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 https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/18131 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2473)


I was interested to learn a few years ago that our military, and presumably some others (?,) still have official painters whose job is to paint war scenes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Art_Program
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_official_war_artists

An example:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_D._Fay
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 02, 2018, 02:13:05 AM
I was interested to learn a few years ago that our military, and presumably some others (?,) still have official painters whose job is to paint war scenes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Art_Program
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_official_war_artists

An example:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_D._Fay

Interesting.  Thanks mr. a.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 02, 2018, 02:28:15 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 2, 1918.

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A British Mark IV female tank, captured and used by the Germans, blown up by a mine and destroyed by French artillery. North of Perthes, 2 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205282970 © IWM (Q 49089)

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A French Renault FT-17 tank, serial number 3151, on the road near St. Julien, 2 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205282968 © IWM (Q 49087)

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Battle of the St. Quentin Canal. Men of the 137th Brigade (46th Division) on a bank of the St Quentin Canal, which the brigade crossed on 29 September 1918. Near Bellenglise, 2 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216477 © IWM (Q 9509)

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Battle of St. Quentin Canal. Brigadier-General John Vaughan Campbell VC addressing men of the 137th Brigade (46th Division) on the Riqueval Bridge over the St. Quentin Canal (part of the German's Hindenburg Line) which they crossed on 29 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194706 © IWM (Q 9534)

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Battle of St Quentin Canal (Saint-Quentin). Prisoners in a clearing depot at Abbeville, 2nd October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245117 © IWM (Q 9358)

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A prisoner taken in the Battle of St Quentin Canal (Saint-Quentin) at a Clearing Depot, Abbeville, 2nd October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245116 © IWM (Q 9357)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 03, 2018, 01:19:43 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, October 3, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on October 03, 2018, 11:34:45 AM
WRT to the pic of the French FT-17 Tank. That specific model was a FT-17 SA model meaning it had a short barreled 37mm cannon in the turret. The most common model was equipped with a IIRC 7.5mm Hotchkiss machine gun.

A third and even rarer model was also produced. The FT-17 BS had a short barrel 75mm cannon that fired a pretty potent HE round for it's time.

According to wiki on 40 or so of 930 were produced before the end of the war.

I remember coming across a pic or two of them being used in action. Where I can't remember.

:(


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This pic is during testing IIRC
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 04, 2018, 12:43:09 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 4, 1918.

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Bridge across the Canal at La Bassee, blown up before German retirement, 4 October 1918. The town was taken over by the 2/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers (55th Division) previous afternoon.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247350 © IWM (Q 11793)

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A shell bursting in the ruins of Lens, 4 October 1918. The town was abandoned by Germans on 2 October 1918 and taken over by the British 58th Division.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247344 © IWM (Q 11787)

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Unidentified British official cameraman in the ruins of Lens, 4 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247340 © IWM (Q 11783)

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View of the ruins of La Bassee from a German observation post, 4 October 1918. The town was taken over by the 2/5th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers (55th Division) previous afternoon.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247349 © IWM (Q 11792)

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Royal Engineers of the 58th Division clearing a road in the ruins of Lens, 4 October 1918. The town was abandoned by Germans on 2 October 1918 and taken over by the British 58th Division.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247351 © IWM (Q 11794)

 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 04, 2018, 01:38:29 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grand Forks (North Dakota) Herald, October 4, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 05, 2018, 01:40:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 5, 1918.

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Ruins of the church at Lens, 5 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323534 © IWM (Q 78774)

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The waters of the River Lys invading Armentieres after the flood brought about by the retreating Germans, 5 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323528 © IWM (Q 78768)

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A wrecked cemetery near Gavrelle, 5 October 1918. The town, evacuated by the Germans and occupied by the 51st Division on 27 August, was taken over by 8th Division immediately afterwards.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087469 © IWM (Q 9568)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 05, 2018, 07:57:24 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grand Forks (North Dakota) Herald, October 4, 1918.

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It is spreading....

Interestingly the longer one served in the military, regardless of country, the mortality of the flu was less. Theories say that the mixing etc helped protect them before it really became virulent whereas populations back home(s) and new recruits had no, or little, defense against the "Spanish" flu and thus higher mortality.

The flu killed far more people than the actual War did. In India alone more people died from the flu than the total number of people in the War worldwide.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 06, 2018, 01:10:39 AM
It is spreading....

Interestingly the longer one served in the military, regardless of country, the mortality of the flu was less. Theories say that the mixing etc helped protect them before it really became virulent whereas populations back home(s) and new recruits had no, or little, defense against the "Spanish" flu and thus higher mortality.

The flu killed far more people than the actual War did. In India alone more people died from the flu than the total number of people in the War worldwide.

Yes, it is interesting to see that the press is finally coming around to reporting the severity of the disease.  At first they tried to put the kibosh on any panic by saying that not too many people were succumbing to it, but now, due to the numbers, they are announcing quarantines and such.

Here is another clipping from the Library of Congress and the October 6, 1918 issue of the Rogue River (Oregon) Courier.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 06, 2018, 06:55:57 PM
Yes, it is interesting to see that the press is finally coming around to reporting the severity of the disease.  At first they tried to put the kibosh on any panic by saying that not too many people were succumbing to it, but now, due to the numbers, they are announcing quarantines and such.

Here is another clipping from the Library of Congress and the October 6, 1918 issue of the Rogue River (Oregon) Courier.

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There was an interesting phenomena with this flu in that it was the most devastating but, then, decades later was hardly ever talked about. Almost "forgotten" in normal society, history, etc apparently. I'm not sure about medical circles etc but in normal places I don't recall hearing about it during discussions about WWI in school, at least through HS. Why? WWs talked about, Depression talked about, but not the flu? Fear? Wanting to forget? Over shadowed by wars which are "easier" to talk about? Recently (a few decades or so) it has been brought back up due to SARS, Ebola, and the flu vaccine push. And some "theories" ranging about the flu helping to end the war (so many young people and folks getting it) and also helping to "cause" WWII because Wilson was infected and allowed the French to go super-hard Versailles? Who knows, interesting theories.

http://admin.cambridge.org/academic/subjects/history/twentieth-century-american-history/americas-forgotten-pandemic-influenza-1918-2nd-edition
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Farm Penis on October 06, 2018, 07:09:14 PM
100 years ago my penis didn't exist yet.  Hahahahahaha  fuck, I can't believe how much I rule!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 06, 2018, 08:18:39 PM
There was an interesting phenomena with this flu in that it was the most devastating but, then, decades later was hardly ever talked about. Almost "forgotten" in normal society, history, etc apparently. I'm not sure about medical circles etc but in normal places I don't recall hearing about it during discussions about WWI in school, at least through HS. Why? WWs talked about, Depression talked about, but not the flu? Fear? Wanting to forget? Over shadowed by wars which are "easier" to talk about? Recently (a few decades or so) it has been brought back up due to SARS, Ebola, and the flu vaccine push. And some "theories" ranging about the flu helping to end the war (so many young people and folks getting it) and also helping to "cause" WWII because Wilson was infected and allowed the French to go super-hard Versailles? Who knows, interesting theories.

http://admin.cambridge.org/academic/subjects/history/twentieth-century-american-history/americas-forgotten-pandemic-influenza-1918-2nd-edition

You are right, one doesn't hear about the 1918 flu all that much.  Every once in awhile during flu season, somebody will predict an influenza epidemic that will rival the one of 1918 but thankfully, (so far, anyway) they have been wrong.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 07, 2018, 01:06:19 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 7, 1918.

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The canal in ruined Merville, 7 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323538 © IWM (Q 78778)

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Interior of the ruined church at Merville, 7 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323544 © IWM (Q 78784)

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Indian troops of the 7th Meerut Division washing transport horses at the mouth of the Nahr el-Kelb (Dog River), October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247917 © IWM (Q 12416)



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 07, 2018, 01:41:45 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 07, 2018, 01:56:22 AM
Recorded on July 22, 1918.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Jayzelady on October 07, 2018, 05:50:55 PM


Thought this was very cool from YouTube. Maybe some NYC EllGabbers can verify a bit.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 07, 2018, 06:47:52 PM


Thought this was very cool from YouTube. Maybe some NYC EllGabbers can verify a bit.
Nice. So funny, because I just think Buster Keaton due to the hats. Which were discussed here some ways back (there were attacks, and near riots, over hats and seasonal wearing of same once.)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 09, 2018, 12:27:15 AM


Thought this was very cool from YouTube. Maybe some NYC EllGabbers can verify a bit.

Thanks for posting here, Jayze.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 09, 2018, 01:04:14 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 9, 1918.

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Battle of St. Quentin Canal. Troops going forward in Albion lorries near Joncourt, 9 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245280 © IWM (Q 9530)

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A pictorial appeal (Zeichnet Kriegsanleihe 35 ID) for the war loan painted on a wall in the square at Brancourt by the 35th German Infantry Division, 9 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238943 © IWM (Q 7093)

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Capture of Cambrai by the British 57th Division. A patrol of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment in a burning street in the southern suburbs of Cambrai, 9 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087481 © IWM (Q 11363)

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Capture of Cambrai by the British 57th Division. Soldiers of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment wearing pickelhaubes which they found whilst on patrol in Cambrai, 9 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216088 © IWM (Q 11367)

 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 09, 2018, 01:45:50 AM
From the Library of Congress. The Daily Capital Journal, (Salem, Oregon) October 9, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 10, 2018, 03:24:54 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 10, 1918.

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Elizabeth McDonald, Territorial Force Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia contracted on duty 10 October 1918.
(I wonder if the pneumonia was the end result of contracting the Spanish Flu?)
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380845 © IWM (WWC H19-20)

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Hannah Dunlop Mark, Territorial Force Nursing Service. Died of pneumonia contracted on duty 10 October 1918.
(I wonder if the pneumonia was the end result of contracting the Spanish Flu?)
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380796 © IWM (WWC H19-19)



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 11, 2018, 12:54:29 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 11, 1918.

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A photograph of a ruined shop front, typical of the damage done by the Germans' delay action mines. Cambrai, 11 October 1918. Note a British soldier wearing a trophy pickelhaube.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247362 © IWM (Q 11807)

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Minelayer HMS Legion in the North Sea. Destroyer converted in 1917 to minelayer. Note dummy 4 inch gun and tubes painted on screens.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315555 © IWM (Q 70107)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pawpourri on October 11, 2018, 01:05:33 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 11, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247362 © IWM (Q 11807)

The little carriage with the doll inside...so eerie.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 11, 2018, 01:14:56 AM
The little carriage with the doll inside...so eerie.

It is.  Notice the ladder back inside of that room, leading to an upper floor.  It would be creepy having to walk around in those dim rooms.  Plus the dangers of stepping on nails, etc.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pawpourri on October 11, 2018, 01:36:31 AM
It is.  Notice the ladder back inside of that room, leading to an upper floor.  It would be creepy having to walk around in those dim rooms.  Plus the dangers of stepping on nails, etc.

The pictures really bring home war's devastation.  What the soldiers saw stayed with them forever.  No one that went through war could ever be the same again.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Bart Ell on October 11, 2018, 06:58:56 AM
The little carriage with the doll inside...so eerie.

If that photo was taken today people would say it was staged.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on October 11, 2018, 08:07:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 11, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315555 © IWM (Q 70107)


Sailor vs Soldier. "There's no way in hell I want to be a sitting duck"

Soldier vs Sailor. I can always dig my hole deeper. Have you been taught how to dig one in water?


 :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 11, 2018, 01:51:47 PM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 11, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247362 © IWM (Q 11807)



I would be careful wandering around a ruined battleground wearing the enemy's helmet, I'm sure some soldiers have itchy trigger fingers.  The dolls are creepy. Hopefully they are dolls and not a severely bandaged child from some gas or bombing.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 11, 2018, 03:29:46 PM

Sailor vs Soldier. "There's no way in hell I want to be a sitting duck"

Soldier vs Sailor. I can always dig my hole deeper. Have you been taught how to dig one in water?


 :)

Yes, I would prefer to have solid ground under me as well, though the battlefields were often full of mud and water, to the point where there were drownings.  One thing the ships had over ground soldiers was that there were no lice inside of them, at least I'm guessing there weren't any.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 12, 2018, 01:25:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 12, 1918.

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Candlesticks from the Cambrai Cathedral made up into bundles for removal by the Germans for the sake of the metal, 12 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245301 © IWM (Q 9555)

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Ruins of a church at La Gorge, destroyed in the Battle of the Lys, 12 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245291 © IWM (Q 9545)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 12, 2018, 01:46:42 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 13, 2018, 01:04:38 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 13, 1918.

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Field Marshal Douglas Haig and French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau on the steps of the building which used to be the German Headquarters (Kommandantur) in Cambrai, 13 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245297 © IWM (Q 9551)

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Soldiers of the 57th Brigade (19th Division) hearing mass in the ruined Cambrai Cathedral, 13 October 1918. The Chaplain preaching is Reverend E. Rockliffe of the Society of Jesus (SJ).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245294 © IWM (Q 9548)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 13, 2018, 01:33:45 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Jayzelady on October 13, 2018, 08:15:08 PM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Jayzelady on October 13, 2018, 08:49:14 PM





I work with DAV and American Legion who were created by veterans for veterans going on right at 100 years now. (Legion in 1919 and DAV 1920). The videos may be a bit dated but I hope you will allow me to show our love, respect, and caring for all our veterans....my heroes.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 13, 2018, 08:51:52 PM


Yes, it won't be long now. Just 29 more days and the war will be over.  (100 years ago, that is.)  One thing that astonishes me about these speed corrected videos is the sound.  Whoever puts them together does a bang up job in adding the sound.  It sounds so utterly real, even when those musical instruments are being played.  Thanks, JayzE.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: kingart on October 13, 2018, 09:11:04 PM
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: kingart on October 13, 2018, 09:27:04 PM
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 14, 2018, 02:42:07 AM
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From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, October 14, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 14, 2018, 02:44:35 AM

(The reviewer says the movie was made in 1919 but he's wrong.  It was released to theatres in November of 1918.)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Jayzelady on October 14, 2018, 08:43:52 AM


Those were the days!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 15, 2018, 12:37:06 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 15, 1918.

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German tank traps dug in a road at the ruined town of Izel-les-Equerchin, 15 October 1918. The town, part of Drocourt-Queant Line, was captured by the 8th Division on 9 October.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245313 © IWM (Q 9567)

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A quarry at Fresnoy on the 20th Division front, showing entrances to the very extensive passages excavated in the chalk by the Germans, 15 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245315 © IWM (Q 9570)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 15, 2018, 12:57:00 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland Tidings, October 15, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 15, 2018, 03:45:59 PM





I work with DAV and American Legion who were created by veterans for veterans going on right at 100 years now. (Legion in 1919 and DAV 1920). The videos may be a bit dated but I hope you will allow me to show our love, respect, and caring for all our veterans....my heroes.

Good work and "happy birthday" to them.

Interesting tidbit I learned reading a wiki on the "Bonus Army" (this will come later in the 100 Year thread, haha)

"Before World War I, the soldiers' military service bonus (adjusted for rank) was land and money; a Continental Army private received 100 acres (40 ha) and $80.00 (2017: $1,968.51) at war's end, while a major general received 1,100 acres (450 ha). In 1855, Congress increased the land-grant minimum to 160 acres (65 ha), and reduced the eligibility requirements to fourteen days of military service or one battle; moreover, the bonus also applied to veterans of any Indian war"
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 15, 2018, 03:47:15 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland Tidings, October 15, 1918.

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Some quick research yielded no results. Interesting how spelling of "airplane" still seems to be in flux. And I wonder if this was a real plane or UFO or atmospheric phenomena or what?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 16, 2018, 12:26:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 16, 1918.

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Meteorological Section of the Royal Engineers. Preparation of wind and weather reports. Royal Engineers filling balloons with gas from a gas cylinder. Montreuil, 16 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247649 © IWM (Q 12117)

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Meteorological Section of the Royal Engineers. Preparation of wind and weather reports. British soldier (one of the light infantry regiments) operating on an instrument for recording the movement of a released balloon. Note a Royal Engineer taking notes and a Scottish soldier holding a balloon. Montreuil, 16 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247651 © IWM (Q 12119)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 16, 2018, 12:45:56 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 17, 2018, 12:40:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 17, 1918.
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Tanks of the American 301st Tank Battalion going into action at St. Souplet on the morning of 17 October 1918. Note Old Glory flying from the tank.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084664 © IWM (Q 49398)

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Encirclement and liberation of Lille by the British 57th and 59th Divisions. Crowd in the Grande Place, many of whom carry Allied flags, 17 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247364 © IWM (Q 11809)
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 17, 2018, 12:55:03 AM
Rita Hayworth was born on October 17, 1918.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 18, 2018, 01:25:11 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 18, 1918.

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A Royal Artillery Holt caterpillar tractor towing a howitzer near Courtrai, 18 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205077393 © IWM (Q 3336)

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Captain Paul Daum in the cockpit of a Salmson 2 aeroplane at Terrain du Rumont near Bar-le-Duc, 18 October 1918. Captain Daum commanded the 28th French Escadrille attached to the 79th Division. The gun shown is a double Lewis gun.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205085538 © IWM (Q 61477)

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Men of the 57th Division marching through the outskirts of Lille accompanied by a young boy holding a rifle, 18 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087473 © IWM (Q 9586)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 18, 2018, 02:00:17 AM
Actor Bobby Troup was born on October 18, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Troup

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 21, 2018, 01:26:25 AM
Silent film actor Harold Lockwood died on October 19, 1918 of Spanish Influenza.   He was 31 years old.
Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Lockwood
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Harold Lockwood in circa 1910 photograph.
By unlisted - Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=830267


Canadian aviator and flying ace of the First World War, Frank Granger Quigley, died on October 20, 1918 of Spanish Influenza.  He was 24 years old.
Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Granger_Quigley
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Quigley's grave at Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Toronto, Ontario.
By Rkonigs - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=60566234


Silent film actress Myrtle Gonzalez died on October 22, 1918 of Spanish Influenza.  She was 27 years old.
Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtle_Gonzalez
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Photo of Myrtle Gonzalez.
By Hispania - http://www.amoeba.com/blog/2009/09/eric-s-blog/-silencio-the-hispanic-latino-experience-in-the-silent-era.html, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9517253



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 22, 2018, 01:04:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 22, 1918.

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Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of the 51st Division crossing the railway at Douchy-lès-Ayette by the ruins of the blown up railway bridge, 22 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247014 © IWM (Q 11413)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 22, 2018, 01:16:41 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 23, 2018, 12:56:23 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 23, 1918.

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German barbed wire defenses on the Mole at Zeebrugge, 23 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205213928 © IWM (Q 7136)

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Captured German 150mm gun of the Lubeck Battery on the mole at Zeebrugge, 23 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205213929 © IWM (Q 7137)

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SS Brussels, a Great Eastern Railway steamer plying between Harwich and the Hook of Holland, she was captured by a German destroyer in June 1916 and taken to Zeebrugge. Captain Fryatt, her commander, was executed on 27th July 1916, being found guilty of attempting to ram a German submarine. The ship was torpedoed during the raid of 23 April 1918, raised in 1919 and given back by the Belgians to the British Government.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205238981 © IWM (Q 7135)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: MaxPower on October 23, 2018, 01:18:32 PM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 18, 1918.
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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205077393 © IWM (Q 3336)
Modern Marvels did a segment on the Holt tractors on one of their shows about their WWI contribution. Interesting info from the wiki: "They were most famously used by the British, French and American armies in World War I for hauling heavy artillery: including BL 9.2-inch howitzers and the BL 8-inch howitzer. Around 2000 Holt 75s along with 698 Holt 120s and 63 Holt 60s saw military use during the war. Early designs of WW1 French and German tanks were based on Holt tractors."
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 23, 2018, 11:59:15 PM
Modern Marvels did a segment on the Holt tractors on one of their shows about their WWI contribution. Interesting info from the wiki: "They were most famously used by the British, French and American armies in World War I for hauling heavy artillery: including BL 9.2-inch howitzers and the BL 8-inch howitzer. Around 2000 Holt 75s along with 698 Holt 120s and 63 Holt 60s saw military use during the war. Early designs of WW1 French and German tanks were based on Holt tractors."

Interesting.  Thanks, Max.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 24, 2018, 12:12:28 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 24, 1918.

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A Handley Page 0/400 bomber, serial number F5349, under construction at the Ford Junction aerodrome, 24 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315063 © IWM (Q 67850)

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British, French, American and Australian soldier with a German prisoner reading President Wilson's message to the Kaiser at Corbie, 24 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205283632 © IWM (Q 49809)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 25, 2018, 12:11:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 25, 1918.

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An armored motor car destroyed by a direct hit. Arras-Cambrai Road, 25th October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236107 © IWM (Q 3576)

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British soldier checking a wreck of a tram in the ruined Grande Place at Douai, 25 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247008 © IWM (Q 11407)

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A main street in a suburb of Douai, showing damage inflicted to houses by German delay action mines. Douai was entered by the 2nd Battalion, Middlesex Regiment (8th Division) on 17 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247003 © IWM (Q 11402)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 25, 2018, 12:36:04 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 25, 2018, 04:41:27 PM

What a tragic event. Apparently most had time to contemplate their dire situation. Interestingly a little dog survived by swimming to a nearby island.  Anyone who goes on an Alaska Cruise would be familiar with the area as many use the Inland Passage at the beginning of the cruise.

"S.S. Princess Sophia
October 24, 1918
My own dear sweetheart,
I am writing this my dear girl while the boat is in grave danger. We struck a rock last night which threw many from their berths, women rushed out in their night attire, some were crying, some too weak to move, but the lifeboats were swung out in all readiness but owing to the storm would be madness to launch until there was no hope for the ship. Surrounding ships were notified by wireless and in three hours the first steamer came, but cannot get near owing to the storm raging and the reef which we are on. There are now seven ships near. When the tide went down, two-thirds of the boat was high and dry. We are expecting the lights to go out at any minute, also the fires. The boat might go to pieces, for the force of the waves are terrible, making awful noises on the side of the boat, which has quite a list to port. No one is allowed to sleep, but believe me dear Dorrie it might have been much worse. Just hear there is a big steamer coming. We struck the reef in a terrible snowstorm. There is a big buoy near marking the danger but the captain was to port instead [of] to starboard of [the] buoy. I made my will this morning, leaving everything to you, my own true love and I want you to give £100 to my dear Mother, £100 to my dear Dad, £100 to dear wee Jack, and the balance of my estate (about £300) to you, Dorrie dear. The Eagle Lodge will take care of my remains.
In danger at Sea.
Princess Sophia
24th October 1918
To whom it may concern:
Should anything happen [to] me notify, notify Eagle Lodge, Dawson. My insurance, finances, and property, I leave to my wife (who was to be) Miss Dorothy Burgess, 37 Smart St., Longsight, Manchester, England.
J. Maskell"
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 26, 2018, 12:52:43 AM
What a tragic event. Apparently most had time to contemplate their dire situation. Interestingly a little dog survived by swimming to a nearby island.  Anyone who goes on an Alaska Cruise would be familiar with the area as many use the Inland Passage at the beginning of the cruise.

"S.S. Princess Sophia
October 24, 1918
My own dear sweetheart,
I am writing this my dear girl while the boat is in grave danger. We struck a rock last night which threw many from their berths, women rushed out in their night attire, some were crying, some too weak to move, but the lifeboats were swung out in all readiness but owing to the storm would be madness to launch until there was no hope for the ship. Surrounding ships were notified by wireless and in three hours the first steamer came, but cannot get near owing to the storm raging and the reef which we are on. There are now seven ships near. When the tide went down, two-thirds of the boat was high and dry. We are expecting the lights to go out at any minute, also the fires. The boat might go to pieces, for the force of the waves are terrible, making awful noises on the side of the boat, which has quite a list to port. No one is allowed to sleep, but believe me dear Dorrie it might have been much worse. Just hear there is a big steamer coming. We struck the reef in a terrible snowstorm. There is a big buoy near marking the danger but the captain was to port instead [of] to starboard of [the] buoy. I made my will this morning, leaving everything to you, my own true love and I want you to give £100 to my dear Mother, £100 to my dear Dad, £100 to dear wee Jack, and the balance of my estate (about £300) to you, Dorrie dear. The Eagle Lodge will take care of my remains.
In danger at Sea.
Princess Sophia
24th October 1918
To whom it may concern:
Should anything happen [to] me notify, notify Eagle Lodge, Dawson. My insurance, finances, and property, I leave to my wife (who was to be) Miss Dorothy Burgess, 37 Smart St., Longsight, Manchester, England.
J. Maskell"

Wow!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 26, 2018, 01:08:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 26, 1918.

(Spanish Influenza)

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Miss Christine Stewart, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of illness contracted on duty 26 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205381245 © IWM (WWC H21-136-1)

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Miss Winifred F Furlong, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of pneumonia contracted on duty 26 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380381 © IWM (WWC H2-128-1)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 27, 2018, 01:28:20 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 27, 1918.

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Panoramic view of a footbridge over the river Piave at Maserada to Grave di Papodopoli, 27 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268144 © IWM (Q 26734)

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Panoramic view of soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders (20th Brigade, 7th Division) escorting Austro-Hungarian prisoners across a pontoon bridge over the river Piave at Salettuol, 27 October 1918. This bridge was completed on 26 October 1918 by the Royal Engineers, including the 128th Field Company with the assistance of Italian engineers.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268148 © IWM (Q 26738)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 27, 2018, 01:37:32 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee., October 27, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 29, 2018, 01:50:16 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 29, 1918.

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A 14 inch gun on railway mounting near Thierville, 29 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307587 © IWM (Q 58369)

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An American 14 inch naval gun on a railway platform firing near Thierville, 29 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205306149 © IWM (Q 56650)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 29, 2018, 02:10:54 AM
Child actress Diana Cary was born on October 29, 1918.   Still alive at 100.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Serra_Cary

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Baby Peggy
By Younghollywoodhof.com, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15315524
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on October 30, 2018, 02:24:10 PM
Child actress Diana Cary was born on October 29, 1918.   Still alive at 100.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Serra_Cary

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Baby Peggy
By Younghollywoodhof.com, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15315524
Thanks for posting, quite a story and interesting life. Apparently last of the "silent era" who is still alive. Also lots of her work were lost in a studio fire but some stuff still appears.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 31, 2018, 12:32:45 AM
Thanks for posting, quite a story and interesting life. Apparently last of the "silent era" who is still alive. Also lots of her work were lost in a studio fire but some stuff still appears.

Very welcome, Mr. a.  Glad you liked the post.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on October 31, 2018, 12:35:36 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 31, 1918.

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Florence Hogg, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza 31 October 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380533 © IWM (WWC H2-139-1)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 01, 2018, 01:37:23 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 1, 1918.

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Trench engines (with Baldwin engines in the background) of the American 19th Transportation Company at the Base Section No. 1 at St. Nazaire, 1 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028773 © IWM (Q 69533)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 01, 2018, 02:01:03 AM
A bad train accident occurred in New York on November 1, 1918.  93 (or 97) people died in the wreck.

Info:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malbone_Street_Wreck

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 01, 2018, 02:30:44 PM
From the Imperial War Museum, October 31, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380533 © IWM (WWC H2-139-1)
A better name than how our former Governor old James "Big Jim" Hogg named his daughter: Ima. Ima Hogg. (You still here that he named his other daughter URA but this is untrue.)  But she over-came her odd name and became quite prominent and beloved. Founded a lot of this, collected art, help plan the Kennedy Center, funded mental health facilities, donated art, etc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ima_Hogg
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 02, 2018, 01:13:15 AM
A better name than how our former Governor old James "Big Jim" Hogg named his daughter: Ima. Ima Hogg. (You still here that he named his other daughter URA but this is untrue.)  But she over-came her odd name and became quite prominent and beloved. Founded a lot of this, collected art, help plan the Kennedy Center, funded mental health facilities, donated art, etc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ima_Hogg

Cool.  Thanks for the info Mr. a.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 02, 2018, 01:29:02 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 2, 1918.

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British troops outside the ruined railway station at Valenciennes, 2 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323562 © IWM (Q 78802)

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Cemetery and monument commemorating German airmen and soldiers at Drama, 2 November 1918. Recognized names on graves are: Landsturmer Max Wegener, died on 21 September 1918; Pilot Johannes Hardt; Sergeant Heinrich Arens of the 8th Infantry Landwehr Regiment, died on 28 September 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323087 © IWM (Q 78327)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 03, 2018, 01:33:59 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 3, 1918.

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British artillery limbers passing through Valenciennes, 3 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323572 © IWM (Q 78812)

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British troops near the ruined railway station at Menin, 3 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323559 © IWM (Q 78799)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 03, 2018, 01:59:04 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, November 3, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 03, 2018, 01:11:34 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, November 3, 1918.

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Yum, so do I get to pick one for each course or am served everything? That would be a lot of food and I probably couldn't handle it, maybe back when in HS.

https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4471&context=mmb-vp

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 03, 2018, 02:01:39 PM
Yum, so do I get to pick one for each course or am served everything? That would be a lot of food and I probably couldn't handle it, maybe back when in HS.

https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4471&context=mmb-vp



If I were to order, I think the food would come as you mentioned, as a single course.  In my case, (turkey and cranberries) with a side of veggies (sliced tomatoes) a small bowl of the cream of chicken soup, your choice of potato (Southern Style, whatever that is) choice of dessert, (pineapple pie?) and a glass of milk to wash it all down with.  Yes, a nice big meal, but well worth the 50 cents when considering the value of money back in those days.  (Don't forget the ten cent tip.)  Nice tune.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 03, 2018, 02:05:45 PM
If I were to order, I think the food would come as you mentioned, as a single course.  In my case, (turkey and cranberries) with a side of veggies (sliced tomatoes) a small bowl of the cream of chicken soup, your choice of potato (Southern Style, whatever that is) choice of dessert, (pineapple pie?) and a glass of milk to wash it all down with.  Yes, a nice big meal, but well worth the 50 cents when considering the value of money back in those days.  (Don't forget the ten cent tip.)  Nice tune.

Popular at Thanksgiving that is coming up. Basic recipe is sweet potatoes, butter, marshmallows, and brown-sugar. Basically take what is a healthy vegetable and make unhealthy- but tasty!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 03, 2018, 05:01:07 PM
Popular at Thanksgiving that is coming up. Basic recipe is sweet potatoes, butter, marshmallows, and brown-sugar. Basically take what is a healthy vegetable and make unhealthy- but tasty!

I must have some odd gene or something, but as much as I love potatoes, I've never been able to eat sweet potatoes.  As a kid I would eat the marshmallow topping but that's as far as I would go with them.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 03, 2018, 05:05:11 PM
I must have some odd gene or something, but as much as I love potatoes, I've never been able to eat sweet potatoes.  As a kid I would eat the marshmallow topping but that's as far as I would go with them.
I will eat but like you don't particularly like. I don't have a sweet-tooth. Give me another helping of that prime rib, and mashed potatoes and gravy, and skip dessert and the sweet potatoes, especially when made more sweet "Southern Style." Likewise unsweet tea, not sweet tea, for me in summer. You aren't alone, the gene-pool is large.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 04, 2018, 01:11:05 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Washington Herald., November 04, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 04, 2018, 01:39:08 AM
Actor Art Carney was born on November 4, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Carney

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Publicity photo of Art Carney.
By News service - eBay, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20697457

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 05, 2018, 12:38:36 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 5, 1918.
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Troops of the American 337th Tank Battalion entraining at Winchester railway station, 5 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205354825 © IWM (Q 112259)

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Troop train leaving Winchester railway station carrying troops of the American 337th Tank Battalion from Winnal Down rest camp, 5 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086667 © IWM (Q 113265)
 
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 06, 2018, 01:07:35 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 6, 1918.

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An American official photographer of the US Signal Corps and his assistant carry out reconnaissance photography under cover of a deep river bank by the River Aire on the Western Front, 6 November 1918. La Forge Ferme, 3 kilometers north of Varennes-en-Argonne, Meuse. They are using a glass plate camera mounted on a tripod to photograph the German lines.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205196674 © IWM (Q 113418)

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Photograph made with the camera in the position shown in Q 113418 and shows the view commanded by the
reconnaissance position. La Forge Ferme, 3 kilometers north of Varennes-en-Argonne, Meuse, 6 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215795 © IWM (Q 113419)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 06, 2018, 01:43:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Devils Lake World and Inter-Ocean., (North Dakota) November 06, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 07, 2018, 02:15:08 AM
Some newspaper headlines from the Library of Congress, November 7, 1918.  (Only the Grand Forks Herald got it right.)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 07, 2018, 02:31:29 AM
Evangelist Billy Graham was born on November 7, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Graham
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 07, 2018, 10:05:01 AM
Evangelist Billy Graham was born on November 7, 1918.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Graham
He would've been a good interview with Art.



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 09, 2018, 12:39:51 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Seattle Star, November 9, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 10, 2018, 12:43:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 10, 1918.

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Men of the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards pass a railway carriage set on fire by the retreating Germans, near Maubeuge, 10 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235882 © IWM (Q 3338)

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Men of the 55th Division attending fires in Tournai, 10 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245407 © IWM (Q 9672)

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Men of the 55th Division and Belgian firemen extinguishing a fire in Tournai, 10 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245408 © IWM (Q 9673)

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Men of the 55th Division and Belgian firemen working the pumps to extinguish a fire in Tournai, 10 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245412 © IWM (Q 9677)

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Men of the 55th Division attending a fire in Tournai, 10 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245410 © IWM (Q 9675)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 11, 2018, 01:19:12 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 11, 1918.

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Train in which the Armistice was signed in Compiegne, 11 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308637 © IWM (Q 60954)

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Lieutenant H. F. Phillips with the gun which fired the last shot on the American front. Laneuville-sur-Meuse, 11 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215817 © IWM (Q 70746)

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Cheering crowds on the Boulevard in Paris, 11 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028768 © IWM (Q 69030)

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An American sailor, an American Red Cross Nurse and two British soldiers celebrating the signing of the Armistice near the Paris Gate at Vincennes in Paris, 11 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205027865 © IWM (Q 65857)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 11, 2018, 01:36:50 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Dancing queen on November 11, 2018, 03:12:27 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: WhiteCrow on November 11, 2018, 05:07:58 AM


And special mention to the Colonialists British Empire and all their self serving enslavement of world. Unfortunately we are still fighting many of the unsettled disputes their Empire caused before, during and after World War One. 
"The Sun Never Sets on The British Empire"

Many a brave lad gave their final measure fighting for their cause. On this day their causes Right or Wrong don't matter. This day is to honor them. For without their sacrifices we wouldn't be here.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 11, 2018, 10:03:15 AM
And today is both Remembrance Day and Remembrance Sunday, which is fitting for the 100th anniversary.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2018/nov/11/a-century-ago-world-war-i-ended-and-spokane-went-n/

"In small towns throughout the Inland Northwest, people went “frantic with joy” and staged monster celebrations on their main streets. Most main streets were completely closed to auto traffic because of the crowds. “The kaiser is hanging in effigy from many telephone poles today and is being hooted and jeered by frantic crowds,” reported one correspondent from outlying towns. In Spokane, Kaiser Wilhelm, who had just abdicated, swung in effigy from a guy wire at Howard Street and Riverside Avenue."

"A contingent from the Palace department store carried the “sad remains of Kaiser Bill and the Clown Prince” on stretchers. When a local “humorist” unveiled a sign saying, “We Got the Kaiser’s Pants,” the crowd gave him an ovation. Companies of happily mischievous “hat-removers” roamed the streets and knocked off every hat within reach (hat-removing was a fad at the time)."
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 11, 2018, 05:51:52 PM
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Here is my pair of WWI binoculars.  Not very big, only about 5 inches long.  But the glasses are nice and clear, with fair magnification.  They weren't handed down to me.  I bought them in an antique mall.  A case was included and it has U.S. Army pressed into the leather.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 11, 2018, 07:51:14 PM
And special mention to the Colonialists British Empire and all their self serving enslavement of world. Unfortunately we are still fighting many of the unsettled disputes their Empire caused before, during and after World War One. 
"The Sun Never Sets on The British Empire"

Many a brave lad gave their final measure fighting for their cause. On this day their causes Right or Wrong don't matter. This day is to honor them. For without their sacrifices we wouldn't be here.
Lest we forget also lots of "natives" of various Colonies, of various countries, but especially the British fought in the war or provided much needed logistics, digging, etc. And in the Second later. Some still do, with great aplomb, and only recently, luckily, were some able to get proper pensions and/or full UK residency and status (like the famously brave Gurkhas!)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 12, 2018, 01:10:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 12, 1918.

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The exterior of a Zeppelin shed at Maubeuge, 12 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235900 © IWM (Q 3357)

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The exterior of a Zeppelin shed at Maubeuge, 12 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235901 © IWM (Q 3358)

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The interior of a Zeppelin shed at Maubeuge, 12 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235899 © IWM (Q 3356)

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British troops inspect a mined railway bridge and wrecked train near Maubeuge, 12 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235894 © IWM (Q 3350)

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The Commanding Officer of the 9th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment stands on a lorry surrounded by his men and leads a cheer to the King, St Waast, near Bavai, 12 November 1918.
https://media.iwm.org.uk/ciim5/229/898/large_000000.jpg?_ga=2.40874914.125616992.1541494130-725590253.1518335797 © IWM (Q 3362)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pawpourri on November 12, 2018, 03:31:26 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 12, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235900 © IWM (Q 3357)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235901 © IWM (Q 3358)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235899 © IWM (Q 3356)

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235894 © IWM (Q 3350)

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  https://media.iwm.org.uk/ciim5/229/898/large_000000.jpg?_ga=2.40874914.125616992.1541494130-725590253.1518335797 © IWM (Q 3362)

The sheer massiveness of that zeppelin shed... the man looks like an ant in comparison. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: pawpourri on November 12, 2018, 03:35:50 AM
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Here is my pair of WWI binoculars.  Not very big, only about 5 inches long.  But the glasses are nice and clear, with fair magnification.  They weren't handed down to me.  I bought them in an antique mall.  A case was included and it has U.S. Army pressed into the leather.

Good for you, what a find!   :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 12, 2018, 04:08:39 AM
The sheer massiveness of that zeppelin shed... the man looks like an ant in comparison.

I thought of an ant, too!  I wish that there had still been a zeppelin in there.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 12, 2018, 04:11:37 AM
Good for you, what a find!   :)

Thank you, @pawpourri.  I wish you were my next door neighbor.  I would definitely let you look through them.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 13, 2018, 12:23:01 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 13, 1918.

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A steep hill, 150 meters high, at Mont St. Aubert, just North of Tournai commanding a wonderful view. Taken by 142nd Brigade, 47th Division on 9 November. Photograph taken on 13 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245418 © IWM (Q 9683)

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British and American officers examining a German artillery range table found in the observation station on top of Mont St. Aubert, 13 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245417 © IWM (Q 9682)

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French boys, deported by the Germans, returning from behind the Germans lines. Near Tournai, 13 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245420 © IWM (Q 9685)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 14, 2018, 12:22:32 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 14, 1918.

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Miss Rosamond Curtis, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of influenza 14 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380175 © IWM (WWC H2-125-1)

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Released British POWs enjoying their first meal in freedom after they met British troops. Ath, 14 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247040 © IWM (Q 11442)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 14, 2018, 12:34:26 PM


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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247040 © IWM (Q 11442)

Could they at least stand them a pint and decent pie instead of some more gruel? I mean war is over, you are released, you are back home: "have some gruel?"
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 14, 2018, 03:35:05 PM
Could they at least stand them a pint and decent pie instead of some more gruel? I mean war is over, you are released, you are back home: "have some gruel?"

At least some wine, as I'm pretty sure they are in France.  The town might be in partial ruins though.  It will probably take awhile for the supply lines to be brought back to normal.  Did you notice the Iron Cross with ribbon on the one soldier?  I'd like to know how he got it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on November 14, 2018, 03:54:37 PM
At least some wine, as I'm pretty sure they are in France.  The town might be in partial ruins though.  It will probably take awhile for the supply lines to be brought back to normal.  Did you notice the Iron Cross with ribbon on the one soldier?  I'd like to know how he got it.

I’m not sure what medal that is but I doubt it is an iron cross. Why would a British POW have a german medal?


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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 14, 2018, 04:13:28 PM
I’m not sure what medal that is but I doubt it is an iron cross. Why would a British POW have a german medal?

For the same reason Dad brought home a nice collection of German WWII medals from Europe.  He took them away from the losers.  Also, the guy just walked back from German captivity.  I don't think he would have been wearing that medal when he was captured.  Just some conjecture on my part, though  We'd have to ask the bloke about it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 14, 2018, 04:40:12 PM
For the same reason Dad brought home a nice collection of German WWII medals from Europe.  He took them away from the losers.  Also, the guy just walked back from German captivity.  I don't think he would have been wearing that medal when he was captured.  Just some conjecture on my part, though  We'd have to ask the bloke about it.
For some reason I cannot really zoom in. It could be he stole it or maybe it is another decoration? A lot of medals are cross-like but that one does look like the Iron Cross.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 15, 2018, 01:01:22 AM
For some reason I cannot really zoom in. It could be he stole it or maybe it is another decoration? A lot of medals are cross-like but that one does look like the Iron Cross.

Also he could have picked it up during the walk back.  The party of ex-pows might have come across some houses used by the Germans, who had to flee so quickly that they were forced to leave their possessions behind.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 15, 2018, 01:23:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 15, 1918.

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Troops of the Army Service Corps giving cigarettes to released British POWs. Near Hal, 15 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247038 © IWM (Q 11440)

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German Army unit with a white flag after their surrender. Near Brussels, 15 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205264057 © IWM (Q 23611)

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German Army horse transport column on the roadside near Brussels on its way back to Germany and released civilian prisoners returning from Germany, 15 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247130 © IWM (Q 11544)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 16, 2018, 12:46:00 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 16, 1918.

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Group of British soldiers who were prisoners at Noame in Belgium listening to a young citizen of Sedan sounding "La Victoire" on the bugle. Sedan, 16 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084665 © IWM (Q 49664)
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Japanese heavy artillery in Khabarovsk (Siberia), 16 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205309062 © IWM (Q 61663)

 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 16, 2018, 10:35:57 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 16, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084665 © IWM (Q 49664)

Tried to find a youtube of bugle playing "La Victoire" but no dice....
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 16, 2018, 11:14:11 AM
Tried to find a youtube of bugle playing "La Victoire" but no dice....

Cool that you thought of looking it up though, mr. a.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 17, 2018, 12:26:23 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 17, 1918.

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Troops of the 8th Scottish Motor Ambulance Convoy, Army Service Corps at Valenciennes, 17 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245432 © IWM (Q 9699)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 17, 2018, 09:25:01 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 17, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245432 © IWM (Q 9699)

Is that a monkey?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 17, 2018, 11:37:16 AM
Is that a monkey?

Possibly, but closeup I don't see an arm and there appears to be a thin beak.  Some kind of big bird?  IDK.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 17, 2018, 11:55:53 AM
Possibly, but closeup I don't see an arm and there appears to be a thin beak.  Some kind of big bird?  IDK.
I can't seem to really zoom in but it struck me as a monkey but who knows? Could be a big bird, I guess? Still strange. I guess a company mascot? Something rescued from a zoo or private menagerie during the war?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Dancing queen on November 17, 2018, 05:42:32 PM
It looks like a monkey to me too
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 19, 2018, 12:55:38 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 19, 1918.

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Miss Lilian Norah Pearce, Voluntary Aid Detachments. Died of pneumonia 19 November 1918. Memorial card, letter from father and death notification. Died Cannock Chase Military Hospital, aged 22. Mother died 10 days later - both of pneumonia following flu.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205381008 © IWM (WWC H2-137)

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The march past on the occasion of the State Entry into Antwerp of King Albert I and Queen Elizabeth of Belgium, 19 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239012 © IWM (Q 7174)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 19, 2018, 08:55:08 AM
Not a 100 years but interesting....

http://militaryimagesmagazine.com/2018/08/05/the-official-launch-of-civil-war-photo-sleuth/ 

https://www.civilwarphotosleuth.com/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 20, 2018, 12:41:00 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 20, 1918.

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Captured tranport wagon for a 142 mm Krupp mortar (1916 model) at Spincourt, 20 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205324176 © IWM (Q 79429)

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Cradle and spade transport wagon for a 142 mm Krupp mortar (1916 model) at Spincourt, 20 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205324175 © IWM (Q 79428)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 21, 2018, 01:28:03 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 21, 1918.

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Ships of the British Fleet preparing to meet the surrendered German ships, 21st November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205254037 © IWM (Q 19668)

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German ship of the KAISER Class.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205253727 © IWM (Q 19302)

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German submarines moored at Harwich.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205253744 © IWM (Q 19327)

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Lieutenant Blacklock, DSC., examining papers of German submarine U48 commander, Harwich.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205253736 © IWM (Q 19314)

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Arrival at Rosyth: SMS SEYDLITZ leading MOLTKE, HINDENBURG, DERFFLINGER and VON DER TANN. Surrender of the German Fleet. British airship N. S. 8 flying over the surrendered ships in line. 21st November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193783 © IWM (Q 20614)

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Arrival at Rosyth: SMS FRIEDRICH DER GROSSE (Fleet Flagship) leading two Kaiser class battleships.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193809 © IWM (Q 20615A)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 22, 2018, 01:30:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 22, 1918.

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German car, flying A white flag, leaving the former German GHQ at Spa, now the headquarters of the International Armistice Commission, 22 November 1918. Note the German sentry.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239027 © IWM (Q 7190)

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The ceremony for the state entry of Albert I, King of the Belgians, and other members of the Belgian Royal Family into Brussels, 22 November 1918. The Royal party watch a march-past of French troops.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235917 © IWM (Q 3375)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 25, 2018, 12:58:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 25, 1918.

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Image: to the left a team of Sikh sappers repair a stone bridge, replacing a missing section with a wooden structure, supervised by a British officer. To the right, a heavily loaded camel followed by two military trucks move along a track that runs down into the dry riverbed and up to the other side. Horses are grazing on the far bank and the sea is visible to the far left.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/18059 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 1577)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 25, 2018, 01:27:27 AM
From the Library of Congress.  Lietuva., (Chicago) November 25, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 27, 2018, 12:54:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 27, 1918.
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Victor Emmanuel III, the King of Italy, with General Rudolph Lambart (10th Earl of Cavan), the C-in-C of the British Army in Italy, in a car at the review of the British troops. Castelgomberto, 27 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268193 © IWM (Q 26783)

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British troops helping to get Victor Emmanuel III, the King of Italy's car out of the mud. Castelgomberto, 27 November 1918. They are probably servicemen of the 12th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry (69th Brigade, 23rd Division).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268195 © IWM (Q 26785)

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Victor Emmanuel III, the King of Italy, talking to General Rudolph Lambart (10th Earl of Cavan), the C-in-C of the British Army in Italy, at the review of the British troops, Castelgomberto, 27 November 1918. Major-General John Gathorne-Hardy can be seen talking to a French officer, probably General Paul Maistre, in the Royal Box.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268190 © IWM (Q 26780)

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Gunners of the Royal Artillery passing the saluting point at the review of the British troops by Victor Emmanuel III, the King of Italy, at Castelgomberto, 27 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268197 © IWM (Q 26787)

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Victor Emmanuel III, the King of Italy, leaving the parade ground after reviewing the British troops. Castelgomberto, 27 November 1918. General Rudolph Lambart (10th Earl of Cavan), the C-in-C of the British Army in Italy, is on the far left.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205268184 © IWM (Q 26774)
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 27, 2018, 01:48:09 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Or.) Courier, November 27, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 27, 2018, 10:46:53 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Or.) Courier, November 27, 1918.

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"Deputy Sheriff Frank Walter Twombley

 

On Tuesday, November 19, 1918 Deputy Sheriff Frank Walter Twombley was riding his police motorcycle, attempting to catch and pull over a speeding motorist. As he got alongside the car he was probably able to observe a young couple in the front seat; a young man driving with a young woman passenger. As Deputy Twombley pulled next to the speeding driver’s window, the driver produced a pistol and shot the deputy off his bike. Deputy Twombley died instantly at the corner of Union and Portland Blvd. Unknown to Deputy Twombley, his killer had just robbed the toll plaza at the Southern end of the Interstate Bridge. The killer, John Cyril Laird, was eventually arrested and convicted of 2nd Degree Murder and sentenced to life in prison. During the trial, Laird stated his true name was John Knight Giles. According to documents, Giles escaped from the Salem, Oregon prison and was free until 1935 when he was arrested along with six others for attempting to rob the Denver and Rio Grande Mail Train as it pulled out of Salt Lake City. Giles was sentenced and sent to McNeil Island and was quickly transferred to Alcatraz Prison due to the length of his sentence and his escape record. Giles is considered by some to be one of the only inmates to ever escape from Alcatraz as, in 1945, while working a laundry detail, he donned the uniform of a US Army soldier and jumped aboard a departing boat. He was questioned and arrested as he stepped off the boat at Ft McDowell.

Our thoughts and prayers will always be with the Twombley family."

http://policemotorunits.com/multnomah-county--co-sheriff-s-office.html
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 27, 2018, 01:08:42 PM
"Deputy Sheriff Frank Walter Twombley

 

On Tuesday, November 19, 1918 Deputy Sheriff Frank Walter Twombley was riding his police motorcycle, attempting to catch and pull over a speeding motorist. As he got alongside the car he was probably able to observe a young couple in the front seat; a young man driving with a young woman passenger. As Deputy Twombley pulled next to the speeding driver’s window, the driver produced a pistol and shot the deputy off his bike. Deputy Twombley died instantly at the corner of Union and Portland Blvd. Unknown to Deputy Twombley, his killer had just robbed the toll plaza at the Southern end of the Interstate Bridge. The killer, John Cyril Laird, was eventually arrested and convicted of 2nd Degree Murder and sentenced to life in prison. During the trial, Laird stated his true name was John Knight Giles. According to documents, Giles escaped from the Salem, Oregon prison and was free until 1935 when he was arrested along with six others for attempting to rob the Denver and Rio Grande Mail Train as it pulled out of Salt Lake City. Giles was sentenced and sent to McNeil Island and was quickly transferred to Alcatraz Prison due to the length of his sentence and his escape record. Giles is considered by some to be one of the only inmates to ever escape from Alcatraz as, in 1945, while working a laundry detail, he donned the uniform of a US Army soldier and jumped aboard a departing boat. He was questioned and arrested as he stepped off the boat at Ft McDowell.

Our thoughts and prayers will always be with the Twombley family."

http://policemotorunits.com/multnomah-county--co-sheriff-s-office.html

What an awesome update!  Thanks, mr. a.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 28, 2018, 01:28:00 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 28, 2018, 09:59:34 AM


Interesting footage. Quite a crowd and though comments are surprised I think everyone was happy that the war was over, even the losing side(s.)  There is a poster or advertisement featured on a pole "Der sprechende Hund," from I can tell. "The speaking dog?" Some novelty play or side-show? A bar's name? Dog training? Imdb shows nothing. But I find this but seems more modern. Also there are some dog training sites that use this phrase (how to 'speak to your dog')
 
https://www.songtexte.com/songtext/loriot/der-sprechende-hund-53b6afa5.html 
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Loriot-sprechende-Hund-Mensch-Videokassette/dp/B00004RMA3 

 

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 28, 2018, 12:59:05 PM
Interesting footage. Quite a crowd and though comments are surprised I think everyone was happy that the war was over, even the losing side(s.)  There is a poster or advertisement featured on a pole "Der sprechende Hund," from I can tell. "The speaking dog?" Some novelty play or side-show? A bar's name? Dog training? Imdb shows nothing. But I find this but seems more modern. Also there are some dog training sites that use this phrase (how to 'speak to your dog')
 
https://www.songtexte.com/songtext/loriot/der-sprechende-hund-53b6afa5.html 
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Loriot-sprechende-Hund-Mensch-Videokassette/dp/B00004RMA3 



Most interesting.  I hadn't noticed the signs.  I was too preoccupied by wondering if Adolf Hitler was among the crowd of returning soldiers.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 28, 2018, 01:54:23 PM
Most interesting.  I hadn't noticed the signs.  I was too preoccupied by wondering if Adolf Hitler was among the crowd of returning soldiers.
I'm sure exactly when he was discharged but I seem to recall he was in the hospital when he learned of Germany's surrender and the end of the War....
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 28, 2018, 02:19:56 PM
I'm sure exactly when he was discharged but I seem to recall he was in the hospital when he learned of Germany's surrender and the end of the War....

Right.  I should have looked that up.  Hitler was temporaily blinded by mustard gas on October 15, 1918 and was recuperating in a hospital when the war ended.  Ironically, he was proud of the German army's performance and thought that they would have won the war had it not been for the 'turncoats' running things back in the Fatherland.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on November 28, 2018, 03:15:49 PM
Right.  I should have looked that up.  Hitler was temporaily blinded by mustard gas on October 15, 1918 and was recuperating in a hospital when the war ended.  Ironically, he was proud of the German army's performance and thought that they would have won the war had it not been for the 'turncoats' running things back in the Fatherland.
With no foreign troops in Germany, and German soldiers still occupying large parts of France and other countries, with the Kaiser hiding out in Holland and then abdicating, Hitler’s view was widely held. In fact, it was one of his rallying points in his rise to power.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 29, 2018, 12:30:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, November 29, 1918.

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German soldiers watching the entry of the 2th Lancers into Spa, 29 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239026 © IWM (Q 7189)

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General Charles Kavanagh, the Commander of the Cavalry Corps, watching the 2nd Cavalry Brigade passing through Spa, 29 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239025 © IWM (Q 7188)

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Brigadier General Algernon Lawson leading the 2nd Cavalry Brigade into Spa, 29 November 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239024 © IWM (Q 7187)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on November 29, 2018, 01:19:32 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, November 29, 1918.

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In reference to the above death notice, this, from the May 12, 1918 Rogue River Courier:
Quote
ONE ROBBER OF BULLION IS CAPTURED

  Robert W. DeWitt, on of the robbers who held up R. Boswell and his son Robert Jr. at their placer mine near Holland May 2, has been captured and is now confined in the Josephine county jail awaiting examination. DeWitt was apprehended on Thursday at a mine about halfway between Yreka and Happy Camp, where he had stopped to retain work. From descriptions of the robbers which had been broadcast from the sheriff's office, men working at the mine suspected DeWitt and went to Yreka, 40 miles, in order to telephone to Sheriff Lewis for further details. The sheriff was positive they had the right man and gave instructions to arrest him without delay.

  Sheriff Lewis and Deputy Sheriff Lister, with Robert Boswell Jr., left Thursday night for Yreka and returned Friday night with the prisoner, who when arrested had a 30 30 automatic rifle and an automatic pistol. 

  From the story of DeWitt, who admits the crime, a story of duplicity and treachery is revealed, as  well as the details of a well planned holdup, which resulted in the theft of $6.000 in gold bullion.

  According to the story, DeWitt and his partner went to Waldo for the express purpose of robbing the Esterly mine. They camped in the hills overlooking the mine for a few days, and for a day his partner watched operations at the mine through a glass, but decided that the plan was not practical.

  DeWitt says that after a time he became worn out and also suffered from poison oak and he proposed that they make camp and rest. The partner mentioned that it was too close to the trail but that he would go over to a nearby flat and make camp, build a fire and have supper ready. He offered to carry DeWitt's blankets and his bundle in which the gold was carried. The offer was accepted and when DeWitt, who carried only the two guns, came to the camping place he found that no camp had been made. This was the last he had seen of his partner. Being broke, hungry and cold, DeWitt made for a mine and secured work, putting in one day, for which he
received board and $2.75.

  At the Yreka jail DeWitt's troubles again started when he was up before a kangaroo court composed of 15 or 30 prisoners and was fined $2.75. Then he was broke again.

  Young Boswell who picked out DeWitt from a group of miners as the man who had robbed the mine, paid to Sheriff Charles H. Howard, of Siskiyou county, the $250.00 reward, which will be paid over to I. F. McCoy and John R. Johnston, the deputy sheriff and the miner who arrested DeWitt.

  Sheriff Lewis is certain that they will be able to apprehend DeWitt's partner and has hope of securing the greater part of the bullion
.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on November 29, 2018, 10:43:08 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Rogue River Courier, November 29, 1918.

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In reference to the above death notice, this, from the May 12, 1918 Rogue River Courier:
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Glad they caught 'em!!

Contrary to my thoughts, and I think discussed earlier in this case, there was actually a semi-auto rifle chambered in .30-.30 but it was very rare and apparently not very reliable. And although the nramuseum says it was that is, basically, the only source I can find easily on it. Most say .30Rem. I still think they likely had the MUCH more common (even now) lever action .30-.30.

http://www.nramuseum.org/the-museum/the-galleries/firearms-traditions-for-today/case-80-hunting-big-and-small-game/standard-arms-model-g-autoloader-rifle.aspx
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 01, 2018, 01:10:06 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 1, 1918.

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Evelyn Mackintosh, Women's Royal Naval Service. Died of influenza 01 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205380769 © IWM (WWC N3-2)

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The interior of the control room onboard a German U-boat, with a Royal Navy sailor standing to the left, with the binnacle in the center foreground.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/23511 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 1498)

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A group of naval men standing by a stove or sitting in armchairs, relaxing, drinking and smoking. The most finished portraits are the three men standing, and one sitting in the foreground.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/7616 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 1120)

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Bow view of two warships anchored alongside each other at the dockside; to the right a small sailing boat and a distant view of another warship.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/15302 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2690)

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View from a high forward point on a warship, (HMS Concord) of a long line of men (ex-POWs) boarding the ship from the dockside; sailors on the deck wave their caps and greet the men on board. To the right the image is dominated by the funnel of the ship.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/15303 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2691)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 01, 2018, 01:34:05 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee., December 01, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 02, 2018, 01:07:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 2, 1918.

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King George V passing down a village street lined by cheering troops of the 21st Division. Photograph was taken near to Le Quesnoy, on 2 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245484 © IWM (Q 9756)

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Children present flowers to King George V at Le Quesnoy on the 2 December 1918. The road is lined by cheering troops of the 21st Division.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245483 © IWM (Q 9755)

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King George V inspecting the graves of men of the American II Corps which took part in the operations of the Fourth Army in the St. Quentin Canal Area. Photograph taken on 2 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245470 © IWM (Q 9741)

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King George V pauses at the grave of three men of the Tank Corps during his visit to the Fourth Army battleground of St. Quentin Canal, 2 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245466 © IWM (Q 9737)

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King George V at Riqueval Bridge, the scene of the exploits of the 137th Brigade (46th Division) in crossing the St. Quentin Canal on 29th September 1918. Photograph taken on 2 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245468 © IWM (Q 9739)

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King George V and his party crossing Riqueval Bridge which Captain Arthur Humphrey Charlton of the North Staffordshire Regiment, 1/6th Battalion, had preserved from destruction on 29 September 1918. Photograph taken on 2 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205216622 © IWM (Q 9743)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 02, 2018, 01:37:10 AM
Recorded on December 2, 1918.


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Marie Tiffaney in 1919. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Tiffany 
By Bain - Library of Congress, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57802741
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 03, 2018, 01:00:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 3, 1918.

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Grain being sucked out of barges which have brought it across the chanel to the grain discharging works at Calais, which was manned by members of the Chinese Labour Corps. 3 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236011 © IWM (Q 3474)

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Members of the Chinese Labour Corps placing filled sacks on to the rollers which moved grain around the grain discharging works, Calais, 3rd December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236015 © IWM (Q 3478)

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The machinery at the grain discharging works, Calais, manned by members of the Chinese Labour Corps, seen on 3rd December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236014 © IWM (Q 3477)

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Chinese Labour Corps discharging grain at a Grain Discharging Works, Calais, 3rd December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236018 © IWM (Q 3481)

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Chinese Labour Corps stacking sacks of grain brought to them by rollers at a Grain Discharging Works, Calais, 3rd December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236020 © IWM (Q 3483)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 04, 2018, 12:58:39 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 4, 1918.
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Belgian coastal defenses at Ostend (Oldenburgh and Palace Hotel Batteries), 4 December 1918. A heavy gun camouflaged in a decoy thatched cottage house.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205351483 © IWM (Q 108704)

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Quote
Belgian coastal defenses at Ostend (Oldenburgh and Palace Hotel Batteries), 4 December 1918. A heavy gun camouflaged in a decoy thatched cottage house.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205351482 © IWM (Q 108700)

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Pipes and Drummers of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, 2nd Battalion. Photograph taken at Le Contay on the 4 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245480 © IWM (Q 9752)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 05, 2018, 12:58:04 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Gazette Times, December 5, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 06, 2018, 01:36:39 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 6, 1918.

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Quote
British armored car passing by a tram-car with women conductors at Cologne, 6 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239044 © IWM (Q 7207)

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Quote
Machine gun subsection attached to D Squadron, 18th Hussars for duty at the harbor in Cologne. Armed civilians, usually German ex-soldiers, who were policing the town, are standing nearby. 6 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239045 © IWM (Q 7208)

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Machine gun subsection of the 18th Hussars guarding the road bridge just north of Bayenthal, Cologne. 6 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239039 © IWM (Q 7202)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 06, 2018, 01:43:05 AM
There was a 7.2 earthquake on Vancouver Island, British Columbia on this date back in 1918. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_Vancouver_Island_earthquake
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 06, 2018, 02:03:30 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Free Trader-Journal, December 6, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 07, 2018, 01:36:31 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 7, 1918.

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The pilot car, bearing III Corp's sign preceding the Royal Car into Tournai, 7th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235983 © IWM (Q 3446)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King with the Prince of Wales, the Duke of York and General Sir William Birdwood, the last General Officer Commanding British Fifth Army prior to its disbandment, visit 15th Division at a cross-roads west of Thumaide, Belgium. The Division is formed up either side of a broad road, the men being only twenty deep and leaving only a narrow passage in the middle of the road for the King.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235982 © IWM (Q 3445)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King with the Prince of Wales, the Duke of York and General Sir William Birdwood, the last General Officer Commanding British Fifth Army prior to its disbandment, visit 15th Division at a cross-roads west of Thumaide, Belgium.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235985 © IWM (Q 3448)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King and the Prince of Wales with Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Keyes viewing the scene of the British naval operations against Zeebrugge, 9th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/20538 © IWM (Q 3453)




 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 08, 2018, 12:20:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 8, 1918.

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. British Army Officers being presented to the King in the ruins of Ypres, 8th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235957 © IWM (Q 3420)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King visiting the ruins of the Cloth Hall in Ypres, 8th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235958 © IWM (Q 3421)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King and General William Birdwood pay homage at the temporary grave of Brigadier General Francis Aylmer Maxwell VC, CSI, DSO & Bar who died in Ypres in September 1917.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235967 © IWM (Q 3430)

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King George V's visit to France and Belgium, 30th November to 10th December 1918. The King paying homage at the temporary grave of Prince Maurice of Battenburg who died in Ypres in October 1914.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235964 © IWM (Q 3427)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 09, 2018, 12:31:49 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 9, 1918.
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King George V talking with two female ambulance drivers of the Belgian Convoy, the first women to land on the Mole at Zeebrugge, 9th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235955 © IWM (Q 3418)

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King George V, with King Albert I of the Belgians and Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Keyes, on the Mole at Zeebrugge, 9th December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205235954 © IWM (Q 3417)

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King George V, with King Albert I of the Belgians and Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Keyes, using a goods truck as a table during an open-air lunch near the Mole at Zeebrugge, 9th December 1918. #1
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205381696 © IWM (Q 3417)

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King George V, with King Albert I of the Belgians and Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Keyes, using a goods truck as a table during an open-air lunch near the Mole at Zeebrugge, 9th December 1918. #2
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205381695 © IWM (Q 3417)


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 12, 2018, 12:17:17 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 12, 1918.
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Quote
Dazzle-camouflaged American transport ship USS Sixaola leaving Bordeaux, 12 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307526 © IWM (Q 58282)
Info on the Sixaola:  http://shipscribe.com/usnaux/ww1/ships/id2777.htm
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on December 12, 2018, 12:03:48 PM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 12, 1918.
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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307526 © IWM (Q 58282)
Info on the Sixaola:  http://shipscribe.com/usnaux/ww1/ships/id2777.htm

Some "dazzle" had colors, not just b&w, though those were the most common.  The jury is still out as to whether it was effective. Some reports says yes, others thought it was a gimmick.

https://www.warhistoryonline.com/world-war-i/how-hide-a-ship-confuse-enemy.html

Personally I like it and curious it would be legal to 'wrap' my truck in that as a test and see if it would cause more accidents, less accidents, less/more tickets, etc. And would it even be legal? Since it is so jarring and confusing....
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 13, 2018, 12:23:02 AM
Some "dazzle" had colors, not just b&w, though those were the most common.  The jury is still out as to whether it was effective. Some reports says yes, others thought it was a gimmick.

https://www.warhistoryonline.com/world-war-i/how-hide-a-ship-confuse-enemy.html

Personally I like it and curious it would be legal to 'wrap' my truck in that as a test and see if it would cause more accidents, less accidents, less/more tickets, etc. And would it even be legal? Since it is so jarring and confusing....

Somebody might rear end you at a stop sign because they thought they had more space to stop? haha.  I wonder if those soldiers made it home before Christmas?  I forgot how long it took those ships to make it to New York.  Was it twelve days or over two weeks?  I can't remember.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 13, 2018, 12:34:03 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 13, 1918.

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Quote
In the foreground stands some of the damaged machinery of a liquorice factory in a largely flat, arid landscape at Kut.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/22723 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2357)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 13, 2018, 01:11:45 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Bismarck Tribune., December 13, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 13, 2018, 01:23:47 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 14, 2018, 12:42:33 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Bisbee Daily Review., December 14, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 15, 2018, 12:54:15 AM
Actor Jeff Chandler was born 100 years ago today.

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Chandler

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Jeff Chandler at Capernaum during a visit to Israel in 1959.
By Moshe Pridan - Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8962280
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on December 15, 2018, 10:16:42 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 13, 1918.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/22723 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2357)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kut

I wonder what kind of licorice they made with that guillotine-looking apparatus? Anise-style licorice, maybe?

https://norfolkinworldwar1.org/tag/siege-of-kut/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 16, 2018, 01:27:20 AM
The Hotel Cleveland (now called the Renaissance Cleveland Hotel) opened its doors on December 16, 1918.

History of the Hotel Cleveland: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_Cleveland_Hotel

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Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, right, connected to Terminal Tower.
By Chris Gent - Flickr: Downtown Cleveland Ohio (25), CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19089762
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 17, 2018, 01:03:21 AM
From the Missouri State Archives.

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Rufus, John. Inmate #21235 (MSA)
Mug shot taken on December 17, 1918.
Quote
Description: Tried and convicted of 2nd Degree Murder, sentenced to Thirty-five years from 12/9/1918. Trial held in Buchanan County. Application for discharge under 7/12 time rejected by parole board 3/1/1939. Discharged 12/11/1940 under merit time.
 
Coverage: United States – Missouri – Cole – Jefferson City
 
Date: 12/17/1918
 
Rights: Copyright is in the public domain.
 
Credit: Courtesy of Missouri State Archives
 
Image Number: RG213_02_21235
 
Institution: Missouri State Archives
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 18, 2018, 12:50:19 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 18, 1918.

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Troopship USS Princess Matoika with 3000 troops aboard returning to America, in the locks at St. Nazaire, 18 December 1918.

History of the USS Princess Matoika: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Princess_Matoika

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USS Princess Matoika under way in 1919.
By U.S. Navy - U.S. Naval Historical Center Photo #: NH 43123, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3961976

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 19, 2018, 01:52:39 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 19, 1918.

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H.M. The King with British Army commanders at Buckingham Palace.  Left to Right: Sir William Birdwood, Sir Henry Rawlinson, Sir Hubert Plumer, H.M. The King, Sir Douglas Haig, Sir Henry Horne, Sir Julian Byng.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205027095 © IWM (Q 56530)

Biography of King George V: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_V
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 21, 2018, 12:43:53 AM
American amateur athlete (ice hockey) Hobey Baker died in France on December 21, 1918.

Biography of Hobey Baker: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hobey_Baker

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Baker as a fighter pilot in World War I. 
By Unknown - Salvini, Emil R. (2005), Hobey Baker: American Legend, St. Paul, Minnesota: Hobey Baker Memorial Foundation, ISBN 978-0-976-34530-5, page 103, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11926676
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 22, 2018, 01:34:56 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 23, 2018, 01:02:22 AM
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American transport ship USS Pocahontas leaving Basseus Dock in Bordeaux, 23 December 1918.
History of the Pocahontas: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Pocahontas_(ID-3044)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 23, 2018, 01:35:14 AM
Flamenco dancer José Greco was born on December 23, 1918. 


 
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 24, 2018, 05:56:58 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The East Oregonian, December 24, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 26, 2018, 02:08:02 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 26, 1918.

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King George V and President Woodrow Wilson reviewing the Military Guard of Honor at Buckingham Palace, 26 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028839 © IWM (Q 85380)

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Mayor and Corporation of Dover receiving President Woodrow Wilson, 26 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205218803 © IWM (Q 58364)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 28, 2018, 01:10:40 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Perth Amboy Evening News., December 28, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 29, 2018, 12:30:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 29, 1918.

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President Woodrow Wilson, accopanied by Lord Mayor of Manchester, in Manchester during an official visit, 29 December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087902 © IWM (Q 58362)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 29, 2018, 01:02:05 AM
From the Library of Congress.   The Omaha Daily Bee., December 29, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 30, 2018, 01:17:00 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grand Forks Herald., December 30, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 31, 2018, 12:35:36 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, December 31, 1918.

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'Sandbag the Sailor' a pantomime performed by officers of the 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company in Imst, Austria, 31st December 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205267747 © IWM (Q 26328)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on December 31, 2018, 01:30:39 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Star. December 31, 1918.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 02, 2019, 01:33:36 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 2, 1919.

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American battleship USS Rhode Island in Brest, 2 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028845 © IWM (Q 92051)
History of the USS Rhode Island: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Rhode_Island_%28BB-17%29
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 04, 2019, 01:37:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 4, 1919.

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Aerial view of American patrol ship USS Flying Fox, 4 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307503 © IWM (Q 58258)

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American transport ship USS General Goethals at Bordeaux, 4 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028806 © IWM (Q 70656)
 


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 04, 2019, 02:22:24 AM
From the Library of Congress, January 4, 1919.

The Grants Pass (Oregon)Daily Courier.
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The Grand Forks (North Dakota) Herald.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 05, 2019, 01:49:40 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 5, 1919.
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Dazzle-camouflaged American troopship USS DeKalb (ex-SS Prinz Eitel Friedrich) in Brest, 5 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307502 © IWM (Q 58257)
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 06, 2019, 01:48:05 AM
From the Library of Congress, January 6, 1919.

A headline from the Seattle Star.
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The Evening Star.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 07, 2019, 01:44:16 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 7, 1919.

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British troopship SS Lapland in the Brest Harbour, 7 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307511 © IWM (Q 58267)
History of the SS Lapland: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Lapland
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 07, 2019, 01:52:38 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grand Forks Herald., January 07, 1919.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 08, 2019, 12:25:09 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 8, 1919.

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A sentry of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards overlooking the Rhine, Cologne, 8th January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236037 © IWM (Q 3500)

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The 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards on a route march in Cologne, 8th January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236031 © IWM (Q 3494)

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A crowd outside the Cathedral watching the Guards on a route march, on the occasion of the arrival of the Guards Colours, Cologne, 8th January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236034 © IWM (Q 3497)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 08, 2019, 01:35:18 AM
January 8, 1919.  (No sound.)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 09, 2019, 12:29:17 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 9, 1919.

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French troopship Rochambeau used to carry troops back to the United States at Bordeaux, 9 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165371 © IWM (Q 83034)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 10, 2019, 02:09:12 AM
From the National Museum of the U.S. Navy.

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Lot-8311-3 WWI American Expeditionary Forces U.S. Army. View from the bridge of USS Manchuria (ID #1633) looking down on deck, showing men on board waving “Goodbye” to people on docks as whistle blows departing warning. These men are from many different organizations, St. Nazaire, France, January 10, 1919. U.S. Army Signal Corps Photograph. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. (20170224).
Public domain.  https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 11, 2019, 01:46:45 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Courier, January 11, 1919.

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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/54176835/marvin-w_-mcbride

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 12, 2019, 02:14:29 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on January 12, 2019, 10:08:08 PM


Nice find!

Drain that swamp!



 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 12, 2019, 10:51:13 PM
Nice find!

Drain that swamp!



 ;D

Haha, Do tell!  If I knew how to skin-dive I'd look that pond up.  I'm surprised that nobody has looked for it yet.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 13, 2019, 12:45:40 AM
From the Library of Congress.   The Grants Pass Daily Courier., January 13, 1919. 

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on January 13, 2019, 07:07:37 AM
From what I have read, I am very glad I did not have to try and live through the Spanish Flu period. I don't think I would have lasted very long.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 15, 2019, 01:40:46 PM
From what I have read, I am very glad I did not have to try and live through the Spanish Flu period. I don't think I would have lasted very long.

You and me both.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 15, 2019, 01:41:47 PM
From the Imperial War Museum.  January 15, 1919.

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Ruins of the Church of St. Leger, Lens. Photograph taken on 15 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245670 © IWM (Q 9955)

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The ruins of Lens seen from the church, 15 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245674 © IWM (Q 9959)

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Ruins of the north end of Lens, 15 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245677 © IWM (Q 9962)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 16, 2019, 12:17:36 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 17, 2019, 12:59:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 17, 1919.

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USS Frederick in the Brest, France, harbor, 17 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205082965 © IWM (Q 23357)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 18, 2019, 01:23:19 AM
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 19, 2019, 12:46:06 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tombstone Epitaph., January 19, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on January 22, 2019, 12:32:58 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 17, 1919.

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https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205082965 © IWM (Q 23357)


More info on this ship. At one time it held the name "Maryland"...


https://www.revolvy.com/page/USS-Maryland-%28ACR%252D8%29 (https://www.revolvy.com/page/USS-Maryland-%28ACR%252D8%29)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 22, 2019, 01:21:39 AM

More info on this ship. At one time it held the name "Maryland"...


https://www.revolvy.com/page/USS-Maryland-%28ACR%252D8%29 (https://www.revolvy.com/page/USS-Maryland-%28ACR%252D8%29)

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Thanks.  I was looking all over for some info on the ship.  I hadn't realized that its name had been changed!  haha
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 22, 2019, 01:29:06 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 22, 1919.

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The Arabian Commission to the Peace Conference at Versailles and its advisors. Emir Feisal with, from left to right, Mohammed Rustum Bey Haidar of Baalbek, Brigadier General Nuri Pasha Said, Captain Pisani, T. E. Lawrence and Captain Hassan Bey Kadri, 22 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205125329 © IWM (Q 55581)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 23, 2019, 12:41:42 AM
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British troopship RMS Adriatic in Brest, France, 23 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205027866 © IWM (Q 65862)
History of the RMS Adriatic:  http://www.whitestarhistory.com/adriatic
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 24, 2019, 12:43:03 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 24, 1919.
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Dazzled-camouflaged American battleship USS North Carolina with troops. Brest, 24 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307518 © IWM (Q 58274)
History of the USS North Carolina: https://historycentral.com/navy/cruiser/NC.html
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 25, 2019, 01:14:52 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 25, 1919.

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Observers being instructed in the mechanism of aerial cameras at the Valdahon aerodrome, 25 January 1919. Second Lieutenant C. S. Underwood FA (Instructor) showing First Lieutenant J. B. Harvey FA (Observer) the final working of the aerial camera before his flight.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205086680 © IWM (Q 113531)

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A Sopwith 1/2 Strutter biplane, 130 Clerget engine, at Valdahon, 25 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205084601 © IWM (Q 48896)

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Close-up of a pilot and observer in a Sopwith 1½ Strutter biplane, 25 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165363 © IWM (Q 72611)

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An American courier receiving photographic plates from the observer of a Sopwith 1½ Strutter at Valdahon, 25 January 1919. Courier: Corporal Roland McFall of the Signal Corps, US Air Service. Observer: First Lieutenant J. B. Harvey, Field Artillery.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205039606 © IWM (Q 69046)

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Dispatch rider speeding away with photographic plates from a Sopwith 1½ Strutter biplane on snow covered field at Valdahon, 25 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028772 © IWM (Q 69461)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 27, 2019, 01:56:46 AM
Ross Bagdasarian was born on January 27, 1919.  Who was Ross Bagdasarian, you might ask?  Well, if you are old enough, you probably do know who he was.  His recording name was David Seville and he supplied the human voice to all those Alvin and the Chipmunk songs.  Fans of Alfred Hitchcock's movie 'Rear Window' can also see Ross as a person in one of the windows.  He was the guy that was working on a song and playing the piano.

Biography of Ross Bagdasarian: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0046564/

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Ross Bagdasarian, Sr.
http://www.nndb.com/people/374/000062188/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26050625

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 28, 2019, 12:29:30 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass (Oregon) Daily Courier., January 28, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 29, 2019, 12:11:02 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 29, 1919.

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American transport ship SS Metapan in Brest, France, 29 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028816 © IWM (Q 72881)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 29, 2019, 12:29:57 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., January 29, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 30, 2019, 01:22:49 AM
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A cool illustration from an advertisement on page 522 of the "Canadian Machinery and Metalworking" magazine.  (January-June 1919 issue.)
https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 31, 2019, 01:10:12 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, January 31, 1919.

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Colonel C. Deems with a 75mm Split trail gun at Valdahon, France, 31 January 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028819 © IWM (Q 79422)
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/18542987/clarence-deems
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on January 31, 2019, 01:23:19 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., January 31, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 01, 2019, 01:33:23 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier, February 1, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on February 01, 2019, 11:12:45 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier, February 1, 1919.

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I'm thinking the Judge just didn't want to deal with of the lawsuit people and had them offed by some "friends of the court"


 ;D

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 02, 2019, 01:22:13 AM

I'm thinking the Judge just didn't want to deal with of the lawsuit people and had them offed by some "friends of the court"


 ;D

Ha, yes.  They must have come from quite a remote place to have dodged the flu.  Even isolated Eskimo settlements in the Arctic were wiped out during the pandemic.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 02, 2019, 01:28:39 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 2, 1919.

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German civilians waiting to be searched for firearms by Belgian soldiers before being allowed to pass over the Ober-Kassel-Dusseldorf bridge, 2 February 1919. (Bridge over the River Rhine from Ober-Kassel in the Belgian bridgehead to Dusseldorf in the neutral zone. Owing to the Spartacist rising in the latter, the Belgians permitted no one to pass.)
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239245 © IWM (Q 7425)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 02, 2019, 02:03:58 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Star, February 02, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 03, 2019, 02:14:18 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 03, 1919.

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https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Forty_Years_On_The_Pacific/Tahiti
Quote
When Darling had lived his lonely life for more than a year, he took a wife, a comely young native girl. After four years of this life came the test of Darling's convictions. An uncle of his died and willed him a fortune of $500,000 under the conditions that he leave his island-wife, return to his native land, and live like a normal being. But Darling smiled a superior smile at the suggestion.
"Why," he explained, "what do I want with money?" "What could money procure me better than what I've got—happiness, health and peace of mind, from the knowledge of leading the life that I know God intended man to live?"
His inheritance went elsewhere. But the philosopher did not regret his decision. He was still happy as ever on the top of his mountain on the lovely tropical island, until influenza killed him, December 18, 1918. To the end the natives worshiped him, and the Frenchmen debated over him at their afternoon absinthe on the veranda of the Club des Etrangers in Papeete.

Photo of Ernest Darling by Jack London: http://www.craigcarlson.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Ernest-Darling-770x1024.jpg
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on February 04, 2019, 10:09:04 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 03, 1919.

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https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Forty_Years_On_The_Pacific/Tahiti
Photo of Ernest Darling by Jack London: http://www.craigcarlson.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Ernest-Darling-770x1024.jpg


Your Honor,

After viewing the evidence, we find the defendant, Ernest Darling, Not Guilty by reason of insanity.


 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 05, 2019, 01:36:07 AM

Your Honor,

After viewing the evidence, we find the defendant, Ernest Darling, Not Guilty by reason of insanity.


 ;D

Haha.  Thank God that they found the fig leaf to be incompetent, irrelevant and immaterial.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 05, 2019, 01:49:45 AM
Actor Red Buttons was born on February 5, 1919.

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Buttons

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Photo of Red Buttons from the television program The Double Life of Henry Phyfe.
By ABC Television - eBay item photo front photo back, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17197053
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on February 06, 2019, 04:46:16 AM
Actor Red Buttons was born on February 5, 1919.

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Buttons

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Photo of Red Buttons from the television program The Double Life of Henry Phyfe.
By ABC Television - eBay item photo front photo back, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17197053


I remember when I was a young lad that talking over the phone was something special. Almost magical. Now days I turn my cell phone off and leave it that way for days on end.


Do you remember the last time you wrote a letter? I do. It was years ago to a friend overseas. Nowadays we skype each other and make sure the video is on.


Hmm....now, if we only had those transporters.....


 :)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 07, 2019, 02:05:00 AM
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Image from page 395 of "Canadian Grocer January-March 1919."
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 08, 2019, 12:48:08 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 8, 1919.
 
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Motor Launch patrol boat (ML542) of the Royal Navy on the River Rhine at Cologne, 8 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239173 © IWM (Q 7353)

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Motor Launch patrol boat (ML542) of the Royal Navy on the River Rhine at Cologne, 8 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239174 © IWM (Q 7354)

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Motor Launch patrol boat (ML542) of the Royal Navy on the River Rhine at Cologne, 8 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239178 © IWM (Q 7358)

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Motor Launch patrol boat (ML542) of the Royal Navy on the River Rhine at Cologne, 8 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239180 © IWM (Q 7360)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 08, 2019, 01:08:43 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 08, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 08, 2019, 01:24:56 AM
From the Literary Digest, February 8, 1919.

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Quote
Dividends from Daylight and fresh air cost nothing, but pay big dividends in increased output and better products. These free aids to efficiency are provided in ample measure by Truscon Steel Windows. Moreover, they afford thorough protection against fire and the elements. Truscon Steel Windows represent the highest quality in design, construction, workmanship and hardware. They are characterized by their trim, clean-cut lines and flat surfaces, adding to the attractive appearance of the building. Because of standardized construction and quantity production, their cost is exceedingly moderate. When Truscon Steel Windows are specified, there will be no delay or waiting for windows, as thirty different types and sixty sizes are carried in stock ready for immediate shipment. These stock units meet practically all requirements as regards size of window openings and ventilation. Copy of our handsome Truscon Steel Window Book mailed free on request. TRUSCON STEEL COMPANY YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO.
https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 10, 2019, 12:56:54 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 10, 1919.

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Guards ice-hockey march at Cologne, Germany, 10 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236122 © IWM (Q 3592)

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Guards ice-hockey march at Cologne, Germany, 10 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236121 © IWM (Q 3591)

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Skating at Cologne, Germany, 10 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236126© IWM (Q 3596)

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Skating at Cologne, Germany, 10 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236123 © IWM (Q 3593)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 10, 2019, 01:20:09 AM
An advertisement from Florists' Review, February, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: GravitySucks on February 10, 2019, 01:36:27 AM
An advertisement from Florists' Review, February, 1919.

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It’s not there anymore. Google street view shows it at the corner of Madison and Wabash. The “el” train tracks run above Wabash street. Not too far from Millennium Park in downtown Chicago. I’m guessing there weren’t as many suburbs to deliver to back in 1919.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 11, 2019, 12:35:34 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 11, 1919.

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The remains of a burnt-out Gotha left behind by the Germans at their abandoned aerodrome at Cologne, Germany, 11 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239187 © IWM (Q 7367)

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The remains of a burnt-out Gotha left behind by the Germans at their abandoned aerodrome at Cologne, Germany, 11 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239186 © IWM (Q 7366)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 11, 2019, 01:27:41 AM
Actress Eva Gabor (of Green Acres fame) was born on February 11, 1919.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eva_Gabor
Quote
Gabor is interred in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery and is buried just yards from both her niece, Francesca Hilton, and her friend and former co-star Eddie Albert.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 12, 2019, 01:09:28 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 12, 1919.

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Telefunken Wireless Station at Cologne, Germany, 12 February 1919. The 20 Kilowatt Telefunken transmitting switchboard for long range communication.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236133 © IWM (Q 3603)

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British soldiers working in the generating station for supplying power for the 20 Kilowatt wireless set, used for communication with Constantenople, 12 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236134 © IWM (Q 3604)

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Telefunken Wireless Station at Cologne, Germany, 12 February 1919. British electrician changing the serial on Poulsen arc wireless installation.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236135 © IWM (Q 3605)

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Telefunken Wireless Station at Cologne, Germany, 12 February 1919. British operator working German instrument.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236136 © IWM (Q 3606)

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Telefunken Wireless Station at Cologne, Germany, 12 February 1919. British operators at work.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236137 © IWM (Q 3607)



Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 12, 2019, 01:34:12 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 12, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 13, 2019, 12:37:35 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 13, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 13, 2019, 01:12:50 AM
American recording artist and television host Tennessee Ernie Ford was born on February 13, 1919.

Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Ernie_Ford

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 14, 2019, 02:12:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 14, 1919.

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Under the railway arch at Cologne, Germany, 14 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236143 © IWM (Q 3613)

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Ice floating down the Rhine at Cologne, 14 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236142 © IWM (Q 3612)

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At the British ration dump at Cologne, 14 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236145 © IWM (Q 3615)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 15, 2019, 12:56:25 AM
Some random illustrations from The Electric Railway Journal, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 16, 2019, 12:12:16 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 16, 1919.
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American battleship USS New Mexico at Brest, Germany, 16 February 1919.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_New_Mexico_%28BB-40%29
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on February 16, 2019, 06:06:09 AM
Was the WWI generation actually the greatest? They endured both world wars, the flu, and prohibition.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 18, 2019, 01:07:33 AM
Was the WWI generation actually the greatest? They endured both world wars, the flu, and prohibition.

Probably not the greatest, but I liked them.  My three great uncles were all farm boys and they were more than happy to take up arms over there in that 'Gay Parie' place.  Sure beat bucking hay in the 100 degree heat of a summer day.  They were a decent generation though.  After all, they weren't the ones that handed us the Vietnam War.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 18, 2019, 01:25:35 AM
American actor and singer Jack Palance was born on February 18, 1919.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Palance

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on February 18, 2019, 06:54:23 AM
An advertisement from Florists' Review, February, 1919.

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You could still Telegraph in 1919. Lets us know just how far removed from that generation that we are today.  Soon. everyone of us oldies will need to explain "turning" down the volume and "dialing" a phone.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 18, 2019, 01:53:16 PM

You could still Telegraph in 1919. Lets us know just how far removed from that generation that we are today.  Soon. everyone of us oldies will need to explain "turning" down the volume and "dialing" a phone.

Plus understanding a Roman numeral date and cursive style of writing, which is no longer taught in primary schools.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 18, 2019, 04:10:51 PM
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Sorry, I couldn't resist.  (Notice I screwed up the letter u in taught.  Looks more like a w.)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 20, 2019, 01:19:14 AM
Some ads from the Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News magazine, 1919.

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There will be a test later on.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on February 20, 2019, 06:13:41 AM
A test? Did you say test? You're not the boss of me.


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 Your test!!



P.S. Couldn't resist.

:P
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 20, 2019, 01:22:24 PM
A test? Did you say test? You're not the boss of me.


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 Your test!!



P.S. Couldn't resist.



:P


Haha!  Frankly, I'd probably flunk the test myself.  Though I do have the cone head screws memorized.  Looks like they still make them.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: albrecht on February 20, 2019, 01:37:24 PM
Some ads from the Canadian Machinery and Manufacturing News magazine, 1919.

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Uranium? Hmmm. Not sure about that. I hope that steel machine was used to build the old brewery in Latrobe because I've drank a lot of Rolling Rock back in the day!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 21, 2019, 01:06:08 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 21, 1919.

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Nurses of No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) on the Rhine embankment near the Hohenzollern Bridge near Cologne, 21 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239200 © IWM (Q 7380)

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Nurses of No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) pay a visit to the Rhine Naval Patrol at Cologne, 21 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239201 © IWM (Q 7381)

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Nurses of No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS) pay a visit to the Rhine Naval Patrol at Cologne, 21 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239205 © IWM (Q 7385)

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Sailors explaining the working of their gun to some nurses of No. 36 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS), who paid a visit to the Rhine Naval Patrol at Cologne, 21 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239198 © IWM (Q 7378)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 21, 2019, 01:28:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Evening Herald., (Klamath Falls, Oregon) February 21, 1919.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 22, 2019, 12:09:32 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 22, 1919.

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Dazzle-camouflaged transport ship HMS Aquitania at Port of Commerce at Brest, 22 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028799 © IWM (Q 70323)
History of RMS Aquitania: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Aquitania
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 23, 2019, 01:35:21 AM


History of SM U-118 German U-boat: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-118
Quote
The ending of hostilities on 11 November 1918 led to the subsequent surrender of the Imperial German Navy. The SM U-118 was transferred to France on 23 February 1919.
Quote
U-118 was to be broken up for scrap. In the early hours of 15 April 1919, however, while she was being towed through the English Channel towards Scapa Flow, the dragging hawser broke off in a storm. The submarine ran aground on the beach at Hastings in Sussex at approximately 00:45, directly in front of the Queens Hotel.


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 24, 2019, 01:34:04 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., February 24, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 26, 2019, 01:22:27 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, February 26, 1919.

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Wheel less German ammunition limbers left behind in Cologne, Germany, 26 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239225 © IWM (Q 7405)

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Wheel less ammunition limbers left behind at Cologne by the Germans, 26th February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239223 © IWM (Q 7403)

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Men of the 2nd Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry on guard duty at the Bosch munition factory at Zons, near Cologne, during a rest period, 26 February 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239220 © IWM (Q 7400)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 26, 2019, 01:51:05 AM
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An ad from a Boston Symphony Orchestra concert program, 1919.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on February 28, 2019, 01:44:23 AM
Items from the Canadian Grocer trade magazine, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 02, 2019, 12:47:17 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Tombstone Epitaph., March 02, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 03, 2019, 12:49:07 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., March 03, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 05, 2019, 01:54:21 AM
From the Breeder and Sportsman magazine, March, 1919.

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Star Hawk
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Quote
Carnation Champion Yearling Bull $25,000 the great calf. Carnation Champion, whose picture and breeding I herewith attach and am going to ask the Breeder and Sportsman to publish the same because I think it will be a great benefit to many young men who are engaged in the breeding of Holsteins in the great West.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 06, 2019, 12:28:58 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 6, 1919.

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American enlisted men assembling at Knotty Ash camp near Liverpool for registration and assignment to English universities, 6 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205193011 © IWM (Q 69063)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 06, 2019, 01:46:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., March 06, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 06, 2019, 01:48:42 AM
Also from the March 6th issue of the Courier, this interesting bit of national news:

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 08, 2019, 01:10:16 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Bemidji (Minnesota) Daily Pioneer., March 08, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on March 08, 2019, 11:34:55 AM
After reading this page of posts, my only thought is that more the times change, the less people change.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 08, 2019, 12:44:16 PM
After reading this page of posts, my only thought is that more the times change, the less people change.

Well said, young fellow.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 11, 2019, 01:57:46 AM
From the book "Lansdowne School and the World War" (1919)

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 12, 2019, 01:23:35 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., March 12, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on March 12, 2019, 09:11:03 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., March 12, 1919.

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Betty was showing a bit too much ankle , huh?


Yooowza!!!


 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 13, 2019, 01:29:15 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Daily Capital (Salem, Oregon) Journal., March 13, 1919

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 14, 2019, 02:12:05 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Daily Capital Journal., March 14, 1919. 

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 14, 2019, 02:47:16 AM
From the Canadian Grocer, January-March 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on March 14, 2019, 07:43:12 PM
Nothing on sale?

How rude!

 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 15, 2019, 01:35:58 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 15, 1919.

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Steeplechase racing organized by the Cavalry Corps at Spa, 15 March 1919. An Officer preparing for a race.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245858 © IWM (Q 10145)

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Steeplechase racing organized by the Cavalry Corps at Spa, 15 March 1919. The Parade Ring.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245853 © IWM (Q 10140)

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Steeplechase racing organized by the Cavalry Corps at Spa, 15 March 1919. The Cavalry Corps Cup race.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245856 © IWM (Q 10143)

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Steeplechase racing organized by the Cavalry Corps at Spa, 15 March 1919. Refreshments for the troops.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245859 © IWM (Q 10146)

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Steeplechase racing organized by the Cavalry Corps at Spa, 15 March 1919. Handicap Steeplechase.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245854 © IWM (Q 10141)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 17, 2019, 01:44:58 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 17, 1919.

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Sentry of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) on duty in Cologne, Germany, 17 March 1917.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245839 © IWM (Q 10126)

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Women and children waiting to get milk which is allowed only for children under three years of age and for the sick. Cologne, 17 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245837 © IWM (Q 10124)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 17, 2019, 02:05:47 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee., March 17, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 18, 2019, 01:42:48 AM
From the Library of Congress. The Grants Pass Daily Courier., March 18, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 18, 2019, 01:56:45 AM
American jazz pianist and vocalist Nat King Cole was born one hundred years ago, yesterday. 
 
Biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nat_King_Cole

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 19, 2019, 12:25:18 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 19, 1919.

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Ruins of the church at Locon, looking towards the altar, 19 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205323661 © IWM (Q 78901)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 19, 2019, 12:42:37 AM
Everyone in New Orleans was playing jazz on March 19, 1919.  That's because The Axeman (a guy who had been periodically entering people's houses late at night so that he could kill and maim them with an axe) had written a letter to the local newspapers, threatening that he would kill anyone who wasn't playing jazz music.  The newspapers actually printed the letter.

From Wiki: The Axeman's Letter.

Quote
Hell, March 13, 1919
Esteemed Mortal of New Orleans:The Axeman

They have never caught me and they never will. They have never seen me, for I am invisible, even as the ether that surrounds your earth. I am not a human being, but a spirit and a demon from the hottest hell. I am what you Orleanians and your foolish police call the Axeman.
When I see fit, I shall come and claim other victims. I alone know whom they shall be. I shall leave no clue except my bloody axe, besmeared with blood and brains of he whom I have sent below to keep me company.
If you wish you may tell the police to be careful not to rile me. Of course, I am a reasonable spirit. I take no offense at the way they have conducted their investigations in the past. In fact, they have been so utterly stupid as to not only amuse me, but His Satanic Majesty, Francis Josef, etc. But tell them to beware. Let them not try to discover what I am, for it were better that they were never born than to incur the wrath of the Axeman. I don't think there is any need of such a warning, for I feel sure the police will always dodge me, as they have in the past. They are wise and know how to keep away from all harm.
Undoubtedly, you Orleanians think of me as a most horrible murderer, which I am, but I could be much worse if I wanted to. If I wished, I could pay a visit to your city every night. At will I could slay thousands of your best citizens (and the worst), for I am in close relationship with the Angel of Death.
Now, to be exact, at 12:15 (earthly time) on next Tuesday night, I am going to pass over New Orleans. In my infinite mercy, I am going to make a little proposition to you people. Here it is:
I am very fond of jazz music, and I swear by all the devils in the nether regions that every person shall be spared in whose home a jazz band is in full swing at the time I have just mentioned. If everyone has a jazz band going, well, then, so much the better for you people. One thing is certain and that is that some of your people who do not jazz it out on that specific Tuesday night (if there be any) will get the axe.
Well, as I am cold and crave the warmth of my native Tartarus, and it is about time I leave your earthly home, I will cease my discourse. Hoping that thou wilt publish this, that it may go well with thee, I have been, am and will be the worst spirit that ever existed either in fact or realm of fancy.

--The Axeman

Also from Wiki:
Quote
Motivated by press coverage of a mysterious letter sent to newspapers from the purported ax murderer promising those who were not playing jazz music on March 19 "will get the axe", dance halls in New Orleans were filled to capacity and hundreds of professional and amateur jazz musicians were hired to play at private parties in residential homes as a way to protect from attacks. No murders occurred that night.

Info on The Axeman: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axeman_of_New_Orleans   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 21, 2019, 12:53:51 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 21, 1919.

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Education in the British Army. Soldiers learning chemistry at the Bonn University with their officers as instructors, 21 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245880 © IWM (Q 10167)

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Education in the British Army. Soldiers learning chemistry at the Bonn University with their officers as instructors, 21 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245883 © IWM (Q 10170)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 21, 2019, 03:01:51 AM
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Image from page 936 of "Canadian grocer January-March 1919"
Quote
What Dreams are Made of There may be horrid dreams following big helpings of mince pie or plum pudding, but only lovely ones come after a dinner where Jell-O is the dessert.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Sleepwalker on March 22, 2019, 11:54:14 PM
What a great idea for topic. I will enjoy reading this. Thank you.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 23, 2019, 12:02:29 AM
What a great idea for topic. I will enjoy reading this. Thank you.

My pleasure!  And welcome to EllGab.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Farm Penis on March 23, 2019, 12:03:50 AM
What a great idea for topic. I will enjoy reading this. Thank you.
@Sleepwalker  So you're going to , sleep, walk, and read all at the same time? WOW!! YOUZA!!! GADFUCKINGZOOKS!!!!

+1 to you, sir.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Farm Penis on March 23, 2019, 12:06:28 AM
My pleasure!  And welcome to EllGab.
Rikki, your welcome is much better than mine :-[ ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Sleepwalker on March 23, 2019, 12:07:13 AM
My pleasure!  And welcome to EllGab.

Thank you. I've posted a few times at the old site but haven't contributed there in a long time and it went away and then I found this place.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Sleepwalker on March 23, 2019, 12:08:50 AM
@Sleepwalker  So you're going to , sleep, walk, and read all at the same time? WOW!! YOUZA!!! GADFUCKINGZOOKS!!!!

+1 to you, sir.

I actually don't sleep much anymore. What's a +1? I'll take it if it's free.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 23, 2019, 01:30:44 AM
From the Library of Congress, March 23, 1919.

The Omaha Daily Bee.
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The Tombstone Epitaph.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 24, 2019, 01:10:38 AM
San Francisco's beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti celebrates his 100th birthday today.

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Ferlinghetti
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 24, 2019, 01:29:29 AM
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An ad from page 484 of "Farmer and stockbreeder" March, 1919.
No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 26, 2019, 01:35:59 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 26, 1919.

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Clothing parade of the 13th Battalion, the King's (Liverpool Regiment) in front of the Bonn Bridge, 26 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245892 © IWM (Q 10179)

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British troops buying food in the Bonn market square, 26 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245891 © IWM (Q 10178)

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Men of the Lancashire Fusiliers and the Oxford and Bucks Light infantry being photographed by a German photographer in a model Rhine boat for the purpose of sending postcards home, 26 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205245889 © IWM (Q 10176)



 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on March 26, 2019, 07:49:52 AM
Keep up the good work Rikki. I don't always have a good comment handy but I always enjoy reading what you post.'


+1

:)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 28, 2019, 01:10:50 AM
Keep up the good work Rikki. I don't always have a good comment handy but I always enjoy reading what you post.'


+1

:)

I'm very happy that you like it.  Thanks for reading the thread, my friend.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 28, 2019, 01:19:46 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 28, 1919.

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Demonstration of air fighting by the Bristol Fighters of No. 48 Squadron at Cologne, 28th March 1919. The attacker "side-slipping" for tail position.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247483 © IWM (Q 11934)

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A British Caquot kite balloon over the River Rhine area at Cologne. Photograph taken from a Bristol Fighter of No. 48 Squadron, 28 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205247496 © IWM (Q 11947)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 29, 2019, 01:04:56 AM
From Wiki:
Quote
March 29, 1919.  The Stanley Cup series final ended undecided when players on both the Montreal Canadiens and Seattle Metropolitans became too ill to play due to the Spanish flu.
https://www.cbssports.com/nhl/news/remembering-when-the-nhl-canceled-the-1919-cup-final-due-to-flu-pandemic/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Bart Ell on March 29, 2019, 10:13:11 AM
From Wiki:https://www.cbssports.com/nhl/news/remembering-when-the-nhl-canceled-the-1919-cup-final-due-to-flu-pandemic/

Wimps!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on March 30, 2019, 10:38:55 AM
I do hope you will cover the little know and even less understood by historians, Soviet Polish war.

https://alphahistory.com/russianrevolution/the-polish-soviet-war/ (https://alphahistory.com/russianrevolution/the-polish-soviet-war/)


And the wiki....


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish–Soviet_War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish–Soviet_War)


Starting in 1919 and ending in 1921, this war probably should be viewed as a regional continuation of WW I.

How Poland would of looked had it been completely victorious.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 30, 2019, 02:32:16 PM
I do hope you will cover the little know and even less understood by historians, Soviet Polish war.

https://alphahistory.com/russianrevolution/the-polish-soviet-war/ (https://alphahistory.com/russianrevolution/the-polish-soviet-war/)


And the wiki....


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish–Soviet_War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish–Soviet_War)


Starting in 1919 and ending in 1921, this war probably should be viewed as a regional continuation of WW I.

How Poland would of looked had it been completely victorious.

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Interesting, and thanks for the info.  I doubt that I will cover these activities, but please feel free to post about them here.  (This is everyone's thread by the way.)  I was heavy into WWI for the past number of years, but now I'd prefer to narrow my scope to more 'needle in haystack' items that occurred one hundred years ago. I'm always on the lookout for strange, paranormal related stuff too.  But more worldly topics are definitely welcome here.  If you post it, I can guarantee that I will read it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 31, 2019, 12:51:03 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, March 31, 1919.

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A Cologne-Bonn tram car at Cologne, 31 March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239326 © IWM (Q 7506)

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Soldiers waiting on the bank of the Rhine in Köln for the steamer which is to take them to Rotterdam from where they are to go to England for demobilization. 31st March 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239321 © IWM (Q 7501)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on March 31, 2019, 02:01:56 AM
From the Library of Congress. The Richmond (Indiana) Palladium and Sun-Telegram., March 31, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 01, 2019, 12:39:21 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland Tidings., April 01, 1919. 

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: StarrMountain on April 01, 2019, 05:11:06 PM
Keep up the good work Rikki. I don't always have a good comment handy but I always enjoy reading what you post.'


+1

:)
True, dat! ;D  +1 ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 03, 2019, 12:50:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 3, 1919.

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British Military car travelling over snow-covered road near Zulpich, 3 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239315 © IWM (Q 7495)

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Train in which Marshal Ferdinand Foch travelled to Spa and which he held the conference with Herr Erzberger about the landing of General Haller's Blue Army at Gdansk. 3 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239307 © IWM (Q 7487)

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Herr Matthias Erzberger, seated on left, leaving Spa Station in a German car flying a white flag after the conference with Marshal Ferdinand Foch, 3 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239314 © IWM (Q 7494)

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on April 03, 2019, 06:38:19 AM
For those who may be unfamiliar with General Haller or the Blue Army.  These were Poles who had fought with the French on the Western Front. IIRC Due to shortages, even as the war progressed, the Poles were given old Horizon Blue uniforms to wear.

Not exactly a good color to wear on a battlefied in the machinegun era.

http://www.hallersarmy.com/ (http://www.hallersarmy.com/)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 04, 2019, 02:57:12 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier., April 04, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 05, 2019, 12:37:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 5, 1919.

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Members of the Royal Engineers marching past the British army General Headquarters, Murmansk, Russia, 5th April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205093162 © IWM (Q 16628)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 05, 2019, 12:59:29 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Wheeling Intelligencer, April 5, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 06, 2019, 12:51:13 AM
From page 4 of "Hardware Merchandising" March-June 1919.

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An actual photograph of Williams SUPERIOR Wrenches taken from the height of the 57th story of the Woolworth Building, during construction; 750 feet above City Hall Park. New York City. Star in picture: Singer Building, 41 stories in height.
No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 07, 2019, 02:08:34 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 07, 1919.
 
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 08, 2019, 12:37:25 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 8, 1919.

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A pile of German shells handed over in accordance with the Armistice terms and some of the German civilians who are to remove the fuses before the shells are sold as scrap iron. Civilians are working under the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Near Cologne, 8 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239341 © IWM (Q 7522)

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German civilians, working under the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, removing fuses from German shells handed over in accordance with the Armistice terms, before the shells are sold as scrap iron. Near Cologne, 8 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239340 © IWM (Q 7521)

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Men of the Rhine Motor Transport Company, Army Service Corps in the brewery in which they were billeted. Near Cologne, 8 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239336 © IWM (Q 7517)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 08, 2019, 07:50:11 AM
Wow! That is quite the beer barrel!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 09, 2019, 12:53:04 AM
Wow! That is quite the beer barrel!

Yes, it certainly is.  I love German beer so I would have been looking for a drill if I'd have been one of those British soldiers, haha.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 09, 2019, 01:04:09 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 09, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 09, 2019, 01:34:26 AM
From the National Museum of the U.S. Navy.

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Packing shipment of Matzoths (matzos) for the 77th Division for men of Jewish Faith in the A.E.F. for the Passover Holiday, at Warehouse #40, Q.M.C. Depot, St. Denis. Lieutenant Colonel Wards, Q.M.C. standing in the left, Paris, Seine, France, April 9, 1919.
U.S. Army Signal Corps Photograph. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. (2016/07/22).
Public domain  https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 09, 2019, 01:01:12 PM
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Sorry, I couldn't resist.  (Notice I screwed up the letter u in taught.  Looks more like a w.)

@Rikki Gins  , if the good nuns saw that "u", you would have been sent to the cloakroom. Greetings, I am pulling up my roots in the HW thread. @Bart Ell  suggested I should take a stroll over and take a look at your postings.  I wonder if cursive penmanship will become obsolete. I was taught the Palmer Method of penmanship by the good nuns. 
I am thankful that I learned how to read and write cursive writing. I am a family tree nerd. One must be able to read cursive writing if you are reading old records. The first Federal Population Census was taken in 1790. On Ancestry, 1940 is the last Federal Census that is available. All Federal Census records are written in cursive writing.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 09, 2019, 05:07:53 PM
@Rikki Gins  , if the good nuns saw that "u", you would have been sent to the cloakroom. Greetings, I am pulling up my roots in the HW thread. @Bart Ell  suggested I should take a stroll over and take a look at your postings.  I wonder if cursive penmanship will become obsolete. I was taught the Palmer Method of penmanship by the good nuns. 
I am thankful that I learned how to read and write cursive writing. I am a family tree nerd. One must be able to read cursive writing if you are reading old records. The first Federal Population Census was taken in 1790. On Ancestry, 1940 is the last Federal Census that is available. All Federal Census records are written in cursive writing.

Thanks for the info, @FISH.  You are always welcome here at the 100 Years Ago thread.  My sample of cursive is kind of remarkable when you consider that I'm a lefty.  (That horrible over-hook was nearly impossible to overcome.)  The nuns would surely have run screaming if they had seen my cursive writing from the age of eight.  Thankfully, we didn't write anything down during the Sunday class.  We read from a nice, pastel colored booklet that I gradually chewed to a pulp out of sheer boredom.  When a pretty nun saw what I had done she was shocked and bewildered but there was no ruler to the knuckles.  I was kicked out of the church, though.  The priest told Mom that my older brothers could continue attending church, but that I was a hopeless case.  I'm OK with that.     
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 09, 2019, 05:14:45 PM
Thanks for the info, @FISH.  You are always welcome here at the 100 Years Ago thread.  My sample of cursive is kind of remarkable when you consider that I'm a lefty.  (That horrible over-hook was nearly impossible to overcome.)  The nuns would surely have run screaming if they had seen my cursive writing from the age of eight.  Thankfully, we didn't write anything down during the Sunday class.  We read from a nice, pastel colored booklet that I gradually chewed to a pulp out of sheer boredom.  When a pretty nun saw what I had done she was shocked and bewildered but there was no ruler to the knuckles.  I was kicked out of the church, though.  The priest told Mom that my older brothers could continue attending church, but that I was a hopeless case.  I'm OK with that.     

Well that doesn't see like a very priestly thing for him to say!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 10, 2019, 12:55:34 AM
Well that doesn't see like a very priestly thing for him to say!

No, it wasn't, but I think that there was an ulterior motive for him to have said that, beyond my chewing up the book.  After the passing of so many years, I'm pretty sure that I can join up again, anytime that I want.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 10, 2019, 01:04:49 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 10, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 10, 2019, 06:34:35 AM
Thanks for the info, @FISH.  You are always welcome here at the 100 Years Ago thread.  My sample of cursive is kind of remarkable when you consider that I'm a lefty.  (That horrible over-hook was nearly impossible to overcome.)  The nuns would surely have run screaming if they had seen my cursive writing from the age of eight.  Thankfully, we didn't write anything down during the Sunday class.  We read from a nice, pastel colored booklet that I gradually chewed to a pulp out of sheer boredom.  When a pretty nun saw what I had done she was shocked and bewildered but there was no ruler to the knuckles.  I was kicked out of the church, though.  The priest told Mom that my older brothers could continue attending church, but that I was a hopeless case.  I'm OK with that.     
@Rikki Gins , thanks for giving me a good morning laugh. I always said "you can not trust a lefty".  My brother is a lefty. He is an incredible musician. He would tell me that most musical instruments are for left handed dominance. The best musicians are left handed, according to my brother.  He may be "right" ::)  Being left handed is a gift. Also I want to note his penmanship is horrible.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 10, 2019, 09:07:30 AM
@Rikki Gins , thanks for giving me a good morning laugh. I always said "you can not trust a lefty".  My brother is a lefty. He is an incredible musician. He would tell me that most musical instruments are for left handed dominance. The best musicians are left handed, according to my brother.  He may be "right" ::)  Being left handed is a gift. Also I want to note his penmanship is horrible.

Are you left handed @FISH ?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 10, 2019, 12:50:09 PM
Are you left handed @FISH ?
@anniem , right handed for the most part. However, I learned how to how to hold a plaster trowel with both hands. Are you a lefty?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 10, 2019, 12:53:26 PM
From Wiki:https://www.cbssports.com/nhl/news/remembering-when-the-nhl-canceled-the-1919-cup-final-due-to-flu-pandemic/
really, who gets mumps in 2014 2019?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 10, 2019, 12:57:45 PM
@anniem , right handed for the most part. However, I learned how to how to hold a plaster trowel with both hands. Are you a lefty?

Ambidextrous. I can learn either way. In kindergarden they let you do what you wanted, it felt the same in either so I just wrote lefty. Scissors I did righty.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on April 11, 2019, 04:38:15 AM
@Rikki Gins  , if the good nuns saw that "u", you would have been sent to the cloakroom. Greetings, I am pulling up my roots in the HW thread. @Bart Ell  suggested I should take a stroll over and take a look at your postings.  I wonder if cursive penmanship will become obsolete. I was taught the Palmer Method of penmanship by the good nuns. 
I am thankful that I learned how to read and write cursive writing. I am a family tree nerd. One must be able to read cursive writing if you are reading old records. The first Federal Population Census was taken in 1790. On Ancestry, 1940 is the last Federal Census that is available. All Federal Census records are written in cursive writing.

Reading it is fine. I think most of us old timers were taught how to write in cursive.  Now understanding what I write might be a chore because my writing is horrible.

:(
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 11, 2019, 06:56:49 AM
Reading it is fine. I think most of us old timers were taught how to write in cursive.  Now understanding what I write might be a chore because my writing is horrible.
:(

Mine is too   ???
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 12, 2019, 12:43:52 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 12, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 12, 2019, 05:16:39 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 12, 1919.

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In the 100 years since the Spanish flu outbreak, there have been four influenza pandemics: 1957-1958, 1968-1969, 1977-1978, and 2009-2010. None were as lethal as the 1918 outbreak.
I sign up for the flu shot every year.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 14, 2019, 01:01:12 AM
In the 100 years since the Spanish flu outbreak, there have been four influenza pandemics: 1957-1958, 1968-1969, 1977-1978, and 2009-2010. None were as lethal as the 1918 outbreak.
I sign up for the flu shot every year.

I think I had the 2009 one.  I was at work and made the mistake of talking with a guy that was going home due to being sick.  I started working and got so sick that I could hardly stand up.  I told two guys that I was going home and they both got sick as dogs later that night.  This was the only flu I ever had that resulted in me getting bronchitis and I had to use inhalers etc.  Since then, I get the flu shot every year too.  Besides, it's the only thing I can get for free on Medicare. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 14, 2019, 01:09:54 AM
An Image from page 267 of "Lansdowne School and the World War" (1919)

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Quote
Joseph Ryan entered the service June 27, 1918. He was sent to Camp Greenleaf for training and was placed in Evacuation Ambulance Company No. 15. He sailed for overseas August23, 1918. While on his way to the front he was attacked by the flu and was taken to Base Hospital 101, September 30th, and died on the morning of October 1st. He was buried in the American Cemetery at St. Nazaire. Everyone who knew Private Ryan remembers him as a kind friend and a genial companion. His loss will be keenly felt.
No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 14, 2019, 06:27:24 AM
Working on the family tree, I discover a long lost great uncle served in WWI. As I researched his military history, I learned that he served with Co L, 109 INF, 28th Div.  "The 28th received its baptism of fire on July 15, 1918, during the German Army's Champagne-Marne Offensive. Four companies from the 28th were attached to a French division on the front line, while the rest of the division took up second-line defense positions. Two of the companies, L and M, were from the 109th Infantry Regiment made of the old 1st and 13th Pennsylvania Regiments. In the early hours of July 15, the German 36th Division crossed the Marne River and attacked the Allied front. When the adjacent French units fell back, L and M Companies were surrounded. Wave after wave of Germans attacked the Pennsylvanians. Despite the overwhelming odds, the two companies stubbornly held their position and inflicted heavy casualties. At 0800 the remnants of L and M Companies withdrew and fought their way back to the front line of the 109th, five kilometers away. Of the 500 assigned officers and men only 150 remained. The brunt of the German offensive now fell on the 109 Infantry and the other units of the 28th Division. For three days, the 109th held its positions while under heavy attack. Fighting in ravines, woods and trenches, the doughboys fought like veterans. A German after-action report described the battle as "the most severe defeat of the war." For its staunch defense the 109th was nicknamed "Men of Iron" and the 28th was later dubbed the "Iron Division"."
 http://www.bloodybucket.be/109thIRengl.htm

There was no photo of this long lost great uncle who was 1 of the 150 men who survived. He was a man who was made from IRON.
On Ebay, I purchased a 5 volume history on the 28th Division from WW1. Amazing history and photographs in this publication. A photo was published of every soldier who served in the 28th. I found great uncle’s photo. His photo is part of the Family Tree. (Photo of 2 of the volumes I purchased. I purchased all 5 volumes).
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 14, 2019, 06:31:27 AM
Doughboys
Photo from my book
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 14, 2019, 06:32:32 AM
Somewhere in France
photo from my book
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 14, 2019, 06:41:58 AM
Some of the Rules for working on a Family Tree:  Know how to read cursive penmanship. Learn how to read maps from different eras. Learn the names of diseases from the past. Learn the history of The Wars.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 14, 2019, 11:56:24 PM
Thank you for the fascinating information regarding your great uncle, Fish. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 15, 2019, 12:04:04 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 15, 1919.

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Picquet of the 9th Scottish Rifles at the boundary of the Cologne bridgehead, a barrier on the Dusseldorf road, near the Reisholz. 15 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239357 © IWM (Q 7539)

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A picquet of the 9th Scottish Rifles. Examination of a parcel carried by a man entering the British zone at the barrier on the Dusseldorf Road near the Reisholz. 15 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239355 © IWM (Q 7537)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 15, 2019, 12:31:37 AM
From page 338 of "Chemical Engineering" 1919.

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AIR CONDITIONING DEPARTMENT—COMPRESSORS AND COOLERS must be thoroughly refined so as to prevent as far as possible the accumulation of foreign salts in the nucleus solution and especially remove the potassium salts, which have the property of crystallizing out with the needle ammonium nitrate, forming a highly undesirable impurity in amatol.
(This was all one sentence.)
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 15, 2019, 09:34:25 AM
APRIL 15TH should be a Public Holiday in the USA. ::)
I am enjoying the The World War photographs.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 16, 2019, 01:52:17 AM
APRIL 15TH should be a Public Holiday in the USA. ::)
I am enjoying the The World War photographs.

Yes, I like the pictures too.  The Imperial War Museum in Great Britain has been a great source for them.  They don't care if you reproduce their pictures, either, just so long as you display the pic's https code and the IWM reference number.  The amount of pictures have been greatly reduced of late.  I guess that's to be expected, what with the war being over and all.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 16, 2019, 02:01:12 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 16, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 16, 2019, 07:02:07 AM
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Sorry, I couldn't resist.  (Notice I screwed up the letter u in taught.  Looks more like a w.)
THE V AND THE U. AND THE W!
It appears to me to be an vgly habit of members have of writing a W for a U. Vnacceptable!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 16, 2019, 07:51:51 PM
THE V AND THE U. AND THE W!
It appears to me to be an vgly habit of members have of writing a W for a U. Vnacceptable!

Ha ha!!!  Good comparison, Fish.  But now what can I do?  I'm a hundred years too late in pointing out to the author of the above V and the U that he/she missed a U in the word 'architectural'.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 16, 2019, 08:20:44 PM
Ha ha!!!  Good comparison, Fish.  But now what can I do?  I'm a hundred years too late in pointing out to the author of the above V and the U that he/she missed a U in the word 'architectural'.

Travel back, of course
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 16, 2019, 08:35:50 PM
Travel back, of course

Of course!  What was I thinking?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 17, 2019, 01:59:18 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 17, 1919.

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https://www.odmp.org/officer/23244-detective-sergeant-ambrose-banta

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 17, 2019, 05:44:53 AM
Reading the clips from The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 17, 1919 was a hoot. My two top funniest clips are the the happy-go-lucky steeplejack vs the psychic real estate woman. The man with the 4 month “arm” problem must be given honorable mention.  ???
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 17, 2019, 07:40:31 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 17, 1919.

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https://www.odmp.org/officer/23244-detective-sergeant-ambrose-banta

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good stuff!!! LOL
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 17, 2019, 01:27:50 PM
good stuff!!! LOL

Great!  Glad you like it.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 17, 2019, 01:39:39 PM
Reading the clips from The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 17, 1919 was a hoot. My two top funniest clips are the the happy-go-lucky steeplejack vs the psychic real estate woman. The man with the 4 month “arm” problem must be given honorable mention.  ???

Thanks for the feedback, Fish.  I must confess to picking and choosing these little snippets of news as there are quite a number of them in each column.  I like to look for the unusual and the humorous.  There are some horrific ones too, involving babies and kids, but I won't be showing those. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 18, 2019, 02:46:09 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 18, 1919.

Indiana Briefs

FORT WAYNE A thief crashed in a heavy show window worth $200, in
the front of the Patterson-Fletcher store, to steal $45 worth of clothing.
He escaped.

MUNCIE Mr. and Mrs. John Black, parents of Michael Black, boatswain's
mate, who tried to smuggle his French sweetheart across the ocean, disguised
as a negro stevedore, said that their son met Mile. Black when he rescued
her from two Algerians in a lonely Marseilles street.

GARY A huge crowd which gathered at the station today to greet and
parade with Walter Petkey, returned from France, was disappointed when
his mother met the train and insisted that her boy go home with her at once.
The mother had three sons in service, one of whom, John, is recovering from
wounds in France.

PETERSBURG Farmers in northern Pike county along the White river are
aroused over the finding of their sticks of dynamite, with the fuses which
had been lit but put out by the water, floating beneath the big concrete
water gate, which holds high water from thousands of acres of farm land.

INDIANAPOLIS A gigantic swindling scheme was uncovered by the
arrest of L. S. Scott, Hugh McGann, Billy Schoeber, Joe Engleton and Edward Siler
say federal officers.  Operations involving at least $150,00 have been attributed
to the men.  It is alleged that they induced their victims to bet on a fake
prizefight in which the fighter on whom they bet was "killed" and the victims,
frightened, left their money in the hands of the operator.

Ohio Briefs

TOLEDO Toledo' s crime wave, during which eight persons have met with violent
deaths in two weeks, must be ended, Mayor Schrelber told policemen.
He said the police department was in a rut.

Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 19, 2019, 12:35:56 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April, 19, 1919.

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Interior of the Officers' Club during a lunch at the GHQ in Montreuil, France, 19 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236315 © IWM (Q 3795)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 19, 2019, 01:37:00 AM
Image from page 1538 of Hardware Merchandising March-June 1919.

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The Sanitary and Hygienic Wall Finish that can be guaranteed to satisfy —in beautiful, non-fading tints—perfect flat finish without gloss—sets like cement—for flat surface or ornamental work. Will stand constant washing with soap and water without fading or deterioration.
No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 19, 2019, 05:17:38 AM
Image from page 1538 of Hardware Merchandising March-June 1919.

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No known copyright restrictions  https://www.flickr.com/commons/usage/

I guess a hundred years ago, folks washed their walls. Those days are gone.  I enjoy painting my walls, I think...
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 19, 2019, 04:05:14 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 19, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 20, 2019, 12:50:07 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 20, 1919.

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British troops entering the Easter fair in the grounds of the Museum of Anathomy at Cologne, Germany, 20 April 1919. The group of soldiers in the right are servicemen of the Machine Gun Corps.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236311 © IWM (Q 3790)

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British soldiers enjoying a carousel round at the Easter fair at Cologne, 20 April 1919. The soldier in the center sharing a place with two little German boys.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236305 © IWM (Q 3784)

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British soldiers going down a sleigh run at the Easter fair at Cologne, 20 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236298  © IWM (Q 3777)

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British soldiers enjoying a carousel round at the Easter fair at Cologne, 20 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236304 © IWM (Q 3783)

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British soldiers boating in the Park Lake during the Easter time at Cologne, 20 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205236312 © IWM (Q 3791)


Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 20, 2019, 05:28:11 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 19, 1919.

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I like Mr Phillip Gagen. He was right to try to stop progress. Too many big streets and too many cars in 2019.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on April 20, 2019, 06:08:58 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 18, 1919.

Indiana Briefs

FORT WAYNE A thief crashed in a heavy show window worth $200, in
the front of the Patterson-Fletcher store, to steal $45 worth of clothing.
He escaped.

MUNCIE Mr. and Mrs. John Black, parents of Michael Black, boatswain's
mate, who tried to smuggle his French sweetheart across the ocean, disguised
as a negro stevedore, said that their son met Mile. Black when he rescued
her from two Algerians in a lonely Marseilles street.

GARY A huge crowd which gathered at the station today to greet and
parade with Walter Petkey, returned from France, was disappointed when
his mother met the train and insisted that her boy go home with her at once.
The mother had three sons in service, one of whom, John, is recovering from
wounds in France.

PETERSBURG Farmers in northern Pike county along the White river are
aroused over the finding of their sticks of dynamite, with the fuses which
had been lit but put out by the water, floating beneath the big concrete
water gate, which holds high water from thousands of acres of farm land.

INDIANAPOLIS A gigantic swindling scheme was uncovered by the
arrest of L. S. Scott, Hugh McGann, Billy Schoeber, Joe Engleton and Edward Siler
say federal officers.  Operations involving at least $150,00 have been attributed
to the men.  It is alleged that they induced their victims to bet on a fake
prizefight in which the fighter on whom they bet was "killed" and the victims,
frightened, left their money in the hands of the operator.

Ohio Briefs

TOLEDO Toledo' s crime wave, during which eight persons have met with violent
deaths in two weeks, must be ended, Mayor Schrelber told policemen.
He said the police department was in a rut.


Quite possible the police department was the CAUSE of the crime wave or in on it in some other way. Pay offs...what ever.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 21, 2019, 01:34:55 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 21, 1919.
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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/61385190/john-e_-courtney
Listed under the name of Ralph Courtney, but it is actually a detailed article about John's accident:
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/155820126/ralph-courtney

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 21, 2019, 07:32:08 AM
I guess a hundred years ago, folks washed their walls. Those days are gone.  I enjoy painting my walls, I think...
Oh man, every year my Mom had us wash walls.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Kidnostad on April 21, 2019, 10:16:33 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland Tidings., April 01, 1919. 

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Okay, with most of the articles being feminine in nature, ya gotta wonder if he was a cross dresser.  No disrespect intended. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 21, 2019, 01:49:55 PM
Okay, with most of the articles being feminine in nature, ya gotta wonder if he was a cross dresser.  No disrespect intended.

Who would know.  Only Mr. Hall would know for sure.  Haha.  (This is a repost...I completely misread your 'articles being feminine in nature' comment.)  Thanks for reading the thread.     
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Kidnostad on April 21, 2019, 01:58:39 PM
Who would know.  Only Mr. Hall would know for sure.  Haha.  (This is a repost...I completely misread your 'articles being feminine in nature' comment.)  Thanks for reading the thread.     

Yeah, I could have worded that better. 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 22, 2019, 08:39:05 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 22, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 23, 2019, 12:58:18 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 23, 1919.

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Demobilized men handing in their rifles before boarding the Rhine steamer. The steamer took them to Rotterdam on their way to England. Cologne, 23 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239361 © IWM (Q 7545)

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Demobilized men boarding the Rhine steamer which took them to Rotterdam on their way to England. They are giving up their rifles and bayonets which had to be sealed up during the passage through Dutch waters and were afterwards served out to them again. Cologne, 23rd April 1919.
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YMCA book and sundries store on board the Rhine steamer which carried demobilized men from Cologne to Rotterdam, 23 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239363 © IWM (Q 7547)

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Demobilized men on the Rhine steamer which took them to Rotterdam on their way to England. Note field kitchen in foreground in which the meals were cooked. Cologne, 23 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239359 © IWM (Q 7541)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 24, 2019, 01:55:10 AM
Quote
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 24, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 25, 2019, 01:30:27 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 25, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 25, 2019, 07:14:22 AM
Mr. Fox’s Family must have had quite the happy surprise! I wonder how often that sort of mix up happened?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on April 25, 2019, 10:29:45 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 22, 1919.

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Didn't hit them? Hopefully that guy worked on shot placement later in life.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 25, 2019, 01:55:47 PM
Re: The guy who was hit by lightning while feeding the hogs.  I found a Wilson Lavengood at Find A Grave, but he would have been too old to have been hit by the lightning. He did however have a son named Daniel, and he was the one that got hit by the lightning.

Wilson Lavengood: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98008097/wilson-lavengood
Daniel Lavengood:  https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98007970/daniel-c-lavengood
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 25, 2019, 02:49:54 PM
This is a great thread
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 25, 2019, 03:18:29 PM
This is a great thread

Nice of you to say, anniem.  Enjoy!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 26, 2019, 01:36:23 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 26, 1919.

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Royal Artillery wagon, loaded with German cordite, arriving to be burnt. It was surrendered in accordance with the Armistice terms. Cologne, 26 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239380 © IWM (Q 7564)

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Gunners of the Royal Artillery with bundles of sticks of German cordite which they are about to burn. Cologne, 26 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239379 © IWM (Q 7563)

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British troops burning German cordite at Cologne, 26 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239377 © IWM (Q 7561)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 26, 2019, 05:44:37 AM
Re: The guy who was hit by lightning while feeding the hogs.  I found a Wilson Lavengood at Find A Grave, but he would have been too old to have been hit by the lightning. He did however have a son named Daniel, and he was the one that got hit by the lightning.

Wilson Lavengood: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98008097/wilson-lavengood
Daniel Lavengood:  https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/98007970/daniel-c-lavengood
I visited Daniel's grave today.
Thank you for all your postings, Find a Grave is a great resource. I am the family tree nerd in my family and I love "www.findagrave.com". Some members at "Find A Grave" will help a stranger.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on April 26, 2019, 07:17:18 AM
I visited Daniel's grave today.
Thank you for all your postings, Find a Grave is a great resource. I am the family tree nerd in my family and I love "www.findagrave.com". Some members at "Find A Grave" will help a stranger.

How cool!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 26, 2019, 01:36:38 PM
I visited Daniel's grave today.
Thank you for all your postings, Find a Grave is a great resource. I am the family tree nerd in my family and I love "www.findagrave.com". Some members at "Find A Grave" will help a stranger.

How nice that you were able to reach across a gulf of 100 years to give remembrance to, for all intense and purposes, a forgotten, needle in a haystack.  This is what I like about the thread.  Very nice, Fish.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 26, 2019, 02:00:40 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 26, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 28, 2019, 06:57:34 AM
Dear Aunt Polly,
A hundred years later, the question remains unanswered. What does a spirit look like?
We now have the Ghost Hunt Kit - Spirit Box - 822A & MEL EMF Meters - Recorder - Case & More for $899.99 plus shipping on Amazon.
Yet the question remains unanswered. Why is that Aunt Polly?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 28, 2019, 04:11:03 PM
Dear Aunt Polly,
A hundred years later, the question remains unanswered. What does a spirit look like?
We now have the Ghost Hunt Kit - Spirit Box - 822A & MEL EMF Meters - Recorder - Case & More for $899.99 plus shipping on Amazon.
Yet the question remains unanswered. Why is that Aunt Polly?


Haha, well said, Fish.  Let us know if she answers.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 28, 2019, 04:23:58 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 28, 1919.

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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/119203222/edna-l-ertel
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 29, 2019, 01:05:00 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 29, 1919.

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Soldiers waiting for a steamer to take them on a pleasure trip on the Rhine. In the distance some of the Motor Launch Flotilla can be seen moored to the Clubhouse of the Cologne Water Sports Club. 29 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239390 © IWM (Q 7574)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 29, 2019, 07:41:31 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 29, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 29, 2019, 08:30:14 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 29, 1919.

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Oh my this is an outstanding collection!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 29, 2019, 08:42:06 PM
Oh my this is an outstanding collection!

Glad you like it, PolkaDot.  This newspaper has some good content.  Similar to one called the Chicago Day Book, but they went out of business in 1917 or 1918, I can't remember which.  Of course there are a number of other newspapers in the Library of Congress database, but many of them are not very interesting or are too faded to use as clippings.  But I keep perusing them, looking for something special.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 30, 2019, 01:08:05 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, April 30, 1919.

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Barges converted into sleeping quarters for demobilized men awaiting the Rotterdam steamer. Cologne, 30 April 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239389 © IWM (Q 7573)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on April 30, 2019, 04:45:42 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., April 30, 1919.

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(Not a good day in the Great State of Ohio.)
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on April 30, 2019, 06:07:16 PM
A table cloth was tied to Benjamin Martin? Not a good day for the Smoot family and Benjamin. ::)

Sounds like lots of whiskey and some bottles could be found on the roads back in the day. ???
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on April 30, 2019, 08:03:02 PM
One of my favorite stories from my Great Aunt was regarding her older brother bootlegging whisky. At one point the cops where chasing them down and he veered off the dirt road straight into the cornfields- speeding and bouncing like crazy while mowing down the corn with their car. She was 10 or 11 at the time with no idea what was going on and scared to death! She would chuckle when she told it with the memory and would always say something to the effect of "I should have known something was up when he offered to drive me in the first place!".
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Kidnostad on April 30, 2019, 11:38:43 PM
I had a great uncle who was a bootlegger back in the day.  One of the stories about him is that he collected a pile of money in advance of a ship coming in from somewhere with a cargo of fine aged scotch.  After several delays in delivering the scotch, he declared that the ship had sunk and the money couldn't be recovered from the foreign source by any legal means due to the 18th Amendment prohibition against the sale and consumption of alcohol.  He was a big Irishman with a reputation and nobody argued the point. It seems that most every family history includes some horse thieves and some heroes.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 01, 2019, 12:07:47 AM
PolkaDot and Kid, very cool family history snippets there.  Thank you for sharing.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 01, 2019, 12:25:15 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 1, 1919.

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Admiral David Beatty on the day of his promotion to Admiral of the Fleet, on the quarter deck of HMS Queen Elizabeth of the 5th Battle Squadron (Grand Fleet).
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205357441 © IWM (Q 68667)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 01, 2019, 05:12:50 AM
PolkaDot and Kid, very cool family history snippets there.  Thank you for sharing.
YES! Great family stories. I hope someone is working on your family trees and saving "the stories" and saving the nicknames.
@Kidnostad yes, you are correct every family tree has some horse thieves and some heroes. Most of my ancestors came from Ireland. In addition to collecting the family stories, I had to learn their legal first names.
A child is born. The baby is given the first name after one of the elders in the family. However, the legal given name is only used on the birth certificate. The baby is raised with a different name but not with an endearing nickname. For example: my Aunt Mildred's legal first name is "Frances" and not "Mildred". I had to force my Mom to tell me the legal first names of her brothers and sisters for me to complete our family tree.
Recently, my dear "Aunt Deanie" passed over at the age of 94 years old. Long story short, I had to open an estate account after her passing over. First order of business was going to City Hall and file a legal "also known as" to open an estate account. Aunt Deanie had 3 different given names in addition to her nickname "Deanie".

In retrospect, I am not sure if the habit of having different first names is an Irish tradition, a Southern Tradition or just my family's tradition.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 01, 2019, 07:48:32 PM
YES! Great family stories. I hope someone is working on your family trees and saving "the stories" and saving the nicknames.
@Kidnostad yes, you are correct every family tree has some horse thieves and some heroes. Most of my ancestors came from Ireland. In addition to collecting the family stories, I had to learn their legal first names.
A child is born. The baby is given the first name after one of the elders in the family. However, the legal given name is only used on the birth certificate. The baby is raised with a different name but not with an endearing nickname. For example: my Aunt Mildred's legal first name is "Frances" and not "Mildred". I had to force my Mom to tell me the legal first names of her brothers and sisters for me to complete our family tree.
Recently, my dear "Aunt Deanie" passed over at the age of 94 years old. Long story short, I had to open an estate account after her passing over. First order of business was going to City Hall and file a legal "also known as" to open an estate account. Aunt Deanie had 3 different given names in addition to her nickname "Deanie".

In retrospect, I am not sure if the habit of having different first names is an Irish tradition, a Southern Tradition or just my family's tradition.

Very interesting.  I hadn't known that people had additional names like that.  I like your aunt's nickname.  Sweet!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 01, 2019, 08:13:31 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 1, 1919.


The Madison Daily Leader.

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The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 02, 2019, 04:15:03 AM
Very interesting.  I hadn't known that people had additional names like that.  I like your aunt's nickname.  Sweet!
My Aunt Deanie was sweet and very funny. We often referred to her as the DEANER. A photo of Deanie in her 90's on a bike.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 02, 2019, 04:20:26 AM
First Red Scare
:RE Fort Wayne
As I read this clip, I became curious why someone would be arrested if a red flag was flourished during a “Bolshevik” meeting on a Thursday night?
As I googled "Bolshevik” in the USA, I learned about the First Red Scare period during the early 20th-century in the USA. It was a time marked by a widespread fear of Bolshevism and anarchism, due to real and imagined events. What a surprise to read about the history of May Day riots of 1919. Silly me. I have spent hours learning the history of Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra without a complete understanding. I knew that the Tsar and his family were executed in 1918 by local Bolsheviks, all under the command of Bolshevik Yakov Yurovsky.  I was not aware of the RED FLAG movement in the USA in 1919.
As always, thanks for sharing our history from 100 years ago.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: 26 horses on May 02, 2019, 09:41:58 AM
My Aunt Deanie was sweet and very funny. We often referred to her as the DEANER. A photo of Deanie in her 90's on a bike.

Bless her!

Spry and a full sense of humor, that take self awareness few can muster at any age. :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 02, 2019, 11:56:24 AM
First Red Scare
:RE Fort Wayne
As I read this clip, I became curious why someone would be arrested if a red flag was flourished during a “Bolshevik” meeting on a Thursday night?
As I googled "Bolshevik” in the USA, I learned about the First Red Scare period during the early 20th-century in the USA. It was a time marked by a widespread fear of Bolshevism and anarchism, due to real and imagined events. What a surprise to read about the history of May Day riots of 1919. Silly me. I have spent hours learning the history of Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra without a complete understanding. I knew that the Tsar and his family were executed in 1918 by local Bolsheviks, all under the command of Bolshevik Yakov Yurovsky.  I was not aware of the RED FLAG movement in the USA in 1919.
As always, thanks for sharing our history from 100 years ago.

I always have trouble comprehending Bolshevik related moments in history.  I read about them but can't retain anything.  Still, I will post news items about them, and am very happy to do so, Fish.  Just so you know, I really enjoy reading your comments on these various news items.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 02, 2019, 03:13:40 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 2, 1919.


The Grants Pass Daily Courier.

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The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/54388526/edward-john-strodel
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/123082161/paul-moore-ogg
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 03, 2019, 01:29:33 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 3, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 03, 2019, 06:24:18 AM
For over 30 years, I have been a volunteer with a local Vietnam Veterans organization. I have firsthand experience with talking to not only veterans but also their families. At this point in time, all the Gold Star parents have passed over. I was very young during the Vietnam War Era, yet I remember the political issues surrounding this era.
Reading these 100 year old news clips is fascinating. I was aware of “Shell Shock” in WWI and Russian Civil War, (1918–20).  Reading these ordinary small town new stories, gives me insight into repercussions of war on the veterans living in 1919.  RE: NOISY AUTOS IRRITATE NERVES OF SOLDIERS.
The Russian Civil War and the May Day riots of 1919 in Cleveland, Ohio on May 1 were connected-the Bolshevik reverberations. No wonder Hugo Ruemmele was knocked to the ground in Cincinnati.
Just so you know, I really enjoy reading your news clips. How do you do it? Are you employed with the Library of Congress? ::)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 03, 2019, 06:29:52 AM
Has anyone read this book?
The Soldiers' War: The Great War Through Veterans' Eyes
by Richard van Emden
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 04, 2019, 12:38:42 PM
Has anyone read this book?
The Soldiers' War: The Great War Through Veterans' Eyes
by Richard van Emden

No, but oddly enough I have read another 'Veterans-WWI' book by Mr. Emden, called  Veterans: The Last Survivors of the Great War.  Actually, the copy I have is an offshoot of the original title.  It was written up to be a companion piece for interviews that were aired on the BBC.  (Interviews with Britain's remaining group of WWI veterans, both male (soldiers & sailors) and female (nurses.)  It has been quite a number of years since I read the book and I can't remember anything about it.  I do recall that I enjoyed reading it, though.  I should give it another read, I suppose.  On another note, the last American veteran of WWI was Frank Buckles.  I sent Frank an e-mail letter some eight years ago and his PR man was quite touched by it.  He wrote back to say that he would make every effort to read the e-mail to Frank, who by that time was sleeping almost all of the time, except for short periods where he would become conscious.  In fact, Frank died several weeks after I sent the e-mail.  I've often wondered if it was ever read to him or not.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Buckles
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 06, 2019, 01:16:45 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 6, 1919.

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The Royal Naval Motor Launch patrol on the river Rhine, 6 May 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239407 © IWM (Q 7591)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 07, 2019, 09:06:48 AM
No, but oddly enough I have read another 'Veterans-WWI' book by Mr. Emden, called  Veterans: The Last Survivors of the Great War.  Actually, the copy I have is an offshoot of the original title.  It was written up to be a companion piece for interviews that were aired on the BBC.  (Interviews with Britain's remaining group of WWI veterans, both male (soldiers & sailors) and female (nurses.)  It has been quite a number of years since I read the book and I can't remember anything about it.  I do recall that I enjoyed reading it, though.  I should give it another read, I suppose.  On another note, the last American veteran of WWI was Frank Buckles.  I sent Frank an e-mail letter some eight years ago and his PR man was quite touched by it.  He wrote back to say that he would make every effort to read the e-mail to Frank, who by that time was sleeping almost all of the time, except for short periods where he would become conscious.  In fact, Frank died several weeks after I sent the e-mail.  I've often wondered if it was ever read to him or not.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Buckles
You wrote to Frank Buckles shortly before he passed over. WOW !
He died at the age of 110 years old. I believe that your letter was read to him. Do people like Frank Buckles still exist in our current world?
Yesterday was National Nurses Day. So many of our Veterans and nurses made so many great sacrifices during the war years.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 07, 2019, 12:11:53 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 7, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 07, 2019, 03:07:42 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier, May 7, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 08, 2019, 01:07:59 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 8, 1919.

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Firemen extinguishing a fire at Murmansk, Russia, 8th May 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205251468 © IWM (Q 16729)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on May 08, 2019, 05:46:18 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Grants Pass Daily Courier, May 7, 1919.

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Wearing a target on your shirt was then, just like now, a dangerous under taking. One I could not do.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 08, 2019, 01:36:58 PM

Wearing a target on your shirt was then, just like now, a dangerous under taking. One I could not do.

There was a follow up article in the Grants Pass newspaper but I couldn't reproduce it because only the left half of the article could be seen.  The right half had been cut off.  Anyway, from what I could ascertain, the authorities were still searching for the other brother, Max Lewis, who was thought to be wounded.  Meanwhile, a third member of the gang was apprehended, one Ed Primrose, who admitted that he had a gun hidden in a newspaper while Chief of Police Gibbon was arresting him.  The bandit pulled out the gun and shot the chief two times, the bullets entering just under his heart.  It's kind of convoluted how these guys were caught, then some of them escaped, and were caught again.  I'll follow the story.  Bound to get a clearer picture during the trials.   
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 08, 2019, 01:42:27 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 8, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 08, 2019, 07:46:59 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 8, 1919.

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I read this as fresh man instead of freshman. Spicy talk! LOL
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 08, 2019, 08:29:22 PM
I read this as fresh man instead of freshman. Spicy talk! LOL

I guess we learned one thing.  Beware of freshmen with burning caps.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 09, 2019, 05:55:49 AM

Wearing a target on your shirt was then, just like now, a dangerous under taking. One I could not do.
100 years later, and some things do not change.
After watching The Highwaymenon Netflix, I ordered the book "I'm Frank Hamer: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer". The book just arrived.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 09, 2019, 11:27:31 AM
100 years later, and some things do not change.
After watching The Highwaymenon Netflix, I ordered the book "I'm Frank Hamer: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer". The book just arrived.

That sounds like a cool book.  I loved that movie.  Brilliantly filmed, especially how they kept Bonnie and Clyde just outside of the action, until the very end of the movie.  Very poetic, in an offbeat way.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 09, 2019, 01:32:22 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 9, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 09, 2019, 07:34:14 PM
100 years later, and some things do not change.
After watching The Highwaymenon Netflix, I ordered the book "I'm Frank Hamer: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer". The book just arrived.
Oh nice. I just listened to a podcast on him. Interesting man of his time- a very transitional time. Was this the book that was funded by his wife  after his death?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 09, 2019, 07:38:10 PM
@FISH Here's the podcast if you're interested:
https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/most-notorious-a-true-crime-history-podcast/e/59571802 (https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/most-notorious-a-true-crime-history-podcast/e/59571802)
The book they talk about is Texas Ranger: The Epic Life of Frank Hamer, the Man Who Killed Bonnie and Clyde by J Boessenecker.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Exile on May 10, 2019, 06:23:46 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 8, 1919.

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Jeezz!


Talk about giving yourself the coldshoulder.


 ;D
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 10, 2019, 03:45:51 PM
@FISH Here's the podcast if you're interested:
https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/most-notorious-a-true-crime-history-podcast/e/59571802 (https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/most-notorious-a-true-crime-history-podcast/e/59571802)
The book they talk about is Texas Ranger: The Epic Life of Frank Hamer, the Man Who Killed Bonnie and Clyde by J Boessenecker.
@PolkaDot , Thank you for this link. I am listening to it now. Thank you thank so much.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 10, 2019, 06:15:16 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 10, 1919.


The Grants Pass (Oregon) Daily Courier.

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The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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The Topeka State Journal.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 11, 2019, 06:03:41 PM
SOURCE | Howard Chandler Christy, Americans All! Victory Liberty Loan, circa 1919, (Boston: Forbes); Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97520325/.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 12, 2019, 01:06:04 AM
SOURCE | Howard Chandler Christy, Americans All! Victory Liberty Loan, circa 1919, (Boston: Forbes); Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97520325/.

I guess that some of the people who purchased the final Victory Liberty Loan bonds got gypped because they wanted to be payed back in gold but the government wouldn't do it.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_bond

Also, certain towns that purchased a maximum amount of the Liberty bonds were awarded a special flag.  http://www.lexingtonhistory.org/liberty-loan-flags---1918--1919.html
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 12, 2019, 01:10:49 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 12, 1919.

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Truck storage park of the American Motor Transport Corps in Brest, 12 May 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165353 © IWM (Q 69414)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 12, 2019, 08:19:42 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 12, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 13, 2019, 01:16:28 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 13, 1919.

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Wrecked Motor Launch 229 which was blown up whilst taking on petrol at Cologne, 13 May 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239424 © IWM (Q 7608)

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The wrecked Motor Launch 229 which was blown up whilst taking in petrol at Cologne. Blue Jackets clearing out the ammunition, 13 May 1919.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205239426 © IWM (Q 7610)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 13, 2019, 08:39:04 AM
@PolkaDot , Thank you for this link. I am listening to it now. Thank you thank so much.

Oh yay! What did you think @FISH ?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 13, 2019, 08:40:07 AM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 12, 1919.

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Excellent advice! LOL  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 13, 2019, 05:40:34 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 13, 1919.


The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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The Ashland Tidings.

(Here is a more detailed account of a news item that occurred earlier in the thread.)
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 14, 2019, 04:01:39 AM
Oh yay! What did you think @FISH ?
Outstanding podcast.  John Boessenecker was a great guest. I am not an expert on Bonnie and Clyde. However, I am not a beginner on this history. To my surprise, I  learned some new information.
"Most Notorious!" is on top of my list, @PolkaDot .
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 14, 2019, 04:25:19 AM
Yes, Mrs Kanitz, “Life is just a game of chance”.

As I read the clip “Walker Thought Huns Had Him”, I became curious. Why did we referred to Germans as HUNS during WW1? Back to looking up more history for me.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 14, 2019, 11:19:12 AM
Outstanding podcast.  John Boessenecker was a great guest. I am not an expert on Bonnie and Clyde. However, I am not a beginner on this history. To my surprise, I  learned some new information.
"Most Notorious!" is on top of my list, @PolkaDot .
Excellent! It's a win all around then. I have read and given as gifts several books based on interviews from this podcast. I would say about 3 out of 4 times I'm glad I did. Occasionally, the interview was better than the written book, but most of the time it has led to some great reads. The crazy thing is, Eric is not that great of an interviewer, but he knows his stuff and is able to find really great guests that can hold their own so I always enjoy the show.  :)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 14, 2019, 11:23:45 AM
Yes, Mrs Kanitz, “Life is just a game of chance”.

As I read the clip “Walker Thought Huns Had Him”, I became curious. Why did we referred to Germans as HUNS during WW1? Back to looking up more history for me.
I always thought it was because of Hungary and German occupation and all that. Did you find out the answer?

Similarly, my Grandfather had some interesting words that he used to say was "Bohemian". I didn't really understand what that meant and who the Bohemians were as a people until well into adulthood. It's interesting how we lose context was my point!  ;)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 14, 2019, 04:50:02 PM
Yes, Mrs Kanitz, “Life is just a game of chance”.

As I read the clip “Walker Thought Huns Had Him”, I became curious. Why did we referred to Germans as HUNS during WW1? Back to looking up more history for me.

WWI German soldiers were also referred to as being the Dutch and the Boche.  I used to know why, but now I've forgotten.  Also, why were the American soldiers called Doughboys?  I always thought that it was because they had ample baked good supplys like white bread, whereas the Germans had to supplement their bread with sawdust.  I guess the term goes back further than WWI, though. https://www.history.com/news/why-were-americans-who-served-in-world-war-i-called-doughboys
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 14, 2019, 05:00:37 PM
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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/173292403/henry-hallie-hornbrook
Quote
Henry Hallie Hornbrook died in a car accident, he drowned.


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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 15, 2019, 12:55:08 AM
From the Imperial War Museum, May 15, 1919.

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A scene at the high altar in Westminster Abbey. The flag-draped coffin of Edith Cavell lies in the centre of the composition with a guard of honour standing on either side. The congregation of military personnel, nurses and civilians sit with their heads bowed in prayer. In the upper half of the painting shafts of sunlight shine in through the windows illuminating the opposite wall.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/12367 © IWM (Art.IWM ART 2624)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 15, 2019, 04:20:15 AM
I always thought it was because of Hungary and German occupation and all that. Did you find out the answer?

Similarly, my Grandfather had some interesting words that he used to say was "Bohemian". I didn't really understand what that meant and who the Bohemians were as a people until well into adulthood. It's interesting how we lose context was my point!  ;)
The original Huns were a nomadic tribe, probably originating from Mongolia, under the leadership of Attila. In the early months of World War I, the allies applied the term ‘Hun’ to the forces of Germany and Austro-Hungary in order to conjure up images of a bestial foe.

BEAT BACK THE HUN WITH LIBERTY BONDS

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/25800
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 15, 2019, 04:57:15 AM
In modern use, the term "Bohemian" is applied to people who live unconventional, usually artistic, lives. Bohemians may or may not be wanderers.
@PolkaDot and @Rikki Gins , I didn't really understand how everything started to change after World War 1.
For example, the trench coat saw its rise (and was even given its name) in the desperate conditions on the front in World War I.

https://fashionhistory.fitnyc.edu/1910-1919/

1919 was the end of an era. Hold onto your hats, here comes The Roaring Twenties. A time when many people defied Prohibition, indulged in new styles of dancing and dressing, and rejected many traditional moral standards.
Yes, you are correct--It's interesting how we lose context was my point!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 15, 2019, 05:21:19 AM
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https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/173292403/henry-hallie-hornbrook

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Thank you for this amazing thread, @Rikki Gins .
I enjoy reading the news clips. My imagination runs wild.
Poor Ben Winans, the tincture of lead will destroy his mind. At least his sight was restored.
Marion County must dig deeper graves.
Henry Hallie Hornbrook died in a car accident, he drowned.
After reading about a death, you look the name up on
 https://www.findagrave.com/ ?
Dear Mrs. Thompson, you have a good sense of fashion.
Beautiful scene of the high altar in Westminster Abbey. All have their heads bowed in prayer. You don’t see that in our news stories, very often.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 15, 2019, 12:48:54 PM
Thank you for this amazing thread, @Rikki Gins .
I enjoy reading the news clips. My imagination runs wild.
Poor Ben Winans, the tincture of lead will destroy his mind. At least his sight was restored.
Marion County must dig deeper graves.
Henry Hallie Hornbrook died in a car accident, he drowned.
After reading about a death, you look the name up on
 https://www.findagrave.com/ ?
Dear Mrs. Thompson, you have a good sense of fashion.
Beautiful scene of the high altar in Westminster Abbey. All have their heads bowed in prayer. You don’t see that in our news stories, very often.

Oh @FISH, it is my pleasure to look for interesting clippings and other items from 100 years ago.  I've been doing this for years.  In fact, when I used to go to the local library I would print microfilm items out and post  them on the bulletin boards at places I was working at.  People seemed to enjoy reading them so I've been doing it ever since.  Now, thanks to @Bart Ell, I can reach a wider audience and I am grateful for that.

Yes, I have begun cross checking people's names on Find A Grave and I will use the info if it compliments their life stories. 

I enjoy reading your (and @PolkaDot's) comments on the various history bits.  Please keep them coming.

PS, I wonder what happened to Aunt Polly?  I can't seem to locate her advice column.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on May 15, 2019, 01:10:55 PM
Didn’t Aunt Polly die, allowing Hill Billy Jim to leave town on a subversive job interview?
@Walks_At_Night would know.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 15, 2019, 01:39:13 PM
Didn’t Aunt Polly die, allowing Hill Billy Jim to leave town on a subversive job interview?
@Walks_At_Night would know.

Mine did, though I don't know of a Hill Billy Jim.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Bart Ell on May 15, 2019, 04:20:37 PM
Now, thanks to @Bart Ell, I can reach a wider audience and I am grateful for that.


The pleasure is all mine.
This is a thread I read almost every morning and is the one thread that makes me wish I installed some sort of LIKE function so people could show their appreciation even when they have nothing to add.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 15, 2019, 07:36:24 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 15, 1919.


The Grants Pass Daily Courier.

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The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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The Gazette-Times.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 15, 2019, 08:11:56 PM
Didn’t Aunt Polly die, allowing Hill Billy Jim to leave town on a subversive job interview?
@Walks_At_Night would know.
+1
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 16, 2019, 02:13:34 AM
From the Library of Congress.

Some pictures from the book, Illinois in the World War; an illustrated record prepared with the cooperation and under the direction of the leaders in the state's military and civilian organizations. 1919/1920

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 16, 2019, 07:34:11 AM
From the Library of Congress.

Some pictures from the book, Illinois in the World War; an illustrated record prepared with the cooperation and under the direction of the leaders in the state's military and civilian organizations. 1919/1920

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Like
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 16, 2019, 01:36:52 PM
The pleasure is all mine.
This is a thread I read almost every morning and is the one thread that makes me wish I installed some sort of LIKE function so people could show their appreciation even when they have nothing to add.
I wanted to pull up my roots and take a wider look at EllGab.
@Bart Ell suggested for me to visit @Rikki Gins 's threads. Thank you for the suggestion.
I read this thread every day. I wish that there was a "like" or "react" feature.  ::)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 16, 2019, 01:55:33 PM
From the Library of Congress, May 15, 1919.


The Grants Pass Daily Courier.

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The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram.

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The Gazette-Times.

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I was born with an interest in history. Every day, I read your postings. Sometimes, I repeat your stories to other people in the real world. “100 years ago” is a very clever idea. Your former coworker must have enjoyed your clippings on the bulletin board. How did you come up with this idea?
With hope, Aunt Polly will be be found.
Back to history—I don’t blame Ross for “telling”. As Ross said “but a fellow who’d sell ran kpoison like that stuff was, ought to be arrested anyway".
I feel so sorry for the RED who raised this wild calf.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 16, 2019, 02:34:22 PM
Like

Thank you, @anniem.  I'm glad.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 16, 2019, 03:05:59 PM
I was born with an interest in history. Every day, I read your postings. Sometimes, I repeat your stories to other people in the real world. “100 years ago” is a very clever idea. Your former coworker must have enjoyed your clippings on the bulletin board. How did you come up with this idea?
With hope, Aunt Polly will be be found.
Back to history—I don’t blame Ross for “telling”. As Ross said “but a fellow who’d sell ran kpoison like that stuff was, ought to be arrested anyway".
I feel so sorry for the RED who raised this wild calf.

Hi @FISH.  A deep interest in WWI plus three great uncles who fought in it, were the geneses of the 100 years ago column.  Why such interest in a horrible war?  Well, perhaps it was because I knew absolutely nothing about it, to begin with.  But the more I studied it, the more I became fascinated with it.  Family history played a part too.  As mentioned, I had three great uncles who fought in WWI.  Anyway, I started printing microfilm newspaper articles from the local library (this was before home computers) and that is where the clippings began to appear on the bulletin boards.  After that, I became more interested in the societal aspects of that time and by then, WWI was exactly 100 years ago and the rest, as they, is history.     
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 16, 2019, 04:33:53 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 16, 1919.

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(https://ellgab.com/index.php?topic=96.msg188222#msg188222)
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 16, 2019, 05:25:47 PM
Thank you, @anniem.  I'm glad.

Really appreciate your efforts. I read this thread everyday. I 1+ you too, but don't often mention when I do that to people. I did like Bart's idea about Like, so I'll do that now and then. Oh, for today's articles....

Like
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 16, 2019, 08:03:07 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 16, 1919.

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(https://ellgab.com/index.php?topic=96.msg188222#msg188222)
Muncie has a big boy on their hands! Must be a smaller draft of some kind? So strange that they gave all the weights and dimensions but didn't say who, what, or how! I guessing the headline was: Big Horse, Little Hole.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 16, 2019, 08:04:05 PM
Next Question: What is Black Bread?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 16, 2019, 08:30:14 PM
Next Question: What is Black Bread?

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 16, 2019, 08:51:45 PM
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Those German Bastards!!!!
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 17, 2019, 01:39:42 AM
Next Question: What is Black Bread?

Here is a recipe for German Black Bread, though I'm pretty sure that it isn't the same as the WWI black bread.  (I have a number of books on British and American prisoners of war during WWI and they were served the black bread.  They said that the bread had sawdust for filler and was hard as a brick.  Some of them would crack a tooth while trying to eat the bread.)

https://recipeland.com/recipe/v/german-black-bread-41218  (This bread has some nice ingredients in it.  I bet it is pretty tasty.) 
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 17, 2019, 01:52:05 AM
Muncie has a big boy on their hands! Must be a smaller draft of some kind? So strange that they gave all the weights and dimensions but didn't say who, what, or how! I guessing the headline was: Big Horse, Little Hole.

Also, what was a 1,600 pound horse doing in the upper floor of a local clothing store?  Shopping for a new harness?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 17, 2019, 02:05:37 AM
From the Library of Congress.  Image from page 1121 of "Hardware Merchandising," March-June 1919.

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Quote
1900 Agitator Electric Washer. Is there a live 1900 Dealer in your district? Would you like to know more about the 1900 line? If there is no one selling 1900 Washers in your territory there is a chance for you. Make use of it by writing to-day to the Wholesale Department. THE 1900 WASHER COMPANY 357 YONGE STREET TORONTO.
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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 17, 2019, 05:05:34 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 17, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Walks_At_Night on May 17, 2019, 05:23:17 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 17, 1919.

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Mrs. Thompson needs a visit from Everett True.  Perhaps then she would take her gig a little more seriously.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 17, 2019, 07:19:47 PM
Mrs. Thompson needs a visit from Everett True.  Perhaps then she would take her gig a little more seriously.

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Ha.  That's a very nice illustration of Ev there, Walks.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 18, 2019, 08:01:19 AM
Hi @FISH.  A deep interest in WWI plus three great uncles who fought in it, were the geneses of the 100 years ago column.  Why such interest in a horrible war?  Well, perhaps it was because I knew absolutely nothing about it, to begin with.  But the more I studied it, the more I became fascinated with it.  Family history played a part too.  As mentioned, I had three great uncles who fought in WWI.  Anyway, I started printing microfilm newspaper articles from the local library (this was before home computers) and that is where the clippings began to appear on the bulletin boards.  After that, I became more interested in the societal aspects of that time and by then, WWI was exactly 100 years ago and the rest, as they, is history.     
@Rikki Gins --Same here, I knew nothing about WW 1.  I always admired the beautiful statue of a WWI soldier or “dough boy” in my city.   Funny thing about our statue, this “dough boy” has been moved to 3 different locations during my life time. Our WW1 “soldier” continues to move to less prominent locations. This cast bronze statue is one of dozens of memorials produced in the 1920s by sculptor John Paulding. Our statue is titled “Over the Top.”

 I am a volunteer with a local Veterans group. I am learning about our current war stories. As I worked on my family tree, I learned that it was NOT my great Uncle Ed who served in WW 1 but, but his brother, Andrew. My older brother would say to me “Don’t you remember Uncle Ed? He had the shakes because he was exposed to the mustard gas”. As per the USA Veteran’s information, Uncle Andrew was a “Horse Shoer” Branch: Army, Troop L, 2nd Cal. Uncle Andrew served from May 1917 to July 1919. He entered the Service at the age of 26. Discharged at the age of 28.  Married at the age of 36 years old. He passed over at the age of 57 years old.

As I worked on Mr. Fish’s family tree, I discovered that his great Uncle Tom had served in the Champagne-Marne Offensive, July 1918. He was one of the few soldiers who survived. He was one of the "Men of Iron.” No one in Uncle Tom’s current family realized that “Great Uncle Tom” was a man of “Iron”. He entered the Service at the age of 17 years old. He served from August 1917 to May 1919. He was “gassed” on August 8th, 1919. He returned home, never married and died at the age of 46 years old. He had nine siblings.

As you can see, I have been learning about WW 1, so your thread is part of my learning and understanding our history… and the rest, as they say, is history.   

Photo: Men of Iron by Don Troiani
https://laststandonzombieisland.com/tag/history-art-don-troiani-us-army-military-war-military-history-ww1-wwi-ww-1-ww-i-world-war-i-world-war-1-world-war-one-first-world-war-great-war-the-great-war-1910s-battle-of-st-mihiel-hundred-days-wes/
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 18, 2019, 08:38:09 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee., May 18, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 18, 2019, 09:39:38 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Omaha Daily Bee., May 18, 1919.

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LOL
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 20, 2019, 03:52:08 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 20, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on May 20, 2019, 04:23:43 PM
Subjects which tire the men.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 20, 2019, 05:43:08 PM
Dear Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson,
My husband insisted that I remain silent during our dinner hour. He finds me more attractive if I display less energy. He insist that I act like a languid woman. Almost as if I was kind of lazy in my mind. I thought that the languid women has gone out of style.  Please give me some advice?
JC
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: PolkaDot on May 20, 2019, 06:03:56 PM
Subjects which tire the men.
All of them?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 20, 2019, 06:07:44 PM
I can't help but wonder...was Mr. Bailey so lost in thought over his crops that he thought the car had come to a complete stop?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 21, 2019, 04:40:46 AM
I can't help but wonder...was Mr. Bailey so lost in thought over his crops that he thought the car had come to a complete stop?
We will never know why Mr. Bailey attempted to dismount the moving machine before it stopped.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 21, 2019, 01:28:19 PM
We will never know why Mr. Bailey attempted to dismount the moving machine before it stopped.

Andrew must have been a prominent farmer indeed.  He was able to afford a nice family plot: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/80361804/andrew-bailey
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 21, 2019, 02:00:21 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 21, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: anniem on May 21, 2019, 02:35:18 PM
Like
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 22, 2019, 06:35:29 AM
OHIO NEWS FLASH.
Mrs. Anna McConaha had the gift of seeing the future.
Mrs. and Mr. Lechner may need to be hypnotized. They both need to improve their abilities to recall events from that bad night.
Thank goodness all the lovey spinsters have Mrs. Thompson to turn to in their time of need. I wonder if Mrs. Thompson is a male or a female.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: juan on May 22, 2019, 08:34:20 AM
What could Mabel possibly do?
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 22, 2019, 04:24:19 PM
From the Library of Congress.  The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram., May 22, 1919.

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Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: FISH on May 23, 2019, 05:01:56 AM
@Rikki Gins , what a group of clippings. Strange, funny and confusing stories.
82 year old Granny dies and almost falls into her grandson’s grave.
Order of the Owls has some violent critics.
I wonder if George Seifert was able to enjoy a meal after the sewing of his intestines.
What the “shimmy” is going to be barred?
Sounds like Agnes Grimes did not like her husband. I want to know how much did Fred Grimes weigh at the time of their divorce.
Title: Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
Post by: Rikki Gins on May 23, 2019, 12:13:36 PM
@Rikki Gins , what a group of clippings. Strange, funny and confusing stories.
82 year old Granny dies and almost falls into her grandson’s grave.
Order of the Owls has some violent critics.
I wonder if George Seifert was able to enjoy a meal after the sewing of his intestines.
What the “shimmy” is going to be barred?
Sounds like Agnes Grimes did not like her husband. I want to know how much did Fred Grimes weigh at the time of their divorce.

Yes, there were some good ones, @FISH.  I searched around for more info on George Seifert and I think I may have hit on what happened to him.  If he is the same Geor