Author Topic: The Good Old Days?  (Read 204 times)

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PB

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2019, 04:29:24 PM »
...  In addition, COMMON COURTESY has wilted away...

Not only common curtsey, but pride in doing one's job.  Now it's rudeness and taking advantage.

People used to be reluctant to take handouts.  Now half the population is on the dole in one way or another.  Look at all the handicap license plates - no way are that many people ''differently abled'', it's mostly again just people taking advantage

 

BartEllProducer

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2019, 08:07:44 PM »
I couldn't agree more. Unfortunately, they're rebooting that show too.

Damn Hollywood dingbat’s. Another example of why pre 9/11 was a better time and place.

Nucky Nolan

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #17 on: Today at 03:36:30 PM »
I think most people are comfortable with their surrounding and society in general from when they were growing up.  There is constant change, some good some bad, and people need to adjust to it - some are better at doing that than others, some don't care for it at all.

I saw a piece on-line from our local paper about the various restaurants, venues, bars, and local semi-celebrates that have been lost recently.  But in that same time frame there were new restaurants, bars, venues, etc that started up - they aren't long time favorites now, but some may be in the future.  There are always new entertainers and others coming along as well.

No matter how appealing any particular time or place in the past was, I wouldn't want to return if there was no internet.  Not to mention modern communications, pharmaceuticals, safer more efficient cars, cleaner air and water, healthier food choices, on and on.

Gradual change is fine. People are often disturbed or upset by abrupt and drastic changes, though. This is true on the macro level as well as the micro level. Some societal changes are the equivalents of unexpected car crashes. They're shocks to our systems. We can't adequately plan or prepare for them because they take us by surprise. They're certainly not what we expected. We get George Orwell instead of George Jetson.

Someone could start a new thread about closed or closing stores and other venues. We just lost Kmart, as well as Sears. Granted, the head honcho is responsible for this, but it's sad to see them go. JC Penney, the second anchor store at our local mall, must be whistling past the graveyard. Speaking of malls, I went to our local one on a weekend. It looked like a Wednesday morning in the '90s. All of my fave shops were gone, replaced by cell phone stores and clothing stores. As far as I'm concerned, the proverbial fat lady sang when they closed Spencer's Gifts.   

Robert

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #18 on: Today at 03:39:35 PM »
I think that most of us here are Baby Boomers or Generation X. It often seems like the past was much better than the present. I realize that older generations always think this way, but I wonder if the idea has merit beyond this phenomenon. I even hear people, under 30, say that life was much better before 9/11, so do you share their views?
No.  Generally they value much more highly than I do certain aspects of society and have a misleadingly narrow set of experiences and knowledge that lead them to think this way.  Plus they're wrong about certain causes and effects in economics and other spheres.

I could find a thing or two that I place a lot of value on that have gotten worse.  Overall, though, I couldn't find a stretch going backwards from the choice of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 or 60 years where on the other end things were better overall.

Robert

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #19 on: Today at 03:41:49 PM »
COMMON SENSE! Where the fuck is common sense these days?
It's as prevalent as always, but never gets much publicity, because it is common sense.  Why pay attention to what's common?

Robert

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #20 on: Today at 03:43:25 PM »
Pre 9/11 was much better. A lot of things changed that day.
Yes, but overall 2009 was still better than 1999.

Nucky Nolan

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #21 on: Today at 03:47:16 PM »
My mom watched his shows when he was fat and old.  We had much better music than the Elvis of his last decade and a half, so seeing that no one was interested in looking into his earlier stuff.  But people did like the 50s music (for example Happy Days was pretty popular).  They liked Lawrence Welk enough to support a show.

The thing about the last 40 years of music is it mostly sucked, and got worse by the year.  There is very little good music being made now that makes it's way into the popular culture.  Hasn't been for a long time.  No wonder music and bands from decades ago are still popular.

My point was that Generation X liked '80s music and '90s music, and they almost never said that they preferred the era of Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. That's not the case now. Many Millennials, as well as Generation Z kids, prefer '80s music to their generations' music. You read posts from high school kids, who sound like they're older people having midlife crises, when they complain about today's music.

Robert

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #22 on: Today at 03:49:33 PM »
No wonder music and bands from decades ago are still popular.
Decades only?  Centuries if you leave the bands part out of it.

But isn't that to be expected since we have recording -- both sheet music and sound?  In any given year or decade, how much is added to the total?  Couldn't be that big a fraction.  Why would we expect much of it to be popular when all that music from the past never goes away?

Nucky Nolan

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #23 on: Today at 03:49:37 PM »
Damn Hollywood dingbat’s. Another example of why pre 9/11 was a better time and place.

Well, we had bad movies based on good TV shows. Do you remember the Cannes sensation, "The Beverly Hillbillies"?

Nucky Nolan

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #24 on: Today at 03:56:42 PM »
No.  Generally they value much more highly than I do certain aspects of society and have a misleadingly narrow set of experiences and knowledge that lead them to think this way.  Plus they're wrong about certain causes and effects in economics and other spheres.

I could find a thing or two that I place a lot of value on that have gotten worse.  Overall, though, I couldn't find a stretch going backwards from the choice of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 or 60 years where on the other end things were better overall.

It's true that they weren't alive then. That said, both older people and younger people prefer the good old days. I can see why, because our society indeed was better in many ways back then. You realize this when you see an old woman, in a wheelchair, frisked by an overzealous security guard in a public airport.

Nucky Nolan

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #25 on: Today at 04:05:31 PM »
Decades only?  Centuries if you leave the bands part out of it.

But isn't that to be expected since we have recording -- both sheet music and sound?  In any given year or decade, how much is added to the total?  Couldn't be that big a fraction.  Why would we expect much of it to be popular when all that music from the past never goes away?

PB means that many kids like past music, like classic rock, more than present music. My guess is that a large percentage aren't huge classical fans.

PB

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Re: The Good Old Days?
« Reply #26 on: Today at 05:54:31 PM »
Decades only?  Centuries if you leave the bands part out of it.

But isn't that to be expected since we have recording -- both sheet music and sound?  In any given year or decade, how much is added to the total?  Couldn't be that big a fraction.  Why would we expect much of it to be popular when all that music from the past never goes away?

The same could be said of books and other things as well.  It's great that we have all that, but we need to keep creating, innovating, etc, each point in time making it's own mark, otherwise we have stagnation.

Also, there's something to be said for a band out playing their own music.