Author Topic: The EllGab Garden  (Read 8043 times)

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #225 on: April 11, 2019, 12:51:56 AM »
I believe you are correct (right). These are forget-me-nots-"Myosotidium". This was my Mom's favorite flower. Her wedding band was engraved with forget-me-nots.

Oh that sounds like a totally beautiful wedding band, Fish.

Rikki Gins

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #226 on: April 11, 2019, 01:17:06 AM »
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A postcard image of a Myrtle tree.  These are pretty cool trees.  There is a river on the Oregon coast that flows into the ocean, and growing on the bank of that river are nothing but Myrtle trees.  It might be the Umpqua River, but I'm not quite sure.  It was so many years ago that I was there.  Actually it was a full fledged park full of Myrtle trees, I do remember that.  I think it is by the town of Brookings.  (All of the tourist shops sold bowls and salt and pepper shakers made out of Myrtle wood.) 

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #227 on: April 11, 2019, 09:40:32 AM »
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A postcard image of a Myrtle tree.  These are pretty cool trees.  There is a river on the Oregon coast that flows into the ocean, and growing on the bank of that river are nothing but Myrtle trees.  It might be the Umpqua River, but I'm not quite sure.  It was so many years ago that I was there.  Actually it was a full fledged park full of Myrtle trees, I do remember that.  I think it is by the town of Brookings.  (All of the tourist shops sold bowls and salt and pepper shakers made out of Myrtle wood.)

Do these flower? I know the crepe myrtle does.

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #228 on: April 12, 2019, 02:34:34 PM »
Do these flower? I know the crepe myrtle does.

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Yes, the myrtle trees do flower.  Not too brightly in the wild, but cultivars have nice, creamy white flowers once a year.  The leaves of the tree are very pungent and have a strong pepper like fragrance. (If people with sensitive skin crush the leaves in their hands, they might get a rash.)  The leaves stay on the tree all year long.  Aside from over there in the holey land, true myrtle trees only grow on the pacific coast in Northern California and Southern Oregon.  But what am I flapping my gums for? ha.  Here is a handy link with info on the myrtle tree: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/myrtle-tree-43276.html     

Rikki Gins

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #229 on: April 12, 2019, 04:52:03 PM »
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This EllGab Garden postcard might be showing something that some of you have on your estates...a rock garden.  in particular, a rock garden that is exhibiting early season blooms, what with the tulips and all.

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Dear Mae,

Isn't this picture just like Maine now???  We are enjoying ourselves.  The weather has been warm and plenty of sunshine.  Had a nice visit with Gertrude and Jane.  They both look right in the pink. 
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From Wiki, March 14, 1967:
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The body of U.S. President John F. Kennedy was moved, along with the bodies of two of his children who died in infancy, to a permanent burial place at Arlington National Cemetery, 20 feet from the site where he had been laid to rest on November 25, 1963.

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #230 on: April 13, 2019, 09:33:13 AM »
Yes, the myrtle trees do flower.  Not too brightly in the wild, but cultivars have nice, creamy white flowers once a year.  The leaves of the tree are very pungent and have a strong pepper like fragrance. (If people with sensitive skin crush the leaves in their hands, they might get a rash.)  The leaves stay on the tree all year long.  Aside from over there in the holey land, true myrtle trees only grow on the pacific coast in Northern California and Southern Oregon.  But what am I flapping my gums for? ha.  Here is a handy link with info on the myrtle tree: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/myrtle-tree-43276.html   

TY Rikki, I recall the southern variant as being particularly showy in blossom. Tis that time of the year!

And, staying in the overall family, how about the gorgeous Texas Laurel?

https://guzmansgreenhouse.com/the-texas-mountain-laurel-tree/

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These things smell like a freshly uncapped bottle of grape soda!

albrecht

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #231 on: April 13, 2019, 10:07:25 AM »
TY Rikki, I recall the southern variant as being particularly showy in blossom. Tis that time of the year!

And, staying in the overall family, how about the gorgeous Texas Laurel?

https://guzmansgreenhouse.com/the-texas-mountain-laurel-tree/

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These things smell like a freshly uncapped bottle of grape soda!

Mountain Laurels are awesome and don't need much water at all once established and will grow in rocky or caliche without problems. And the blooms do have that smell.

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #232 on: April 13, 2019, 10:57:45 AM »
I find it one of the most evocative and lovely trees out there, and you're right about low water usage too.

Another boffo one for warmer climes is the Jacaranda:

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https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/jacaranda/jacaranda-tree-information.htm

Growing jacaranda trees is mostly a matter of having the right environment, as they’re strictly southern trees that thrive in Florida and parts of (Arizona & Nevada) Texas and California. Gardeners living further north often have success growing jacaranda as a large houseplant, and they have been known to make spectacular bonsai specimens. Jacaranda Tree Information Jacarandas are true southern trees, thriving in USDA plant hardiness zones 9b through 11. Jacaranda tree hardiness is tested when the temperature drops below 15 F. (-9 C.), and they do best above the freezing point. They prefer a sandy soil with great drainage, and show off their lavender blooms best when planted in full sun. They grow relatively fast and will get up to 60 feet tall and just as wide. The spreading branches may fill your entire front yard.


PolkaDot

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #233 on: April 13, 2019, 01:06:45 PM »
I find it one of the most evocative and lovely trees out there, and you're right about low water usage too.

Another boffo one for warmer climes is the Jacaranda:

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https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/jacaranda/jacaranda-tree-information.htm

Growing jacaranda trees is mostly a matter of having the right environment, as they’re strictly southern trees that thrive in Florida and parts of (Arizona & Nevada) Texas and California. Gardeners living further north often have success growing jacaranda as a large houseplant, and they have been known to make spectacular bonsai specimens. Jacaranda Tree Information Jacarandas are true southern trees, thriving in USDA plant hardiness zones 9b through 11. Jacaranda tree hardiness is tested when the temperature drops below 15 F. (-9 C.), and they do best above the freezing point. They prefer a sandy soil with great drainage, and show off their lavender blooms best when planted in full sun. They grow relatively fast and will get up to 60 feet tall and just as wide. The spreading branches may fill your entire front yard.


When I saw the mtn laurel pic I thought it was a jacaranda. There are Jacaranda’s in Upcountry Maui. That’s the only place I’ve ever seen them, so this is interesting. Thanks!
There was a little girl,
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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #234 on: April 13, 2019, 01:36:16 PM »
Wow, in that climate I bet they are massive and thriving, who knows, perhaps that's where my pic was taken.

Moar:

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #235 on: April 13, 2019, 01:41:09 PM »
...and while we're at it, how about the red Jacaranda tree:

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #236 on: April 13, 2019, 01:42:08 PM »
...yellow Jacaranda too:

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albrecht

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #237 on: April 13, 2019, 02:53:08 PM »
I find it one of the most evocative and lovely trees out there, and you're right about low water usage too.

Another boffo one for warmer climes is the Jacaranda:

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https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/jacaranda/jacaranda-tree-information.htm

Growing jacaranda trees is mostly a matter of having the right environment, as they’re strictly southern trees that thrive in Florida and parts of (Arizona & Nevada) Texas and California. Gardeners living further north often have success growing jacaranda as a large houseplant, and they have been known to make spectacular bonsai specimens. Jacaranda Tree Information Jacarandas are true southern trees, thriving in USDA plant hardiness zones 9b through 11. Jacaranda tree hardiness is tested when the temperature drops below 15 F. (-9 C.), and they do best above the freezing point. They prefer a sandy soil with great drainage, and show off their lavender blooms best when planted in full sun. They grow relatively fast and will get up to 60 feet tall and just as wide. The spreading branches may fill your entire front yard.


It is so weird how things go. I planted a bunch of Mountain Laurels years ago. In succession. One got yuuuge. One did normal. And one was spindly and then taken out by Harvey. But the odd thing is the huge one had less light but close to roof so got more rainwater, I guess. Strange because I've had some in the back in basically limestone/rock/caliche that I never water (naturally there) and even seen them growing on the cliff in full sun and not much water.  Neighbor grows them from seed but they grow slow, at first. You need to scratch the seed (once you open the pod.) I've done some randomly when I see them and several have grown. No effort I scratched them up and put them in the holes left from Cicadas. But it worked. 

One odd thing. Tenacity of plants. I hate to kill them. But I have a Pecan tree right by foundation so worried (even though their roots go deep and not out) and cut it down every year....but every year comes back. Amazing. How it can have enough energy to keep coming back?

Jacarandas looks good. Builders should use them instead of the Bradford Pears so loved (since quick growth) because those Pears are short lived and always split apart etc (if not really taken care of) in a storm or just due to age. But they grow quick and flower so used a lot.

Rikki Gins

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #238 on: April 13, 2019, 03:13:56 PM »
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Another early blooming spring flower, the Anemone.  Also, as noted, the state flower of South Dakota.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anemone
 

FISH

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Re: The EllGab Garden
« Reply #239 on: April 19, 2019, 05:08:15 AM »
“April’s full moon is called the Full Pink Moon, heralding the appearance of the 'moss pink,' or wild ground phlox – one of the first spring flowers,” the Old Farmer’s Almanac reported.
According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, April’s “Pink Moon” is set to light up the sky on Friday, April 19, around 7:12 a.m. EST.