Author Topic: The Postcard Thread  (Read 47977 times)

0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

SpookPumpkin

  • Proud Pumpkin Lady
  • Ellevated
  • *******
  • Posts: 10271
  • Karma: 3777
  • I'm not an actual pumpkin...or am I?!
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #525 on: October 23, 2018, 10:52:09 PM »
There is sometimes an odd phenomena where bitter, or even rude, staff is a plus. An odd thing but the old embittered waitress, the ornery bartender, the short-fused cook, etc oddly endears people to some places. Weird thing. Maybe a reverse psychology? If you don't get 'the treatment' a bonus? Or fun or watching other get it? Usually places that have been around a long time. Sadly, at least here, that kind of service is gone, since turn-over of staff, old places gone, and "progress."

Mr. Spookcat told me on a trip to Chicago once, there was (is?) a popular pizza place where the staff are rude. It's some sort of entertainment thing. They asked what his friend wanted to drink, and when he replied "water", they came back with "You know it comes from the Lake, right? You want lake water? It's disgusting!"
Time spent with pumpkins is never wasted.

Rikki Gins

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Karma: 2071
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #526 on: October 24, 2018, 04:54:53 PM »
Mr. Spookcat told me on a trip to Chicago once, there was (is?) a popular pizza place where the staff are rude. It's some sort of entertainment thing. They asked what his friend wanted to drink, and when he replied "water", they came back with "You know it comes from the Lake, right? You want lake water? It's disgusting!"

I read about a famous deli place in New York where if you asked for ketchup, the owner would throw a fit and castigate you.  All for entertainments sake and a person is supposed to laugh about it but I take that kind of stuff seriously and would probably have given the guy a knuckle sandwich...with ketchup.

Rikki Gins

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Karma: 2071
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #527 on: October 24, 2018, 05:31:17 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


I'm not a graphic artist but the drawing on this postcard doesn't look early 1900's to me.  More like the 1930's or 40's.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


But the postcard doesn't lie.  There is a nice postal cancellation date of August 19, 1907 on the back, making this card one of the oldest in my collection.  If you look close you can see some faded pencil scratchings that tell us that the card was mailed to Mrs. W.H. Burghardt in Salem, Oregon.  The cancellation stamp shows that the card was sent from Newport, Oregon.  Hmmmm, it looks like there was a Burghardt Law Publishing Company in Salem: https://publishers.lawin.org/wh-burghardt-company/ 

SpookPumpkin

  • Proud Pumpkin Lady
  • Ellevated
  • *******
  • Posts: 10271
  • Karma: 3777
  • I'm not an actual pumpkin...or am I?!
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #528 on: October 24, 2018, 05:52:06 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


I'm not a graphic artist but the drawing on this postcard doesn't look early 1900's to me.  More like the 1930's or 40's.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


But the postcard doesn't lie.  There is a nice postal cancellation date of August 19, 1907 on the back, making this card one of the oldest in my collection.  If you look close you can see some faded pencil scratchings that tell us that the card was mailed to Mrs. W.H. Burghardt in Salem, Oregon.  The cancellation stamp shows that the card was sent from Newport, Oregon.  Hmmmm, it looks like there was a Burghardt Law Publishing Company in Salem: https://publishers.lawin.org/wh-burghardt-company/
Hope you don't mind, Rikki, I noticed the "H.H Tammen" at the bottom.

"More about H.H. Tammen (1856-1924)
A maker of souvenirs in the west, based in Denver. They specialized in rodeo, National Park and western items. Harry Heye Tammen was born in Baltimore, Maryland on March 6, 1856, the son of a German immigrant pharmacist. He attended Knapps Academy in Baltimore, then worked in Philadelphia before moving to Denver in 1880. With his partner Charles A. Stuart he worked as a Denver bartender in 1880, and in 1881 they established the firm of H.H. Tammen & Co. (aka H.H. Tammen Curio Co.) in Denver, Colorado. The company focused on creating souvenir mineralogical curiosities of Colorado, but also sold photography (including William Henry Jackson), silver souvenir spoons, and the like. In 1895, Tammen became a co-editor of the Denver Post, and thus even more wealthy than he already had become. He was apparently behind the controversial decision of Buffalo Bill’s family, to bury him in Denver instead of his hometown of Cody, Wyoming. The H.H. Tammen Curio Co. was in business until 1953, and possibly as late as 1962."
Time spent with pumpkins is never wasted.

PB

  • Elluminati
  • ******
  • Posts: 1770
  • Karma: 499
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #529 on: October 24, 2018, 05:55:34 PM »
I read about a famous deli place in New York where if you asked for ketchup, the owner would throw a fit and castigate you.  All for entertainments sake and a person is supposed to laugh about it but I take that kind of stuff seriously and would probably have given the guy a knuckle sandwich...with ketchup.

How about the places that prohibit ties, and anyone who comes in with one gets it cut off and added to the wall or rafter as another trophy.  Dang, some of things things are expensive

SpookPumpkin

  • Proud Pumpkin Lady
  • Ellevated
  • *******
  • Posts: 10271
  • Karma: 3777
  • I'm not an actual pumpkin...or am I?!
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #530 on: October 24, 2018, 05:58:49 PM »
How about the places that prohibit ties, and anyone who comes in with one gets it cut off and added to the wall or rafter as another trophy.  Dang, some of things things are expensive

Yikes! Do they at least warn you first?
Time spent with pumpkins is never wasted.

albrecht

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 2826
  • Karma: 500
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #531 on: October 24, 2018, 06:22:46 PM »
How about the places that prohibit ties, and anyone who comes in with one gets it cut off and added to the wall or rafter as another trophy.  Dang, some of things things are expensive
Yeah, that steakhouse in Pheonix comes to mind. There also is an odd tradition in Brabant, part of Germany, and part of Flanders during carnival girls cut off guys ties and kiss them and, sort of, "take over." Of course, now #metoo is trying to put an end to this and the traditional dances etc. (I won't go into the politics of this or the behavior of migrants during carnival.  I have no idea of the cutting of ties in certain restuarants is related to the carnival practice. The first place I saw it was in Phoenix. And I figured they just wanted you to buy bolo ties ala neo-western look.

https://www.dw.com/en/a-kiss-for-your-tie-why-carnival-kicks-off-with-gender-power-games/a-19022057

albrecht

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 2826
  • Karma: 500
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #532 on: October 24, 2018, 06:27:52 PM »
Hope you don't mind, Rikki, I noticed the "H.H Tammen" at the bottom.

"More about H.H. Tammen (1856-1924)
A maker of souvenirs in the west, based in Denver. They specialized in rodeo, National Park and western items. Harry Heye Tammen was born in Baltimore, Maryland on March 6, 1856, the son of a German immigrant pharmacist. He attended Knapps Academy in Baltimore, then worked in Philadelphia before moving to Denver in 1880. With his partner Charles A. Stuart he worked as a Denver bartender in 1880, and in 1881 they established the firm of H.H. Tammen & Co. (aka H.H. Tammen Curio Co.) in Denver, Colorado. The company focused on creating souvenir mineralogical curiosities of Colorado, but also sold photography (including William Henry Jackson), silver souvenir spoons, and the like. In 1895, Tammen became a co-editor of the Denver Post, and thus even more wealthy than he already had become. He was apparently behind the controversial decision of Buffalo Bill’s family, to bury him in Denver instead of his hometown of Cody, Wyoming. The H.H. Tammen Curio Co. was in business until 1953, and possibly as late as 1962."

Nice. To hear more about old companies and people and how long the businesses lasted. Mr.Tammen seems to have done quite well and profited from the "go West, young man" and the "let's go to America" ideas.
 
"Cody died on January 10, 1917. He was baptized in the Catholic Church the day before his death by Father Christopher Walsh, of the Denver Cathedral.  He received a full Masonic funeral.  Upon the news of Cody's death, tributes were made by George V, Kaiser Wilhelm II, and President Woodrow Wilson.  His funeral service was held at the Elks Lodge Hall in Denver. The governor of Wyoming, John B. Kendrick, a friend of Cody's, led the funeral procession to the cemetery.
Cody's grave in 1927"

 If Buffalo Bill died today C2C, and other shows, would have vast conspiracies about him or his death!!

PB

  • Elluminati
  • ******
  • Posts: 1770
  • Karma: 499
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #533 on: October 24, 2018, 07:29:28 PM »
Yikes! Do they at least warn you first?

Just the sign, ignore that and you're on your own - wearing the stub of what left I guess.

SpookPumpkin

  • Proud Pumpkin Lady
  • Ellevated
  • *******
  • Posts: 10271
  • Karma: 3777
  • I'm not an actual pumpkin...or am I?!
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #534 on: October 25, 2018, 03:06:48 AM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


visitors can't see pics , please register or login


visitors can't see pics , please register or login

Time spent with pumpkins is never wasted.

Rikki Gins

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Karma: 2071
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #535 on: October 25, 2018, 03:27:48 AM »
Hope you don't mind, Rikki, I noticed the "H.H Tammen" at the bottom.

"More about H.H. Tammen (1856-1924)
A maker of souvenirs in the west, based in Denver. They specialized in rodeo, National Park and western items. Harry Heye Tammen was born in Baltimore, Maryland on March 6, 1856, the son of a German immigrant pharmacist. He attended Knapps Academy in Baltimore, then worked in Philadelphia before moving to Denver in 1880. With his partner Charles A. Stuart he worked as a Denver bartender in 1880, and in 1881 they established the firm of H.H. Tammen & Co. (aka H.H. Tammen Curio Co.) in Denver, Colorado. The company focused on creating souvenir mineralogical curiosities of Colorado, but also sold photography (including William Henry Jackson), silver souvenir spoons, and the like. In 1895, Tammen became a co-editor of the Denver Post, and thus even more wealthy than he already had become. He was apparently behind the controversial decision of Buffalo Bill’s family, to bury him in Denver instead of his hometown of Cody, Wyoming. The H.H. Tammen Curio Co. was in business until 1953, and possibly as late as 1962."

I don't mind at all, dear spookcat.  I encourage all postcard readers to dig in and find 'the rest of the story' when perusing these old postcards.  Just so you know, I will occasionally leave out certain items that can be researched, such as people's names and addresses.  In this case you came up with some sterling info on Mr. Tammen.  Great work.  I'm very proud of you. Also, thank you so very much for the nice Halloween postcards!

Rikki Gins

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Karma: 2071
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #536 on: October 26, 2018, 07:33:26 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


Here is an old postcard showing the Southern Pacific railroad depot at Monroe, Oregon.  If you look to the far right, where that bush or tree is, well, that marks the backyard area of my grandparent's back yard.  Yes, their house was that close to the depot.  I would guess that the photo was taken somewhere back in the 1930's or 40's because that side room sticking out was removed somewhere along the line.  Oddly, it looks as though the building is in a complete state of disrepair and indeed it might have been.  The building was obviously renovated because it was in pretty good shape when my older brothers and I played there back in the late 1950's.  (Imagine, just walking past your own backyard and then on up to a bonified train depot.)

Lots of fond memories there.  The depot was busy.  Lots of train traffic, and yet there were times when nothing was going on and we would play on some big wooden loading ramps and such.  Eventually, the depot was no longer needed and it was moved on down the street a ways.  The last I heard, the people of Monroe were hoping to find a historical use for it.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login
 

This empty lot is all that remains of my grandparent's house.  You can see how close it was to the depot which would have been where that pesticide operation currently sits.


visitors can't see pics , please register or login


The depot was moved down the street to this temporary lot but I'm not sure if it is still there or not.  These Google Earth pics can be rather old and I think that this one is at least four or five years old.

albrecht

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 2826
  • Karma: 500
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #537 on: October 26, 2018, 07:57:25 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


Here is an old postcard showing the Southern Pacific railroad depot at Monroe, Oregon.  If you look to the far right, where that bush or tree is, well, that marks the backyard area of my grandparent's back yard.  Yes, their house was that close to the depot.  I would guess that the photo was taken somewhere back in the 1930's or 40's because that side room sticking out was removed somewhere along the line.  Oddly, it looks as though the building is in a complete state of disrepair and indeed it might have been.  The building was obviously renovated because it was in pretty good shape when my older brothers and I played there back in the late 1950's.  (Imagine, just walking past your own backyard and then on up to a bonified train depot.)

Lots of fond memories there.  The depot was busy.  Lots of train traffic, and yet there were times when nothing was going on and we would play on some big wooden loading ramps and such.  Eventually, the depot was no longer needed and it was moved on down the street a ways.  The last I heard, the people of Monroe were hoping to find a historical use for it.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login
 

This empty lot is all that remains of my grandparent's house.  You can see how close it was to the depot which would have been where that pesticide operation currently sits.


visitors can't see pics , please register or login


The depot was moved down the street to this temporary lot but I'm not sure if it is still there or not.  These Google Earth pics can be rather old and I think that this one is at least four or five years old.
Awesome and cool. A fun stories. Train kept you up or get used to it. Funny how one can get used to things in sleeping and when change locations miss it or can't!

There was some kinda old house in Spokane for years that was abandoned down by the crick that was, I think, for the power-line station or RR operator. Last time I was there it was gone. It was normal house with yard, an old swing set, and then abandoned and sorta spooky. Because down in the valley and nothing else around and right by the RR tracks and substation for high-tension powerlines. Hobos, teen drinking etc. Still, oddly, never burnt down (maybe it did with some fires some years ago or maybe destroyed for "liability?")  But there is another guy who still has a house with a spur road and own bridge across crick, now says "PRIVATE ROAD" near-by it. Road changed, I think when they built a better highway type deal. Not sure how, but cool he was able to keep his own bridge and house with nobody nearby.

They recently built a new road and highway area near me here and I noticed that they moved ALL the old buildings, barns, etc from the old ranch onto an adjacent lot several acres away. Been a few years and still sitting there on stilts, jacks, blocks. Not sure what, if anything, they are going to do with them or if it was just a "what will it take, old man, for us to buy your property and build a strip-mall and a new road? Pay you $$ and move your crap? Ok." For years I've thought, around this time of year, that would make a GREAT haunted house set-up!!

Rikki Gins

  • Ellightened
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Karma: 2071
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #538 on: October 27, 2018, 03:17:03 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


This intriguing postcard states that the people above are roaming the streets of Paris, specifically the Boulevard of the Italians.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


There is a date on the back of the card and it looks like April 12, 1916 to me, but I'm guessing.  I'm kind of hoping that Bart can translate the French words on the back.  It would be fun to know what the person wrote.

Bart Ell

  • Bartministrator
  • Ellevated
  • *****
  • Posts: 10493
  • Karma: 2
Re: The Postcard Thread
« Reply #539 on: October 28, 2018, 05:49:03 AM »
I'm kind of hoping that Bart can translate the French words on the back.  It would be fun to know what the person wrote.

It doesn't look French to me, I can't make out a single word.