Author Topic: The 100 Years Ago Thread  (Read 86111 times)

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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #75 on: July 24, 2018, 01:34:19 PM »
You think they had Pee Wee hold one of those novelty, give-away small bats for the photo?

Ha, I hadn't noticed but you are right.  Pee Wee would have been ahead of his time if he had used it for self defense, or had wrapped barb wire around it.

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #76 on: July 25, 2018, 01:26:22 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 25, 1918.
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Troops of the American 326th Regiment moving forward German trenches at Choloy, 25 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215778 © IWM (Q 70733)


From the U.S. National Archives, July 25, 1918.

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Manufacturing airplanes for the government by Dayton-Wright Airplane Company. Completed plane on exhibition.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/35740357@N03/5506534874 Access Restrictions: Unrestricted. Use Restrictions: Unrestricted.
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Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #77 on: July 25, 2018, 01:56:41 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, July 25, 1918.


Klamath Falls Boy Obtains Souvenirs

  According to the Klamath Falls Herald, Mrs. Nate Otterhein is the proud possessor of a unique souvenir in the shape of a pair of vases made from shells of the famous French "75" guns now being used with such deadly execution against the Boche forces in France.

  Some time ago a letter from her son, Louis Hoagland, with the aviation forces now in France, notified her that the souvenirs were on the way, and further said that the shells were used in the greatest battle of the war up to that time. He also informed her that he had received his service stripe for six months foreign service, and expressed the hope that before he was entitled to another one the argument would be settled and he would be on the way back home.
 
  Louis Hoagland is a grandson of Mrs. A. L. Harvey of this city.



albrecht

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #78 on: July 25, 2018, 03:56:49 PM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Ashland (Oregon) Tidings, July 25, 1918.


Klamath Falls Boy Obtains Souvenirs

  According to the Klamath Falls Herald, Mrs. Nate Otterhein is the proud possessor of a unique souvenir in the shape of a pair of vases made from shells of the famous French "75" guns now being used with such deadly execution against the Boche forces in France.

  Some time ago a letter from her son, Louis Hoagland, with the aviation forces now in France, notified her that the souvenirs were on the way, and further said that the shells were used in the greatest battle of the war up to that time. He also informed her that he had received his service stripe for six months foreign service, and expressed the hope that before he was entitled to another one the argument would be settled and he would be on the way back home.
 
  Louis Hoagland is a grandson of Mrs. A. L. Harvey of this city.

I wonder if he is related to RCH?

"Boche is an abbreviation of caboche, (compare bochon, an abbreviation of cabochon). This is a recognized French word used familiarly for "head," especially a big, thick head, ("slow-pate"). It is derived from the Latin word caput and the suffix oceus. Boche seems to have been used first in the underworld of Paris about 1860, with the meaning of a disagreeable, troublesome fellow. In the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 it was not applied to the Germans, but soon afterward it was applied by the Parisian printers to their German assistants because of the reputed slowness of comprehension of these foreign printers. The epithet then used was tête de boche, which had the meaning of tête carrée d'Allemand (German blockhead or imbécile). The next step was to apply boche to Germans in general."
-Peter Wehle. "Die Wiener Gaunersprache", 1977, p. 79


Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #79 on: July 25, 2018, 07:02:59 PM »
I wonder if he is related to RCH?

"Boche is an abbreviation of caboche, (compare bochon, an abbreviation of cabochon). This is a recognized French word used familiarly for "head," especially a big, thick head, ("slow-pate"). It is derived from the Latin word caput and the suffix oceus. Boche seems to have been used first in the underworld of Paris about 1860, with the meaning of a disagreeable, troublesome fellow. In the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 it was not applied to the Germans, but soon afterward it was applied by the Parisian printers to their German assistants because of the reputed slowness of comprehension of these foreign printers. The epithet then used was tête de boche, which had the meaning of tête carrée d'Allemand (German blockhead or imbécile). The next step was to apply boche to Germans in general."
-Peter Wehle. "Die Wiener Gaunersprache", 1977, p. 79

I see a vague resemblance to Richard in the eyes and nose.  Plus Louis is sporting an odd hairstyle...does that sort of thing get passed on through heridity?  Photoshop Richard's beard onto Louis' clean shaven face and I think we might have something.

Nice info on the word Boche.  Pronouinced Bosh, rhyms with wash, right?  The doughboys also liked to refer to the Germans as being 'The Dutch.'  I never could figure that one out.



Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #80 on: July 27, 2018, 01:29:25 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 27, 1918.


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American troops playing craps game at Camp Flowerdown, Winchester, 27 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205215776 © IWM (Q 70731)

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American and British officers resting at the officers' club at the Flowerdown Camp at Winchester, 27 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205165364 © IWM (Q 72742)



Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #81 on: July 27, 2018, 01:49:11 AM »
From the Library of Congress.  The Tonopah Daily Bonanza, July 27, 1918.


DOPE FIEND AT AUSTIN TRIES TO HANG HIMSELF

  Roger Rutherford, who has been in the county jail in Austin about three weeks, serving a term for petty larceny, made a second attempt at self destruction Thursday afternoon. Rutherford is said to have been a drug user and it was that which caused his downfall. The rope for the job had been made by the prisoner from the pillow slip from his bed. He was committed to the insane asylum. Austin Reveille.

Roger had been in trouble before.  This from the May 1st 1916 Tonopah Bonanza:

RUTHERFORD GOES TO PRISON

  Roger M. Rutherford, alias George Walace, was sent back to the state prison at Carson City last Tuesday under charge of John Lacey, a guard from the prison. A telegram to Sheriff Crain from Warden Dlckerson last Monday stated that the board of pardons had revoked Rutherford's parole and instructed the sheriff to turn him over to Guard Lacy for return to the prison to serve out the balance of his old sentence. Ely Record.




Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #82 on: July 28, 2018, 12:39:26 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 28, 1918.


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Brigadier General Benjamin Foulois of the US Air Force in a Liberty aircraft at Colombey-les-Belles, 28 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205315718 © IWM (Q 70311)

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French Renault FT-17 tanks resting after an attack near Grisolles, 28 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205307484 © IWM (Q 58238)

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #83 on: July 28, 2018, 01:06:56 AM »

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #84 on: July 29, 2018, 01:30:35 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 29, 1918.

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First Lieutenant A. B. Alexander (pilot) and Second Lieutenant E. McLennen (observer) starting on a flight in a Breguet biplane. Amanty, 29 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205306146 © IWM (Q 56647)

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Battle of Tardenois. Troops of the 8th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (62nd Division) moving back from the front line after they had captured Montaigne de Bligny hill, 29 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205246715 © IWM (Q 11090)

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #85 on: July 29, 2018, 02:27:03 AM »
From the Library of Congress, July 29, 1918.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza:

PRO GERMAN GRABBED WHILE MAKING TALK

  Bert Steinberger, lessee of the Casino, may have a German name, but he has nothing of the German nature as he is a 100 per cent American and wants everybody to know that before they set foot in his house. This afternoon Pete Kristich, who had been reading the bulletins and imbibing Dutch courage, floated into the Casino and engaged in a war talk during the course of which he remarked that he hoped the Kaiser would win the war and that he would win it anyhow. How much further he would have gone with his assertions and predictions remains unknown, for in about ten seconds the stalwart form of Jack Grant, chief of police, who had been summoned by phone, loomed up in front of the bar and Mr. Kristich was lugged off to the town Bastille.


TAKEN TO JAIL TO STOP HEMORRHAGE OF THE NOSE

  Alex M Gibbons, recently released from the county jail, proceeded to celebrate the event in his customary style and was seized with a nose bleed so violently that Chief of Police Jack Grant thought he would be better off back in the old quarters on the hill where he could have medical attention.


EGG FAMINE IN HAWAII

  Honolulu is threatened with an egg famine. Because of the high price of feed Japanese and Chinese poultry men are disposing of their hens. Eggs now are a luxury, selling from 80 to 90 cents a dozen with prices of cold storage eggs, imported from the mainland, almost as high.


IMITATION SHRAPNEL SHOWN ON MIZPAH

  Saturday afternoon frequenters of Mizpah hill and residents along the trail leading to the property of the Tonopah Mining company were treated to an exhibition of war that threw a scare into the district. The powder gang working on the dump which is being shipped to the mill at Millers put in two shots that evidently were too strong for a surface display with the result that rocks as large as a man's head were strewn all over the neighborhood. Some fell on the firehouse and the gymnasium and the water office was peppered as though it was an outpost of Chateau Thierry. Fortunately no damage was done.


The Rogue River (Grants Pass, Oregon) Courier:

R.W. DE WITT ESCAPES FROM COUNTY JAIL

  The Josephine county jail was the scene last night of another successful jail break, when R. W. DeWitt, who was held to await the action of the grand jury, escaped through a hole in the brick wall. DeWitt is the man held for the robbery of the Boswell mine near Takilma early in May, when about $6000 in gold was stolen.

  Sheriff Lewis states that DeWitt had outside help, a confederate digging a hole in the brick wall on the Fifth street side of the jail, entering the corridor, picking the lock to the "tank," where DeWitt and four other men were confined, and releasing DeWitt. When the jail was opened this morning everything about the lock was found to be in order, but one prisoner was gone. The other prisoners say that they were awakened shortly before daylight by a scratching noise and the falling of brick, but they were afraid to make any outcry for fear of being shot in their cages.

  Up to the present time there is no clue as to the whereabouts of DeWitt.




Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #86 on: July 30, 2018, 02:03:40 AM »
From the Imperial War Museum, July 30, 1918.

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A Sopwith Camel biplane of the Royal Flying Corps in flight at Beauval, 30 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205028793 © IWM (Q 70046)

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The American Popham panel system of visual aeroplane signalling near Beauval, 30 July 1918.
https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205308122 © IWM (Q 60568)

Rikki Gins

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #87 on: July 30, 2018, 02:37:47 AM »
Austro-Hungarian Air Force fighter pilot Frank Linke-Crawford and American journalist and poet Joyce Kilmer were both killed on July 30, 1918.


Biography of Frank Linke-Crawford: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Linke-Crawford
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His legacy was best described by one of his peers, Julius Arigi, who was the second ranked Austro-Hungarian ace:
"Linke was both a fine flier and a fine man. He gave his men full support and generally ignored the rules about officers and non-officers having little to do with each other. He often gave away victories to other, less experienced pilots. As you can imagine, the feelings of his men for him were quite strong."

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Frank Linke-Crawford
By Official photographer of the Austro-Hungarian army - Official photographer of the Austro-Hungarian army, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47829101


Biography of Joyce Kilmer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joyce_Kilmer
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In the 1940 film, "The Fighting 69th", the role of Sergeant Joyce Kilmer was portrayed by actor Jeffrey Lynn.

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Sgt. Joyce Kilmer, as a member of the Fighting 69th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, c. 1918.
Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=623222


2Lord2Grantham

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #88 on: July 30, 2018, 05:55:57 AM »
From the Library of Congress, July 29, 1918.


The Tonopah (Nevada) Daily Bonanza:

PRO GERMAN GRABBED WHILE MAKING TALK

  Bert Steinberger, lessee of the Casino, may have a German name, but he has nothing of the German nature as he is a 100 per cent American and wants everybody to know that before they set foot in his house. This afternoon Pete Kristich, who had been reading the bulletins and imbibing Dutch courage, floated into the Casino and engaged in a war talk during the course of which he remarked that he hoped the Kaiser would win the war and that he would win it anyhow. How much further he would have gone with his assertions and predictions remains unknown, for in about ten seconds the stalwart form of Jack Grant, chief of police, who had been summoned by phone, loomed up in front of the bar and Mr. Kristich was lugged off to the town Bastille.


*Archival footage of the arrest

K_Dubb

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Re: The 100 Years Ago Thread
« Reply #89 on: July 30, 2018, 07:38:27 AM »
I see a vague resemblance to Richard in the eyes and nose.  Plus Louis is sporting an odd hairstyle...does that sort of thing get passed on through heridity?  Photoshop Richard's beard onto Louis' clean shaven face and I think we might have something.

Nice info on the word Boche.  Pronouinced Bosh, rhyms with wash, right?  The doughboys also liked to refer to the Germans as being 'The Dutch.'  I never could figure that one out.

It is because Germans call themselves Deutsch for the same reason the Dutch do -- in English, they all used to be Dutch.  It's the same old word meaning "the people" and, linguistically at least, they are part of the same continuum from what used to be called High Dutch to Low Dutch (the "high" and "low" referring purely to topography rather than status, the mountainous interior of Europe vs. the low-lying coasts).  It's like how people say the Pennsylvania Dutch are really Germans, but the distinction didn't exist at the time they came over.